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for(i=0;i< m; i++)
{

   for(j=i+1; j < m; j++)
   {

      for(k=0; k < n;k++)
      {
         for(l=0;l< n;l++)
         {if(condition) do something}
      }
   }

} 
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Thanks for the explanations. What effect will a break statement inside the if block make to the complexity of the algo ? –  yashgos Aug 27 '10 at 12:03
    
No effect. In big O notation you always assume worst case. In this example, the worst case is that the condition will never be satisfied, and you'll go through all the iterations. Therefore the time complexity will still be O(n^2*m^2). (I assumed you know nothing about the condition. If the condition was '1+1=2' the complexity whould've changed) –  snakile Aug 27 '10 at 13:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In details:

The two first loops will result in (m-1) + (m-2) + (m-3) + ... + 1 repetitions, which is equal to m*(m-1)/2. As for the second two loops, they basically run from 0 to n-1 so they need n^2 iterations.

As you have no clue whether the condition will be fulfilled or not, then you take the worst case, which is it being always fulfilled.

Then the number of iterations is:

m*(m+1)/2*n^2*NumberOfIterations(Something)

In O notation, the constants and lower degrees are not necessary, so the complexity is:

O(m^2*n^2)*O(Something)

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The second two loops are different - both k and l always start from zero and end at n. Not relevant to big O - just pedanting. –  Steve314 Aug 27 '10 at 10:48
    
Oh, sorry, I didn't notice that. Then the second two loops require n^2 iterations. So the process goes as follows: Number of Iterations = m*(m+1)*n^2*NumberOfIterations(Something). But the result will still be the same. I will edit my original answer. –  Rafid Aug 27 '10 at 10:53
    
It is m * (m - 1) /2 as I have stated in my answer. –  Ani Aug 27 '10 at 11:00
    
Ani, thanks for the comment. You are right. Let me correct it. –  Rafid Aug 27 '10 at 11:19
    
Thanks for such good explanations.And what change will a break statement inside the if block make to the time complexity ? –  yashgos Aug 27 '10 at 11:40
for(i=0;i< m; i++)
{  
   for(j=i+1; j < m; j++)
   {

The inner loop will run ((m-1) + (m-2) + ... 1) times

= 1 + 2 + 3 + ...m-1 
= m * (m - 1) / 2

for(k=0; k < n;k++)
{
   for(l=0;l< n;l++)
   {

In this case, the inner loop clearly runs n * n times


So clearly, the number of iterations is exactly

  (m * (m - 1) / 2) * (n * n)
= O(m^2 * n^2)

Obviously, this assumes that if(condition) do something runs in constant time.

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Looks like O(m^2 n^2) to me, assuming the "something" is constant-time.

Although the j loop starts from a different point with each step, the combined effect of the i and j loops is still an m^2 factor.

Evaluating the unstated condition itself would normally be (at least) a constant time operation, so certainly the loop cannot be faster than O(m^2 n^2) - unless, of course, the "something" includes a break, goto, exception throw or whatever that exits out of one or more of the loops early.

All bets are off if, for any reason, either n or m isn't constant throughout.

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I assume the time complexity of "do something" is O(S).

Let's start with the most inner loop: It's time complexity is O(n*S) because it does something n times. The loop which wraps the most inner loop has a time complexity of O(n)*O(n*S)=O(n^2*S) because it does the inner loop n times.

The loop whcih wraps the second most inner loop has a time complexity of O(m-i)*O(n^2*S) because it does an O(n^2*S) operation m-i times.

Now for the harder part: for each i in the range 0...m-1 we do an (m-i)*O(n^2*S) operation. How long does it take? (1 + 2 + 3 + ... + m)*O(n^2*S). But (1 + 2 + ... + m) is the sum of an arithmetic sequence. Therefore the sum equals to m*(m-1)/2=O(m^2).

Conclusion: We do an O(n^2*S) operation about m^2 times. The time complexity of the whole thing is O(m^2*n^2*S)

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O(m^2*n^2*(compexity of something)). If condition and something are executed in constant time then O(m^2*n^2).

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What about k and l? –  ziggystar Aug 27 '10 at 10:42
    
@ziggystar, what about them? They're bound by n, so no need to include them in the big-O notation. –  Bart Kiers Aug 27 '10 at 10:43
    
The -1 is not mine, but the spoon-feed answer without any explanation makes it understandable. –  Bart Kiers Aug 27 '10 at 10:45

O(m²*n²) *complexity of "something"

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