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I used type erasure pattern in C++, i.e I hide a template class with an abstract class

class Base{

  virtual ~Base(){}

 //pure virtual methods...
};

template<typename T>
class Derived : Base{

Derived<T>(){}
~Derived(){}

//public methods...

private :
vector<T> datas;

};

problem : if I want to retrieve or modify datas, I have to use the Base class

how do I défine the accessors getDatas() and SetDatas(vector datas) ?

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1  
I'm sorry, I'm confused. Why can't you put getDatas() and SetDatas() under public methods in Derived? –  The Alchemist Aug 27 '10 at 14:51
    
I thought type erasure was a problem which people tried to solve, not a pattern people tried to create. Type erasure is what happens with java generics because they aren't as powerful as C++ templates. –  Philip Potter Aug 27 '10 at 14:58
1  
@the-alchemist: Because this is a polymorphic class hierarchy and derived class objects are accessed through a base class reference/pointer. –  sbi Aug 27 '10 at 14:59
2  
@Philip: See artima.com/cppsource/type_erasure.html –  sbi Aug 27 '10 at 15:00
    
@Philip I used type erasure because I had in an external class a vector<Derived<T> > and I couldn't provide T –  user408535 Aug 27 '10 at 15:05
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4 Answers 4

You're trying to implement type-erasure and then asking how you can make clients operate on the types that you're erasing. The pattern that you're deploying here is only appropriate if the derived classes of Base have operations in common that can be called without reference to the concrete type of data that they store. If there are no such common operations and the only semantically useful things for clients to do through your Base interface involve using the concrete types of the derived classes, then you won't be able to use this design.

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ok my initial problem before I chose this solution was that in my main I'got vector<My_class<T> >; if type-erasure is not the soltuion, wat can I do ? –  user408535 Aug 27 '10 at 15:18
    
@user408535 I don't really understand your initial problem as described. If clients of the interface need to know the underlying data type, then you either have to get rid of the interface or make it a template interface. If you can formulate a set of functions for the interface that don't require the underlying data type, then you could leave it as a non-template interface. –  bshields Aug 27 '10 at 15:28
    
problem is vector<My_class<T> > is in declaration so I don't possess T at this time and I get a compilation error –  user408535 Aug 27 '10 at 15:30
    
@user208535 right, that's why you would have to templatize Base if you want to keep that in your declaration, there's really no other way around it. Base would have to have a template parameter T which would be the same T in your My_class<T>. –  bshields Aug 27 '10 at 15:34
    
I mean that at first I had vector<Base<T> > in my int main() and with no way to provide T, so error; it became vector<Base> witha derived template class that's the purpose of type-erasure –  user408535 Aug 27 '10 at 15:42
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You cannot define a SetData( vector ) since std::vector needs a type, and obiously you cannot define SetData( std::vector< T > ) in the Base if you have no definition for T.

So if you really need this and think this is the way to go, you'll have to look into type dispatching (or make a hack using void*). Boost uses type dispatching in some places, else google provides examples.

edit simple example of what it can look like; not really type dispatching but more straightforward

class Base
{
public:
  template< class T >
  bool SetData( const std::vector< T >& t )
  {
    return SetData( static_cast< const void* >( &t ), typeid( t ) );
  }

protected:
  virtual bool SetData( const void*, const std::type_info& ) = 0;
};

template< class T >
class Derived : public Base
{
protected:
  bool SetData( const void* p, const std::type_info& info )
  {
    if( info == typeid( std::vector< T > ) )
    {
      const std::vector< T >& v = *static_cast< const std::vector< T >* >( p );
      //ok same type, this should work
      //do something with data here
      return true;
    }
    else
    {
      //not good, different types
      return false;
    }
  }
};
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typeof doesn't exist in C++ ? –  user408535 Aug 27 '10 at 15:20
    
sorry I meant typeid.. –  stijn Aug 27 '10 at 15:25
1  
Yep, that's what you would need to do. I suppose this basically is what boost::any does under the hood, though. Frankly, I'd rather use boost::any than invent my own. –  sbi Aug 27 '10 at 15:32
    
@stijn ok nice but after all these answers, I become doubtful about my choice if I could resolve vector<My_class<T> > without interface, this would be great –  user408535 Aug 27 '10 at 15:33
1  
My understanding is that you can't have pure virtual template member functions. I think Base has to be a template class here. –  bshields Aug 27 '10 at 15:35
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Type erasure is a form of (run-time) polymorphism where derived classes are generated from a template.

As with all forms of polymorphisms, derived classes need to have something in common which can, syntactically, be expressed in the base class.

Edit:

OK, stijn's answer gave me an idea. While I still think you should use something off the shelf (boost::any), just for kicks, here's a sketch:

class Base
{
public:
  template< class T >
  bool SetData(const std::vector<T>& data)
  {
    return SetData(&data,typeid(T));
  }
private:
  virtual bool SetData(const void* data, const std::type_info& tid) = 0;
}

template< class T >
class Derived : public Base
{
public:
  bool DoSetData(const std::vector<T>& data)
  {
    // tbd
  }
private:
  virtual bool SetData(const void* data, const std::typeinfo& tid)
  {
    if( tid != typeid(T) )
      return false;
    const std::vector<T>* pdata = reinterpret_cast<const std::vector<T>*>(data);
    return DoSetData(*pdata);
  }
}

What say you?

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lol seems very complicated to me, I don't have your skills; i think I should forget the virtual methods, I can't even remember why I put them (tied to boost.serialization, maybe). By the way, I'm totally ready to choose boost.any, but the same question remains : does it allow me to access dats of my template class behind? –  user408535 Aug 27 '10 at 15:58
    
you were ahead of me ;P –  stijn Aug 27 '10 at 16:03
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Ultimately, the user of the class must know what T is in order to work with datas in your derived type, even if they are accessing it through the base type.

You may be able to set up a somewhat generic interface with a void*, but the user of your class will still have to match up a each class instance to the specific type, T. If T is int, users will have to know that collection is based on int.

If you want to store any type in the vector, without worrying about which instance is which type, you could make T void*. If you do this, you could even skip the template<typename T> part of derived. It could become a non-template class.

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but if I keep T, there must be a template<typenename T> somwhere in Derived ? –  user408535 Aug 27 '10 at 15:14
    
@user408535: Yeah, I'm just saying if you decide to use void*, so that you can put any object together in the vector, you wouldn't necessarily need T anymore. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 27 '10 at 15:25
    
oh, ok but isn't void* dangerous ? –  user408535 Aug 27 '10 at 15:35
    
@user408535: In some senses, absolutely. There is no type safety. This means your program is free to behave badly at runtime rather than fail to compile. If you are erasing the type, that is essentially what you hope to achieve anyhow. Void* is safe if the consumer and producer treat it correctly, just like any other pointer. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 27 '10 at 22:39
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