Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Since Python does not provide left/right versions of its comparison operators, how does it decide which function to call?

class A(object):
    def __eq__(self, other):
        print "A __eq__ called"
        return self.value == other
class B(object):
    def __eq__(self, other):
        print "B __eq__ called"
        return self.value == other

>>> a = A()
>>> a.value = 3
>>> b = B()
>>> b.value = 4
>>> a == b
"A __eq__ called"
"B __eq__ called"
False

This seems to call both __eq__ functions. Just looking for the official decision tree.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 26 down vote accepted

The a == b expression invokes A.__eq__, since it exists. Its code includes self.value == other. Since int's don't know how to compare themselves to B's, Python tries invoking B.__eq__ to see if it knows how to compare itself to an int.

If you amend your code to show what values are being compared:

class A(object):
    def __eq__(self, other):
        print "A __eq__ called: %r == %r ?" % (self, other)
        return self.value == other
class B(object):
    def __eq__(self, other):
        print "B __eq__ called: %r == %r ?" % (self, other)
        return self.value == other

a = A()
a.value = 3
b = B()
b.value = 4
a == b

it will print:

A __eq__ called: <__main__.A object at 0x013BA070> == <__main__.B object at 0x013BA090> ?
B __eq__ called: <__main__.B object at 0x013BA090> == 3 ?
share|improve this answer
3  
Absolutely right. And in summary, those tests should probably be "return self.value == other.value". –  Kirk Strauser Aug 28 '10 at 0:17
    
Thanks Ned! Just Some Guy: It depends on what you are looking for. For example, suppose I want: a == 3 and a == b to both be true (with b.value changed to 3). –  PyProg Aug 28 '10 at 0:48

When Python2.x sees a == b, it tries the following.

  • If type(b) is a new-style class, and type(b) is a subclass of type(a), and type(b) has overridden __eq__, then the result is b.__eq__(a).
  • If type(a) has overridden __eq__ (that is, type(a).__eq__ isn’t object.__eq__), then the result is a.__eq__(b).
  • If type(b) has overridden __eq__, then the result is b.__eq__(a).
  • If none of the above are the case, Python repeats the process looking for __cmp__. If it exists, the objects are equal iff it returns zero.
  • As a final fallback, Python calls object.__eq__(a, b), which is True iff a and b are the same object.

If any of the special methods return NotImplemented, Python acts as though the method didn’t exist.

Note that last step carefully: if neither a nor b overloads ==, then a == b is the same as a is b.


From http://me.veekun.com/blog/2012/03/24/python-faq-equality/

It'll help someone, hopefully.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.