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I'm currently trying to learn HTML and Java EE Servlet programming. I have an application server running on my local machine (Orion Application Server) and I'm connecting to web pages I've deployed on this server using a browser running on the same machine, directed to http://localhost/mypage.htm (for example).

I know W3C has a site you can go to that will validate an HTML page (and count how many errors are found for a given doctype), but that has to be a publicly available URL. How do you validate HTML on a locally running setup like I've described above?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

many options:

see installation of w3c validation service:

http://validator.w3.org/docs/install.html

Firefox addons:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/918419/firefox-addon-or-other-tool-to-locally-validate-html-pages

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/249/

Offline validator:

http://htmlhelp.com/tools/validator/offline/index.html.en

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On Ubuntu/Debian you can just sudo apt-get install w3c-markup-validator –  Janus Troelsen May 20 '13 at 14:42
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I found this chrome extension very useful HTML Validator. It can validate a local page by submitting the source to W3C validator –  mrd3650 May 14 '14 at 7:30

If you're using firefox, this plugin is perfect:

http://users.skynet.be/mgueury/mozilla/

I use it all day. When you view source it shows you a list of errors and highlights them for you.

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A command line tool for validating a folder of html files: https://github.com/svenkreiss/html5validator

It integrates with CircleCI and TravisCI and can be used for validating Pelican and Jekyll sites.

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Perhaps the most straightforward way to do this, is the way I do it all the time. "View source" of the web page, select it all (ctrl+a), choose "copy" (crtl+c), tab over to the validator, and its "direct input" option, and paste it in (ctrl+v). Easy, peasy.

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What if you have to validate a website with hundreds of pages? Is it still that easy? I run a website where most of the content is generated from TeX by a not-very-reliable Perl script. When I make any changes to the script, I want to be sure I did not break anything. –  Palec Jan 26 at 10:15
    
If your site has hundreds of pages, it is likely generated by a CMS such as Wordpress, Drupal or such. So all you need to do is validate a random sample of pages, and you are insuring that your CMS-generated pages validate. If you need to validate each and every page, perhaps an automated mechanism is required, but that is neither a) the original question, nor b) the W3C validator. –  CLWill Jan 26 at 15:24
    
The original question asked how to validate HTML on local machine, it’s even in the title. You don’t answer that. I gave you an example of site where online validation is not feasible. Hard to guess why exactly the OP wanted the validator to run offline. –  Palec Jan 26 at 15:38
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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Huangism Jan 26 at 15:42
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The OP's question was "the W3C validator assumes a publicly available page", how can I use it to validate something on "localhost"? It does NOT ask "how can I validate pages on my local machine without access to the internet at all". I pointed out a simple, software-free, solution to the question that uses the W3C validator. –  CLWill Jan 26 at 18:56

http://validator.w3.org/#validate_by_upload if you don't mind uploading the HTML source file.

http://getfirebug.com/ if you're running Firefox can help with HTML validation issues as well.

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You can download a vnu.jar release for checking HTML5 documents offline. See https://github.com/validator/validator/releases/latest for the actual download file, and see https://validator.github.io/validator/ for more information

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