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I want using javascript to see if there is history or not, I mean if the back button is available on the browser or not.

Thanks

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7 Answers

up vote 41 down vote accepted

The only accurate way would be checking the property:

history.previous

However, the problem with this is that in most browsers this is considered a security violation and usually just returns undefined.

history.length

Is a property that others have suggested...
However, the length doesn't work completely because it doesn't indicate where in the history you are. Additionally, it doesn't always start at the same number. IE, for example, starts at 0 while Google Chrome starts at 1 (because of the landing page).

alt text

Most of the time a link is added that calls:

history.back();

or

 history.go(-1);

and it's just expected that if you can't go back then clicking the link does nothing.

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5  
It's because Google chrome assumes the landing page is a page in the history... –  Ron Reiter Oct 4 '11 at 16:42
2  
You've a little error here IE, for example, starts at 1 while Google Chrome starts at 0. –  hjpotter92 May 17 '13 at 9:22
    
oops - meant one thing, typed another. Thanks for the corrections. –  McAden Jun 13 '13 at 16:55
1  
if (history.length > 1) for me. –  tazo todua May 19 at 15:37
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There is another way to check - check the referrer. The first page usually will have an empty referrer...

if (document.referrer == "") {
    window.close()
} else {
    history.back()
}
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very good and working solution –  kajo May 3 '12 at 11:17
3  
The referrer is always empty when a page was not loaded by a link but by entering the URL into the address bar, or loading a bookmark. Such pages can sure have a history though, when the browser tab/window had loaded another page before! –  LonelyPixel Sep 19 '12 at 9:02
3  
Does not work for hash tag urls (ajax application). –  Joshua Nov 23 '12 at 20:33
7  
Does not work if a window was opened with target="_blank" to force a new window. The back button on the browser won't work, but there will be a document.referrer –  Mike_K Mar 26 '13 at 15:54
2  
Despite quite a few negative comments (all interesting gotchas to point out) I suspect this is a actually a good approach for many cases. –  Iain Collins Mar 30 at 1:35
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You can't directly check whether the back button is usable. You can look at history.length>0, but that will hold true if there are pages ahead of the current page as well. You can only be sure that the back button is unusable when history.length===0.

If that's not good enough, about all you can do is call history.back() and, if your page is still loaded afterwards, the back button is unavailable! Of course that means if the back button is available, you've just navigated away from the page. You aren't allowed to cancel the navigation in onunload, so about all you can do to stop the back actually happening is to return something from onbeforeunload, which will result in a big annoying prompt appearing. It's not worth it.

In fact it's normally a Really Bad Idea to be doing anything with the history. History navigation is for browser chrome, not web pages. Adding “go back” links typically causes more user confusion than it's worth.

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2  
regarding length - not even then in all browsers. Some browsers count the current page as a history item and start at 1. You'd have to include browser detection. –  McAden Aug 27 '10 at 22:04
    
Actually I thought it was always 1! The 0 was a brainfart, I thought browsers would always respond with 1 or more. Turns out Opera and IE think otherwise—good catch. –  bobince Aug 28 '10 at 0:21
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this seems to do the trick:

function goBackOrClose() {  

    window.history.back();
    window.close(); 

    //or if you are not interested in closing the window, do something else here
    //e.g. 
    theBrowserCantGoBack();

}

Call history.back() and then window.close(). If the browser is able to go back in history it won't be able to get to the next statement. If it's not able to go back, it'll close the window.

However, please note that if the page has been reached by typing a url, then firefox wont allow the script to close the window.

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1  
I've found this doesn't work unless I use a setTimeout with a delay of a few hundred milliseconds or so before trying to run the next statement, otherwise it'll run anyway after running history.back() –  Ken Fehling Apr 27 at 2:28
    
I haven't experienced that personally, which browser was it? –  xtrahelp.com May 1 at 17:21
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Although this is an old question, I think this will help people with the same question in the future.

My code let the browser go back one page, and if that fails it loads a fallback url. It also detect hashtags changes.

When the back button wasn't available, the fallback url will be loaded after 500 ms, so the browser has time enough to load the previous page. Loading the fallback url right after window.history.go(-1); would cause the browser to use the fallback url, because the js script didn't stop yet.

function historyBackWFallback(fallbackUrl) {
    fallbackUrl = fallbackUrl || '/';
    var prevPage = window.location.href;

    window.history.go(-1);

    setTimeout(function(){ if (window.location.href == prevPage) window.location.href = fallbackUrl; }, 500);
}
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Check if window.history.length is equal to 0.

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4  
depends on the browser –  McAden Aug 27 '10 at 22:08
4  
Not a good way, since history.length does not tell you where you are in the history... –  Ron Reiter Oct 4 '11 at 16:43
    
@Ron Reiter: Yes, I think the top answer and other comments for this question had already established that over a year ago... –  Cristian Sanchez Oct 6 '11 at 16:19
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I'm not sure if this works and it is completely untested, but try this:

<script type="text/javascript">

    function goBack() {
        history.back();
    }

    if (history.length > 0) { //if there is a history...
        document.getElementsByTagName('button')[].onclick="goBack()"; //assign function "goBack()" to all buttons onClick
    } else {
        die();
    }
</script>

And somewhere in HTML:

<button value="Button1"> //These buttons have no action
<button value="Button2">

EDIT:

What you can also do is to research what browsers support the back function (I think they all do) and use the standard JavaScript browser detection object found, and described thoroughly, on this page. Then you can have 2 different pages: one for the "good browsers" compatible with the back button and one for the "bad browsers" telling them to go update their browser

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2  
history.back is a function. You want to check if history.length > 0 then if it is go back with history.back() –  pixl coder Aug 27 '10 at 21:49
    
oh, thanks for the feedback –  Latze Aug 27 '10 at 21:52
3  
Also [] on a NodeList makes no sense, and you can't assign a string to an event handler. –  bobince Aug 27 '10 at 21:57
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