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repl.it : https://repl.it/BuXR/3

var str = "abc";
var str2 = str.split(" ").join("").split("");
var tmp = str2;
console.log(str2);
// => ['a','b','c']
console.log(tmp.reverse());
// => ['c','b','a']
console.log(str2);
// => ['c','b','a']

My question is why str2 is being changed even though it is not being reversed?

This is very upsetting to me, but I have a guess as to why this is happening. The tmp is just a pointer to the original str2, and when I call reverse() on tmp, it actually reverses str2.

Even if that really is what's happening, I still feel like it is a very counterintuitive way for a language to work.

share|improve this question
7  
possible duplicate of Copying array by value in JavaScript – Bergi Mar 9 at 5:09
4  
It's not a pointer to str2, but a pointer to the same array that str2 points to. – Bergi Mar 9 at 5:10
    
Yes you are right. Thank you for the link. – John Chen Mar 9 at 5:17
    
@NickSpriet string is not a reference type in JavaScript. str2 is an Array, not a string. It's not a very good name for that variable. – Patrick Roberts Mar 9 at 12:31
    
@JohnChen if this is counterintuitive to you, I recommend a language like MATLAB where pretty much everything is call-by-value. – Patrick Roberts Mar 9 at 12:35
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Your guess is right.

The tmp is just a pointer to the original str2, so whatever operations are performed on str2 it will be stored to memory and when you access tmp it find the reference to str2.

I have a guess as to why this is happening. The tmp is just a pointer to the original str2, and when I call reverse() on tmp, it actually reverses str2.

share|improve this answer
4  
Disc space? What? – user9993 Mar 9 at 13:54
    
"disc space" refers to the memory on the disc where the array is stored. Just think of a "disc" as a flat cloud that can you can hold in your hands. – iabw Mar 9 at 14:20
    
@user9993 I have changed the word Disc space to memory :) – Hemant Metalia Mar 9 at 15:17

2 Reasons why this is happening:

  • The reverse() method reverses an array in place, hence tmp is reversed: ref
  • The variable tmp and str2 are references to the same array instance, hence str2 also reversed.
share|improve this answer

My question is why str2 is being changed even though it is not being reversed?

Since the str2 and tmp are references which points to the same array. So whatever operation is done on tmp will be performed on string to which str2 is also pointing to.

If you want it to point it to another array then simply try

var tmp = [].concat(str2);
share|improve this answer
2  
str2 isn't actually a string. – Bergi Mar 9 at 5:09
    
@Bergi thanks for correction, I spotted the same after typing :) – gurvinder372 Mar 9 at 5:12
    
What is faster, [].concat(arr) or arr.slice(0)? – Gustavo Rodrigues Mar 9 at 13:51
    
@GustavoRodrigues looks about the same jsperf.com/duplicate-array-slice-vs-concat/29 – Austin Mar 9 at 14:47
    
In ES6 you can now use [...str2] – Patrick Roberts Mar 9 at 15:56

You need to create a new point on memory of the array:

Array.prototype.clone = function(){
    return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(this));
};
var arr = [1, 2, 3];
var arr_clone = arr.clone();
arr_clone.reverse();
console.log(arr_clone);
// [3,2,1]
console.log(arr);
// [1,2,3]
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