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Does LINQ have a way to "memorize" its previous query results while querying?

Consider the following case:

public class Foo {
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Bar> Bars { get; set; }
}

public class Bar {
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

Now, if two or more Foo have same collection of Bar (no matter what the order is), they are considered as similar Foo.

Example:

foo1.Bars = new List<Bar>() { bar1, bar2 };
foo2.Bars = new List<Bar>() { bar2, bar1 };
foo3.Bars = new List<Bar>() { bar3, bar1, bar2 };

In the above case, foo1 is similar to foo2 but both foo1 and foo2 are not similar tofoo3

Given that we have a query result consisting IEnumerable or IOrderedEnumerable of Foo. From the query, we are to find the first N foo which are not similar.

This task seems to require a memory of the collection of bars which have been chosen before.

With partial LINQ we could do it like this:

private bool areBarsSimilar(ICollection<Bar> bars1, ICollection<Bar> bars2) {
    return bars1.Count == bars2.Count && //have the same amount of bars
        !bars1.Select(x => x.Id)
        .Except(bars2.Select(y => y.Id))
        .Any(); //and when excepted does not return any element mean similar bar
}

public void somewhereWithQueryResult(){
    .
    .
    List<Foo> topNFoos = new List<Foo>(); //this serves as a memory for the previous query
    int N = 50; //can be any number
    foreach (var q in query) { //query is IOrderedEnumerable or IEnumerable
        if (topNFoos.Count == 0 || !topNFoos.Any(foo => areBarsSimilar(foo.Bars, q.Bars)))
            topNFoos.Add(q);
        if (topNFoos.Count >= N) //We have had enough Foo
            break;
    }
}

The topNFoos List will serve as a memory of the previous query and we can skip the Foo q in the foreach loop which already have identical Bars with Any of the Foo in the topNFoos.

My question is, is there any way to do that in LINQ (fully LINQ)?

var topNFoos = from q in query
               //put something
               select q;

If the "memory" required is from a particular query item q or a variable outside of the query, then we could use let variable to cache it:

int index = 0;
var topNFoos = from q in query
               let qc = index++ + q.Id //depends on q or variable outside like index, then it is OK
               select q;

But if it must come from the previous querying of the query itself then things start to get more troublesome.

Is there any way to do that?


Edit:

(I currently am creating a test case (github link) for the answers. Still figuring out how can I test all the answers fairly)

(Most of the answers below are aimed to solve my particular question and are in themselves good (Rob's, spender's, and David B's answers which use IEqualityComparer are particularly awesome). Nevertheless, if there is anyone who can give answer to my more general question "does LINQ have a way to "memorize" its previous query results while querying", I would also be glad)

(Apart from the significant difference in performance for the particular case I presented above when using fully/partial LINQ, one answer aiming to answer my general question about LINQ memory is Ivan Stoev's. Another one with good combination is Rob's. As to make myself clearer, I look for general and efficient solution, if there is any, using LINQ)

share|improve this question
    
Your "Without LINQ" case seems to mainly use LINQ. – spender Mar 10 at 2:38
    
Is this fact Now, if two or more Foo have same collection of Bar (no matter what the order is), they are considered as similar Foo. considered true for your whole application, or only in this instance? – Rob Mar 10 at 2:39
    
@spender you are right, what I actually mean is partial LINQ, I should update that... – Ian Mar 10 at 2:40
    
So what are you actually trying to do? Group a sequence of Foo by the contents of their Bars collection? – spender Mar 10 at 2:43
1  
If the Bar collections will not/should not/don't need to contain duplicates, you might consider replacing them with a set based collection such as HashSet<Foo> that won't store duplicates. This, in turn, will make for much speedier comparisons of the two collections. – spender Mar 10 at 3:24
up vote 3 down vote accepted

So, it's ... possible. But this is far from performant code.

var res = query.Select(q => new {
    original = q, 
    matches = query.Where(innerQ => areBarsSimilar(q.Bars, innerQ.Bars))
}).Select(g => new { original = g, joinKey = string.Join(",", g.matches.Select(m => m.Id)) })
.GroupBy (g => g.joinKey)
.Select(g => g.First().original.original)
.Take(N);

This assumes that the Ids are unique for each Foo (you could also use their GetHashCode(), I suppose).

