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I have a list, and each item is linked, is there a way I can alternate the background colors for each item?

<ul>
    <li><a href="link">Link 1</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 2</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 3</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 4</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 5</a></li>
</ul>
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10  
this is also known as "tiger striping" and no I am not kidding –  Jeff Atwood Dec 11 '08 at 7:42

9 Answers 9

up vote 143 down vote accepted

How about some lovely CSS3?

li { background: green; }
li:nth-child(odd) { background: red; }
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2  
best solution, css3 rulez :) –  Mike Jun 10 '11 at 15:26
4  
+1 for no extra libraries –  shmeeps Jun 28 '11 at 14:08
    
I'd agree that as long as IE7- isn't the sole targeted browser, this answer is now the better option. A lot has improved in two years! –  Phil.Wheeler Jun 29 '11 at 20:22
1  
Actually, it isn't supported in IE8 either: http://caniuse.com/#css-sel3. Currently, this will work for 2 out of 3 users. –  Brian Koser Nov 16 '11 at 18:06
    
This is the best option because it doesn't require presentational markup. +1! –  paperless Sep 9 '12 at 16:52

If you want to do this purely in CSS then you'd have a class that you'd assign to each alternate list item. E.g.

<ul>
    <li class="alternate"><a href="link">Link 1</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 2</a></li>
    <li class="alternate"><a href="link">Link 3</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 4</a></li>
    <li class="alternate"><a href="link">Link 5</a></li>
</ul>

If your list is dynamically generated, this task would be much easier.

If you don't want to have to manually update this content each time, you could use the jQuery library and apply a style alternately to each <li> item in your list:

<ul id="myList">
    <li><a href="link">Link 1</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 2</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 3</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 4</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 5</a></li>
</ul>

And your jQuery code:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $('#myList li:nth-child(odd)').addClass('alternate');
});
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3  
Wow. Everyone reckons you should go with jQuery. –  Phil.Wheeler Dec 11 '08 at 3:27
9  
Upvote for not using tables in your example... –  Zack The Human Dec 11 '08 at 3:47
2  
I just reminded me not to lazily copy/paste an example. There is a subtle error in the code above. It lacks the $ in front of the selector. It should be $('#myList li:nth-child(odd)'). –  danglund Oct 6 '10 at 11:03
    
@danglund Good spotting. Fixed it. –  Phil.Wheeler Oct 7 '10 at 9:44

You can achieve this by adding alternating style classes to each list item

<ul>
    <li class="odd"><a href="link">Link 1</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 2</a></li>
    <li class="odd"><a href="link">Link 2</a></li>
    <li><a href="link">Link 2</a></li>
</ul>

And then styling it like

li { backgorund:white; }
li.odd { background:silver; }

You can further automate this process with javascript (jQuery example below)

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('table tbody tr:odd').addClass('odd');
});
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Since you using standard HTML you will need to define separate class for and manual set the rows to the classes.

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This and the fact that you can do it automatically with a javascript after effect like the accepted answer says. I just wanted to give you a +1 for a correct answer. –  Karl Dec 11 '08 at 4:28

Try adding a pair of class attributes, say 'even' and 'odd', to alternating list elements, e.g.

<ul>
    <li class="even"><a href="link">Link 1</a></li>
    <li class="odd"><a href="link">Link 2</a></li>
    <li class="even"><a href="link">Link 3</a></li>
    <li class="odd"><a href="link">Link 4</a></li>
    <li class="even"><a href="link">Link 5</a></li>
</ul>

In a <style> section of the HTML page, or in a linked stylesheet, you would define those same classes, specifying your desired background colours:

li.even { background-color: red; }
li.odd { background-color: blue; }

You might want to use a template library as your needs evolve to provide you with greater flexibility and to cut down on the typing. Why type all those list elements by hand?

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You can do it by specifying alternating class names on the rows. I prefer using row0 and row1, which means you can easily add them in, if the list is being built programmatically:

for ($i = 0; $i < 10; ++$i) {
    echo '<tr class="row' . ($i % 2) . '">...</tr>';
}

Another way would be to use javascript. jQuery is being used in this example:

$('table tr:odd').addClass('row1');

Edit: I don't know why I gave examples using table rows... replace tr with li and table with ul and it applies to your example

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If you use the jQuery solution it will work on IE8:

jQuery

$(document).ready(function(){
$('#myList li:nth-child(odd)').addClass('alternate');
});

CSS

.alternate {
background: black;
}

If you use the CSS soloution it won't work on IE8:

li:nth-child(odd) {
    background: black;
}
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hmmm

There is a jQuery plugin for that jQuery.Alternate Plugin , more simpler and easier , thu this was good practice . and solutions !

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the link goes to an empty page btw. –  Matt Setter Jan 16 '12 at 14:22

You can by hardcoding the sequence, like so:

li, li + li + li, li + li + li + li + li {
  background-color: black;
}

li + li, li + li + li + li {
  background-color: white;
}
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2  
That's a massive pain in the ass and it doesn't work in IE6 :( –  nickf Dec 11 '08 at 3:23
    
@nickf Yeah. I think the "proper" way involves CSS3 and next to nothing supports that. –  sblundy Dec 11 '08 at 3:27
    
It's ugly but workable; +1 from me 'cos it didn't deserve -5 :) –  Nick Jun 1 '13 at 4:57

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