Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've just written a recursive function and it dawned on me that all the variables I use within the function will remain allocated in memory until recursion breaks. If I am recursing a large number of times or allocating large amounts of memory for variables not used in the consequent recursive function call, could this lead to alot of wasteful memory use?

E.g. in the following, only vec2 is used in the following recurse and temp_int and temp_vec will continue to occupy memory needlessly.

int recurse(std::vector<int> arg_vec) {
  int temp_int i;

  std::vector<int> temp_vec;
  std::vector<int> vec2;

  //... do some processing with arg_vec and temp_vec and result is stored in vec2
  recurse(vec2)

  return if (some condition met);
}

Should I then be allocating all memory using the new commands and deleting them before the function call? Or is there some other method for dealing with this

share|improve this question
1  
switch to Haskell –  Nate Aug 28 '10 at 20:45
1  
If you move the condition to the top of the function. Then you have tail recursion. Tail recursion can easily be converted into a loop. –  Loki Astari Aug 28 '10 at 21:19

7 Answers 7

You can use scope braces to specify a scope. Anything declared in a scope is destroyed at the end of the scope.

int recurse(std::vector<int> arg_vec) {
  int temp_int i;

  std::vector<int> vec2;
  {
    std::vector<int> temp_vec;

    //... do some processing with arg_vec and temp_vec and result is stored in vec2
  } // temp_vec is destructed here. vec2 is not because it is outside this scope.
  recurse(ec2)

  return if (some condition met);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm just picking, but your bail-if-statement has to come before your recursive call. –  Mads Elvheim Aug 28 '10 at 20:44
    
+1, many people forget about arbitrary scopes. Edit@Mads: The OP's code had this in, he probably just copied and pasted. –  Puppy Aug 28 '10 at 20:45
4  
This won't normally make any difference to stack usage. At least in the code I've looked at, the storage for all local variables in a function was allocated on entry to the function, and released on exit. The vector must be destroyed on exit from the block, but the memory it uses on the stack will remain allocated until the function returns (at least in every case I've ever seen -- and I'd be surprised to see that change, as it would require code similar to a nested function if you created a new stack from for a block). –  Jerry Coffin Aug 28 '10 at 20:54
1  
I second Jerry here, the braces are meant to force the destructors to be run, memory allocation is not stated within the standard and the compilers are free to do as they wish (and often allocate everything in one block, because it's just faster). The good thing though is that in the case of vector, running the destructor does deallocate the dynamic memory it allocated. –  Matthieu M. Aug 29 '10 at 11:18

Typically, what you do in this situation is tail-recursion, which allows the compiler to optimise just that.

That means, the last thing your recursive function does is calling itself. I am not aware how good the optimisation is if you have further instructions.

Edit (clarification)

int foo(int i) {
  if (stop_condition(i))
    return stuff;
  // fancy computation
  return foo(bar);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 beat me to it –  Chris Thompson Aug 28 '10 at 20:41

You could free the array-memory of temp_vec before entering the recursion.

Not via

temp_vec.clear();

since the standard does not guarantees that clear() frees the allocated array memory

std::swap(temp_vec. std::vector<int>());

Anyways, using another scope for temp_vec is more useful in that example, since after leaving the scope the space of the vector object itself is freed on the stack. See the other answer.

Btw, consider instead of using call-by-value

int recurse(std::vector<int> arg_vec) {

call by reference to avoid unnecessary vector copying:

int recurse(const std::vector<int> &arg_vec) {
share|improve this answer
1  
sizeof(temp_vec) will still remain on the stack. –  Nick Strupat Aug 28 '10 at 20:41
    
@SilverSun: this is true, using scopes is actually a better solution in this example –  maxschlepzig Aug 28 '10 at 20:47
    
the swap idiom is the only one guaranteed to deallocate the vector; int x = a.capacity(); a.clear(); assert(x == a.capacity() passes in most STL implementations I know –  Carlos Scheidegger Aug 28 '10 at 20:53
    
@DanielTrebbien beat me to it :) –  Carlos Scheidegger Aug 28 '10 at 20:54
    
@Daniel Trebbien: Thanks for the clarification, will edit it. –  maxschlepzig Aug 28 '10 at 20:54

Applications tend to have more heap memory than stack, so you could allocate instead of using automatic storage. This is what you're already doing when you use std::vector. Allocation can be slow though. To get the best of both worlds, rewrite your recursive function by using iteration instead. Then you can pre-allocate once, and re-allocate in the event you use up the preallocated space.

share|improve this answer

Tail calls can be optimized to consume no additional stack space at all, making them as memory-effective and (circa, depending on other factores) fast as the iterative version. All modern C and C++ compilers perform this optimization. And even if it is not a tail call, the compiler may work out an optimized version without recusion. In this answer, someone proofed gcc will turn a naive factorial implementation in a fast iteration even on -O2.

share|improve this answer

You COULD allocate everything with new, but it might be easier to move the code doing the actual processing into another function with its own locals. Something like this:

void subfunction(vector arg_vec, vector result_vec)
{
   int temp_int;
   vector temp_vec;

   // do stuff
   return;
}

int recurse(vector arg_vec) {
   vector vec2;

   subfunction(arg_vec, vec2);
   recurse(vec2);
}

As a bonus, now you're halfway to turning the recursion into a loop, which is a better way to handle things if you're recursing enough that stack space might be an issue.

share|improve this answer

Changing to manually allocating a couple of std::vectors isn't going to make much difference. A vector is really a pretty small data structure (typically two size_ts plus one pointer) -- the storage for the actual data is allocated dynamically already. Therefore, allocating an std::vector dynamically is only likely to save you something like two size_ts per stack frame. If you're right on the ragged edge of something working or not, that might make a real difference, but I'd guess it's pretty rare (and if you are that close, you should probably be looking at other possibilities first).

share|improve this answer
    
Right, freeing the content as max suggests is probably good enough. –  Ben Voigt Aug 28 '10 at 20:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.