A much better solution is to either keep what you've done, or implement a custom comparer, as follows:


Note: As pointed out in the comments by @spender, the below Equals and GetHashCode will not work for collections with duplicates. Refer to their answer for a better implementation - however, the usage code would remain the same


class MyComparer : IEqualityComparer<Foo>
{
    public bool Equals(Foo left, Foo right)
    {
        return left.Bars.Count() == right.Bars.Count() && //have the same amount of bars
            left.Bars.Select(x => x.Id)
            .Except(right.Bars.Select(y => y.Id))
            .ToList().Count == 0; //and when excepted returns 0, mean similar bar
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Foo foo)
    {
        unchecked {
            int hc = 0;
            if (foo.Bars != null)
                foreach (var p in foo.Bars)
                hc ^= p.GetHashCode();
            return hc;
        }
    }
}

And then your query becomes simply:

var res = query
    .GroupBy (q => q, new MyComparer())
    .Select(g => g.First())
    .Take(N);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, please give me some time to look through this and the other answer, you have got my upvote for the significant effort though... – Ian Mar 10 at 3:11
    
Hah! I took the same approach and was just looking up the GroupBy syntax. Beware the case where there are unmatched numbers of duplicates in the Bars collection, because your GetHashCode implementation is not consistent with the set based operations of the Equals implementation. I chose to do a SequenceEqual instead to ensure that the hashcode and equals implementations are in complete agreement. – spender Mar 10 at 3:12
1  
@spender Yep - you're right, I was a bit lazy and just used the original Equals implementation (mainly an example of the IEqualityComparer). I'd definitely go with your answer though, much cleaner implementation of the Equals and it's consistent – Rob Mar 10 at 3:13
    
@Rob your answer answers most of my concern, giving examples, and having pretty good performance. :) – Ian Mar 13 at 3:16

I'm not going to answer your question directly, but rather, propose a method that will be fairly optimally efficient for filtering the first N non-similar items.

First, consider writing an IEqualityComparer<Foo> that uses the Bars collection to measure equality. Here, I'm assuming that the lists might contain duplicate entries, so have quite a strict definition of similarity:

public class FooSimilarityComparer:IEqualityComparer<Foo>
{
    public bool Equals(Foo a, Foo b)
    {
        //called infrequently
        return a.Bars.OrderBy(bar => bar.Id).SequenceEqual(b.Bars.OrderBy(bar => bar.Id));
    }
    public int GetHashCode(Foo foo)
    {
        //called frequently
        unchecked
        {
            return foo.Bars.Sum(b => b.GetHashCode());
        }
    }
}

You can really efficiently get the top N non-similar items by using a HashSet with the IEqualityComparer above:

IEnumerable<Foo> someFoos; //= some list of Foo
var hs = new HashSet<Foo>(new FooSimilarityComparer());
foreach(var f in someFoos)
{
    hs.Add(f); //hashsets don't add duplicates, as measured by the FooSimilarityComparer
    if(hs.Count >= 50)
    {
        break;
    }
}

@Rob s approach above is broadly similar, and shows how you can use the comparer directly in LINQ, but pay attention to the comments I made to his answer.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the answer, please give me some time to look through this and the other answer, you have got my upvote for the significant effort though... – Ian Mar 10 at 3:11
    
Is the sum of hashes a good hash? Would a folded/aggregated bitwise-XOR produce better results? – Mephy Mar 10 at 4:22
1  
@Mephy aggregating xor in the case of duplicates would be disastrous to a reliable hash – spender Mar 10 at 4:27
IEnumerable<Foo> dissimilarFoos =
  from foo in query
  let key = string.Join('|',
    from bar in foo.Bars
    order by bar.Id
    select bar.Id.ToString())
  group foo by key into g
  select g.First();

IEnumerable<Foo> firstDissimilarFoos =
  dissimilarFoos.Take(50);

