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I started to write a terminal text editor, something like the first text editors for UNIX, such as vi. My only goal is to have a good time, but I want to be able to show text in color, so I can have syntax highlighting for editing source code. How can I achieve this? Is there some special POSIX API for this, or do I have to use ncurses? (I'd rather not.)

Any advice? Maybe some textbooks on the UNIX API?

Thanks in advance

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4 Answers 4

up vote 55 down vote accepted

This is a little C program that illustrates how you could use color codes:

#include <stdio.h>

#define KNRM  "\x1B[0m"
#define KRED  "\x1B[31m"
#define KGRN  "\x1B[32m"
#define KYEL  "\x1B[33m"
#define KBLU  "\x1B[34m"
#define KMAG  "\x1B[35m"
#define KCYN  "\x1B[36m"
#define KWHT  "\x1B[37m"

int main()
{
    printf("%sred\n", KRED);
    printf("%sgreen\n", KGRN);
    printf("%syellow\n", KYEL);
    printf("%sblue\n", KBLU);
    printf("%smagenta\n", KMAG);
    printf("%scyan\n", KCYN);
    printf("%swhite\n", KWHT);
    printf("%snormal\n", KNRM);

    return 0;
}
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36  
printf(KMAG "magenta\n"); is much cleaner and faster than using %s. –  user142019 Feb 26 '11 at 12:43
6  
This sets the default color forever after to this new text color. To set it back to the original employ KNRM. –  Schroeder Apr 16 '13 at 22:34
    
Is it possible to use a specific color (perhaps with RGB values like 880000 for dark red, etc.), or are we stuck with the 8 colors in the above example? –  anthropomorphic Jul 20 '13 at 7:33
    
There are color codes for darker colors, bold, and other effects I dont remember. But you cant specify RGB values. –  karlphillip Jul 20 '13 at 12:13
    
@Schroeder #define RESET "\033[0m", and then printf(KMAG "magenta RESET \n"); –  mf_ Jan 7 at 19:41

Here's another way to do it. Some people will prefer this as the code is a bit cleaner (there's no %s and a RESET color to end the coloration).

#include <stdio.h>

#define KNRM  "\x1B[0m"
#define KRED  "\x1B[31m"
#define KGRN  "\x1B[32m"
#define KYEL  "\x1B[33m"
#define KBLU  "\x1B[34m"
#define KMAG  "\x1B[35m"
#define KCYN  "\x1B[36m"
#define KWHT  "\x1B[37m"
#define RESET "\033[0m"

int main()
{
  printf(KRED "red\n" RESET);
  printf(KGRN "green\n" RESET);
  printf(KYEL "yellow\n" RESET);
  printf(KBLU "blue\n" RESET);
  printf(KMAG "magenta\n" RESET);
  printf(KCYN "cyan\n" RESET);
  printf(KWHT "white\n" RESET);
  printf(KNRM "normal\n" RESET);

  return 0;
}

This way, it's easy to do something like:

printf("This is " KRED "red" RESET " and this is " KBLU "blue" RESET "\n");
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You probably want ANSI color codes. Most *nix terminals support them.

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Use ANSI escape sequences. This article goes into some detail about them. You can use them with printf as well.

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