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I'd like to convert ASCII code (like - or _ or . etc) in hexadecimal representation in Unix shell (without bc command), eg : - => %2d

any ideas ?

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Can sed/awk/perl etc be used? –  KennyTM Aug 27 '10 at 15:37
    
only sed or bash/sh shell please ;) –  Olivier DUVAL Aug 30 '10 at 8:23
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3 Answers

This works in Bash, Dash (sh), ksh, zsh and ash and uses only builtins:

Edit:

Here is a version of ord that outputs in hex and chr that accepts hex input:

ordhex ()
{
    printf '%x' "'$1"
}

chrhex ()
{
    printf \\x"$1"
}

The original decimal versions:

ord ()
{
    echo -n $(( ( 256 + $(printf '%d' "'$1"))%256 ))
}

Examples (with added newlines):

$ ord ' '
32
$ ord _
95
$ ord A
65
$ ord '*'
42
$ ord \~
126

Here is the corresponding chr:

chr ()
{
    printf \\$(($1/64*100+$1%64/8*10+$1%8))
}

Examples:

$ chr 125
}
$ chr 42
*
$ chr 0 | xxd
0000000: 00                                       .
$ chr 255 | xxd
0000000: ff                                       .
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thx but ord function gives me decimal value, I'd like the hexadecimal value of the ascii code, thx for your help –  Olivier DUVAL Aug 30 '10 at 8:25
    
@Olivier: See my edit. –  Dennis Williamson Aug 30 '10 at 9:29
    
great, it's working ! thx a lot –  Olivier DUVAL Aug 30 '10 at 12:26
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perl -e 'print ord("_"), "\n"'
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thx a lot, I'll use this expression with unpack : perl -e 'print unpack("H*","-"), "\n"' –  Olivier DUVAL Aug 30 '10 at 8:51
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python -c 'import sys; print "{0:02x}".format(ord(sys.argv[1]))' '_'

or

python -c 'print "{0:02x}".format(ord("_"))'

I agree that it's not the nicest one-liner, but I couldn't resist after seeing the Perl based answer .

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