Sometimes, you may not like the behavior of groupby in the above queries. At the time the query is enumerated, groupby will enumerate the entire source. If you only want partial enumeration, then you should switch to Distinct and a Comparer:

class FooComparer : IEqualityComparer<Foo>
{
  private string keyGen(Foo foo)
  {
    return string.Join('|',
      from bar in foo.Bars
      order by bar.Id
      select bar.Id.ToString());
  }
  public bool Equals(Foo left, Foo right)
  {
    if (left == null || right == null) return false;
    return keyGen(left) == keyGen(right);
  }
  public bool GetHashCode(Foo foo)
  {
    return keyGen(foo).GetHashCode();
  }
}

then write:

IEnumerable<Foo> dissimilarFoos = query.Distinct(new FooComparer());
IEnumerable<Foo> firstDissimilarFoos = dissimilarFoos.Take(50);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, I currently am writing a test case to evaluate all the answers. Please give me some time to look through this and the other answers, you have got my upvote for the significant effort though... – Ian Mar 10 at 4:18

Idea. You might be able to hack something by devising your own fluent interface of mutators over a cache that you'd capture in "let x = ..." clauses, along the lines of,

from q in query
let qc = ... // your cache mechanism here
select ...

but I suspect you'll have to be careful to limit the updates to your cache to those "let ..." only, as I doubt the implementation of the standard Linq operators and extensions methods will be happy if you allow such side effects to happen in their back through predicates applied in the "where", or "join", "group by", etc, clauses.

'HTH,

share|improve this answer
    
ah yes, I wonder what could be in the qc=... actually. :) if it is a variable resulting from a particular query item q or a variable outside the query, then it should be OK. But if it must come from the previous querying of the query itself then things start to get more troublesome. And that is the point of the question actually. :) – Ian Mar 10 at 2:36

I guess by "full LINQ" you mean standard LINQ operators/Enumerable extension methods.

I don't think this can be done with LINQ query syntax. From standard methods the only one that supports mutable processing state is Enumerable.Aggregate, but it gives you nothing more than a LINQ flavor over the plain foreach:

var result = query.Aggregate(new List<Foo>(), (list, next) =>
{
    if (list.Count < 50 && !list.Any(item => areBarsSimilar(item.Bars, next.Bars)))
        list.Add(next);
    return list;
});

Since looks like we are allowed to use helper methods (like areBarsSimilar), the best we can do is to make it at least look more LINQ-ish by defining and using a custom extension method

var result = query.Aggregate(new List<Foo>(), (list, next) => list.Count < 50 && 
    !list.Any(item => areBarsSimilar(item.Bars, next.Bars)) ? list.Concat(next) : list);

where the custom method is

public static class Utils
{
    public static List<T> Concat<T>(this List<T> list, T item) { list.Add(item); return list; }
}

But note that compared to vanilla foreach, Aggregate has an additional drawback of not being able to exit earlier, thus will consume the whole input sequence (which besides the performance also means it doesn't work with infinite sequences).

Conclusion: While this should answer your original question, i.e. it's technically possible to do what you are asking for, LINQ (like the standard SQL) is not well suited for such type of processing.

share|improve this answer
    
This gives me one more answer to evaluate! please give me some time to look through this and the other answers, you have got my upvote for the significant effort though. :) (and, it is you again!) – Ian Mar 10 at 3:42
    
@Ian Yeah, it's me again:) But seriously, I think the subject of the question has changed significantly. Most of the answers are trying to solve the concrete issue in a most effective way, and I saw you are preparing a performance tests. That's not fair because it's comparing apples to oranges. There are pretty good solutions, but for a different question, most probably under algorithms and performance tags. – Ivan Stoev Mar 10 at 9:44
    
Good to see you - alive and active. :) You are right in saying that my original question was to find the solution in general, rather than solution in particular. I merely put the particular solution because it can give picture to the general question. Nevertheless, it is also true that the reason why I am trying to find general solution is because I think it could be more efficient, which is also part of my original concern. That's why I think your solution still answer essential part of my question. But of the other part, a test might be required. This is why I create a test. – Ian Mar 10 at 13:05
1  
I also think it's a good general problem, but I doubt that pure LINQ solution can beat a good specifically engineered data structure/algorithm (like the HashSet solution by @spender). Anyway, good to see you too! And slow down a bit man, we can't catch you up :) Just kidding, cheers and happy coding! – Ivan Stoev Mar 10 at 13:25
1  
ah yes, you are right! Any() seems like you are truly a master of Any() ;) – Ian Mar 10 at 13:31

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