Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I made some tests using the spirit mini_c sample. Unfortunately it does not keep the operator precedence as expected:

int main()
{
    return 3 > 10 || 3 > 1;
}

evaluates to 0.

return (3 > 10) || (3 > 1);

returns 1

I tried to move the definition of "||" and "&&" to the very top in the constructor of

template <typename Iterator>
expression<Iterator>::expression(

but that does not change anything. How can that be fixed. I am using boost 1.3.38.

share|improve this question
    
I've never used Boost.Spirit, but I don't see how anything it defines could possibly make a difference here. You have nothing but primitives, and you can't overload the built in operators. –  Dennis Zickefoose Aug 28 '10 at 15:42
    
I have another question considering this sample. Maybe you can help with that too ? stackoverflow.com/questions/3591533/… –  RED SOFT ADAIR Aug 28 '10 at 16:37
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Confirmed, that's a bug in the mini_c example related to operator precedence. I committed a fix to SVN, which will be available in Boost V1.45. Here is what I changed in the header file mini_cb.hpp:

old code:

equality_expr =
    relational_expr
    >> *(   ("==" > relational_expr     [op(op_eq)])
        |   ("!=" > relational_expr     [op(op_neq)])
        )
    ;

relational_expr =
    logical_expr
    >> *(   ("<=" > logical_expr        [op(op_lte)])
        |   ('<' > logical_expr         [op(op_lt)])
        |   (">=" > logical_expr        [op(op_gte)])
        |   ('>' > logical_expr         [op(op_gt)])
        )
    ;

logical_expr =
    additive_expr
    >> *(   ("&&" > additive_expr       [op(op_and)])
        |   ("||" > additive_expr       [op(op_or)])
        )
    ;

new code:

equality_expr =
    logical_expr
    >> *(   ("==" > logical_expr        [op(op_eq)])
        |   ("!=" > logical_expr        [op(op_neq)])
        )
    ;

logical_expr =
    relational_expr
    >> *(   ("&&" > relational_expr     [op(op_and)])
        |   ("||" > relational_expr     [op(op_or)])
        )
    ;

relational_expr =
    additive_expr
    >> *(   ("<=" > additive_expr       [op(op_lte)])
        |   ('<' > additive_expr        [op(op_lt)])
        |   (">=" > additive_expr       [op(op_gte)])
        |   ('>' > additive_expr        [op(op_gt)])
        )
    ;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. I tried the same, but i forgot to modify the parameters inside the definitions. –  RED SOFT ADAIR Aug 28 '10 at 16:28
1  
Hello Hartmut. Today - 1 1/2 Years later i found out, that the code is still not correct: "==" and "&&" must be evaluated at last - AFTER "==" and "!=", not before. –  RED SOFT ADAIR Feb 27 '12 at 15:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.