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In this code how to generate a Java class for composite key (how to composite key in hibernate):

create table Time (
        levelStation int(15) not null,
        src varchar(100) not null,
        dst varchar(100) not null,
        distance int(15) not null,
        price int(15) not null,
        confPathID int(15) not null,
        constraint ConfPath_fk foreign key(confPathID) references ConfPath(confPathID),
        primary key (levelStation,ConfPathID)
)ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 ;
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5 Answers 5

To map a composite key, you can use the EmbeddedId or the IdClass annotations. I know this question is not strictly about JPA but the rules defined by the specification also applies. So here they are:

2.1.4 Primary Keys and Entity Identity

...

A composite primary key must correspond to either a single persistent field or property or to a set of such fields or properties as described below. A primary key class must be defined to represent a composite primary key. Composite primary keys typically arise when mapping from legacy databases when the database key is comprised of several columns. The EmbeddedId and IdClass annotations are used to denote composite primary keys. See sections 9.1.14 and 9.1.15.

...

The following rules apply for composite primary keys:

  • The primary key class must be public and must have a public no-arg constructor.
  • If property-based access is used, the properties of the primary key class must be public or protected.
  • The primary key class must be serializable.
  • The primary key class must define equals and hashCode methods. The semantics of value equality for these methods must be consistent with the database equality for the database types to which the key is mapped.
  • A composite primary key must either be represented and mapped as an embeddable class (see Section 9.1.14, “EmbeddedId Annotation”) or must be represented and mapped to multiple fields or properties of the entity class (see Section 9.1.15, “IdClass Annotation”).
  • If the composite primary key class is mapped to multiple fields or properties of the entity class, the names of primary key fields or properties in the primary key class and those of the entity class must correspond and their types must be the same.

With an IdClass

The class for the composite primary key could look like (could be a static inner class):

public class TimePK implements Serializable {
    protected Integer levelStation;
    protected Integer confPathID;

    public TimePK() {}

    public TimePK(Integer levelStation, String confPathID) {
        this.levelStation = levelStation;
        this.confPathID = confPathID;
    }
    // equals, hashCode
}

And the entity:

@Entity
@IdClass(TimePK.class)
class Time implements Serializable {
    @Id
    private Integer levelStation;
    @Id
    private Integer confPathID;

    private String src;
    private String dst;
    private Integer distance;
    private Integer price;

    // getters, setters
}

The IdClass annotation maps multiple fields to the table PK.

With EmbeddedId

The class for the composite primary key could look like (could be a static inner class):

@Embeddable
public class TimePK implements Serializable {
    protected Integer levelStation;
    protected Integer confPathID;

    public TimePK() {}

    public TimePK(Integer levelStation, String confPathID) {
        this.levelStation = levelStation;
        this.confPathID = confPathID;
    }
    // equals, hashCode
}

And the entity:

@Entity
class Time implements Serializable {
    @EmbeddedId
    private TimePK timePK;

    private String src;
    private String dst;
    private Integer distance;
    private Integer price;

    //...
}

The @EmbeddedId annotation maps a PK class to table PK.

Differences:

  • From the physical model point of view, there are no differences
  • EmbeddedId somehow communicates more clearly that the key is a composite key and IMO makes sense when the combined pk is either a meaningful entity itself or it reused in your code.
  • @IdClass is useful to specify that some combination of fields is unique but these do not have a special meaning.

They also affect the way you write queries (making them more or less verbose):

  • with IdClass

    select t.levelStation from Time t
    
  • with EmbeddedId

    select t.timePK.levelStation from Time t
    

References

  • JPA 1.0 specification
    • Section 2.1.4 "Primary Keys and Entity Identity"
    • Section 9.1.14 "EmbeddedId Annotation"
    • Section 9.1.15 "IdClass Annotation"
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1  
There is also a Hibernate-specific solution: Map multiple properties as @Id properties without declaring an external class to be the identifier type (and use the IdClass annotation). See 5.1.2.1. Composite identifier in the Hibernate manual. –  boberj Mar 11 at 19:40

You need to use @EmbeddedId:

@Entity
class Time {
  @EmbeddedId
  TimeId id;

  String src;
  String dst;
  Integer distance;
  Integer price;
}

@Embeddable
class TimeId implements Serializable {
  Integer levelStation;
  Integet confPathID;
}
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need define other class for TimeId? –  kaaf Aug 27 '10 at 14:29
2  
@kaaf Yes, you need to define your primary key in its own class –  Thierry-Dimitri Roy Aug 27 '10 at 14:46
    
@Thierry-DimitriRoy how could I assign the timeId.levelStation and timeId.confPathID. Could you provide an example please? –  silentbang Jan 21 at 17:28

Looks like you are doing this from scratch. Try using available reverse engineering tools like Netbeans Entities from Database to at least get the basics automated (like embedded ids). This can become a huge headache if you have many tables. I suggest avoid reinventing the wheel and use as many tools available as possible to reduce coding to the minimum and most important part, what you intent to do.

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The primary key class must define equals and hashCode methods

  1. When implementing equals you should use instanceof to allow comparing with subclasses. If Hibernate lazy loads a one to one or many to one relation, you will have a proxy for the class instead of the plain class. A proxy is a subclass. Comparing the class names would fail.
    More technically: You should follow the Liskows Substitution Principle and ignore symmetricity.
  2. The next pitfall is using something like name.equals(that.name) instead of name.equals(that.getName()). The first will fail, if that is a proxy.

http://www.laliluna.de/jpa-hibernate-guide/ch06s06.html

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Another option is to map is as a Map of composite elements in the ConfPath table.

This mapping would benefit from an index on (ConfPathID,levelStation) though.

public class ConfPath {
    private Map<Long,Time> timeForLevelStation = new HashMap<Long,Time>();

    public Time getTime(long levelStation) {
        return timeForLevelStation.get(levelStation);
    }

    public void putTime(long levelStation, Time newValue) {
        timeForLevelStation.put(levelStation, newValue);
    }
}

public class Time {
    String src;
    String dst;
    long distance;
    long price;

    public long getDistance() {
        return distance;
    }

    public void setDistance(long distance) {
        this.distance = distance;
    }

    public String getDst() {
        return dst;
    }

    public void setDst(String dst) {
        this.dst = dst;
    }

    public long getPrice() {
        return price;
    }

    public void setPrice(long price) {
        this.price = price;
    }

    public String getSrc() {
        return src;
    }

    public void setSrc(String src) {
        this.src = src;
    }
}

Mapping:

<class name="ConfPath" table="ConfPath">
    <id column="ID" name="id">
        <generator class="native"/>
    </id>
    <map cascade="all-delete-orphan" name="values" table="example"
            lazy="extra">
        <key column="ConfPathID"/>
        <map-key type="long" column="levelStation"/>
        <composite-element class="Time">
            <property name="src" column="src" type="string" length="100"/>
            <property name="dst" column="dst" type="string" length="100"/>
            <property name="distance" column="distance"/>
            <property name="price" column="price"/>
        </composite-element>
    </map>
</class>
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