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I have spent several hours with this SQL problem, which I thought would be easy - I still think it should be, but obviously not easy enough for me (not an SQL expert). I would be glad if you could help me with this.

I have stripped this down for this example. Imagine two tables:

PRODUCT
 -ID
 -NAME

REVIEW
 -ID
 -PRODUCT_ID
 -USER_ID
 -CONTENT

Where each user can review a product only once.

What I need now is an SQL query that returns all products together with the reviews of a given user. If a user has not reviewed a product, there should be NULL values returned for the review columns.

I thought something like the following would do, but obviously it does not, since only reviewed products are returned.

SELECT p.*, r.* 
from PRODUCT p join REVIEW r 
  on r.PRODUCT_ID = p.ID 
where r.USER_ID=:userId

I would be veeeeery happy if someone could help me out with this. I am pretty sure there has to be some kind of subselect involved, but I do not seem to be able to figure it out myself :(

BTW: I need to translate this to HQL, so the solution should not make use of features like UNION, which are not supported in HQL.

Thanks a lot & best regards, Peter

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1  
This is a standard problem in SQL. You need to use an outer join instead of an inner join. Googling for joins in SQL will give you lots of good info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Join_(SQL)#Outer_joins –  Matt Greer Aug 27 '10 at 12:39
    
Doing an outer join did not make a difference in this case. The problem was with the userId restriction, see my answer... Thanks for your input, anyway :) –  PeterP Aug 27 '10 at 12:49

5 Answers 5

SELECT p.*, r.* 
 from PRODUCT p LEFT JOIN REVIEW r 
  on r.PRODUCT_ID = p.ID 
 where r.USER_ID=:userId
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No, this does not make a difference, at least not on Oracle. AFAIK, join is left per default. As you can see, I have just figured out the solution, see my answer... Thanks for the reply, anyway :) –  PeterP Aug 27 '10 at 12:48
1  
@Peter - I'm pretty certain that is not the case. Are you absolutely certain the keyword left is nowhere to be seen in your query? –  Martin Smith Aug 27 '10 at 12:49
    
Thanks for the hint, see my comment on my answer. Still, this solution does not work when having the user restriction in the WHERE clause. But thanks a lot for all your input on this :) –  PeterP Aug 27 '10 at 12:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ah, just after posting this, I have finally found the answer on another site. (I have searched before, I swear ;-)

The trick is not to have the userId restriction in a WHERE clause, but rather as part of the JOIN:

SELECT p.*, r.* 
from PRODUCT p LEFT JOIN REVIEW r 
  on r.PRODUCT_ID = p.ID AND r.USER_ID=:userId

Thanks for your thoughts!

(edited: also have to use a LEFT join, as pointed out by Martin Smith, thanks!)

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Unless you are using an outer join this change will make zero difference. –  Martin Smith Aug 27 '10 at 12:48
    
It does, at least in Oracle SQL, for me... but thanks for the hint, HQL might still be interpreting this differently –  PeterP Aug 27 '10 at 12:53
    
You can make your query clearer by explicitly stating whether the join is inner or left outer. –  kbrimington Aug 27 '10 at 12:56
    
Argh... you got me. I am very sorry. Obviously I have confused different statements in my SQL developer window, I have been experimenting with. Thanks for pointing this out, I have fixed the statement with the missing LEFT. –  PeterP Aug 27 '10 at 12:56
    
BOO YA! See, told you to drop the where ;) That said, depending on the RDBMS, you may need to put the condition (with regard to NULL) in the join and/or WHERE. Some MySQL versions will run faster w/added WHERE because it will exclude non-match rows on the first pass whereas with JOIN parameters, the reduction won't be performed until ALL rows are joined. –  nessence Aug 27 '10 at 13:00

To get the effect you described, you should use a left outer join, but constrain your right-hand side by either a matching user ID or null.

SELECT p.*, r.* 
 from PRODUCT p LEFT OUTER JOIN REVIEW r 
  on r.PRODUCT_ID = p.ID 
 where r.USER_ID=:userId or r.USER_ID is null
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If you want to select products where a no users have created a review:

SELECT p.*, r.* from PRODUCT p join REVIEW r on r.PRODUCT_ID = p.ID
WHERE r.USER_ID IS NULL

If you want to select products where a specific user hasn't created a review:

SELECT p.*, r.* from PRODUCT p join REVIEW r on r.PRODUCT_ID = p.ID
WHERE r.USER_ID IS NULL or r.USER_ID!=:userId
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I cannot just drop a part of the query, since I need to restrict on a user.... Pls see my answer, which I have finally found out. Thanks anyway :) –  PeterP Aug 27 '10 at 12:52
    
Hm, but this one does not return the products which have been only reviewed by the given user, no? –  PeterP Aug 27 '10 at 13:02
    
I misread -- I generated a query pull all the products which the user has yet to review. Your posted answer below is correct. –  nessence Aug 27 '10 at 13:08

Another aproach using subqueries

SELECT P., R. FROM PRODUCT P LEFT JOIN (SELECT * FROM REVIEW WHERE UserId=:userId) UR ON UR.ProductId=P.ID

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