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I was trying to validate my User model data and I came upon this problem.

Say i have the following validation rules, stored in $validate variable:

var $validate=array(
        "username" => array(
            "usernameCheckForRegister" => array(
                "rule" => ..., 
                "message" => ...
            ),
            "usernameCheckForLogin" => array(
                "rule" => ...,
                "message" => ...
            )
        ),
        //rules for other fields
    );

In the UsersController controller, I have two actions: register() and login(). The problem is, how do I validate the username field in the register() action using ONLY the usernameCheckForRegister rule, and how do I validate the username field in the login() action, using the other rule, usernameCheckForLogin? Is there any behaviour or method in CakePHP which allows me to choose which set of rules to apply to a form field when validating?

Thank you in advance for your help!

share|improve this question
    
My questions would be why you'd want to validate the username upon login? When logging in, the only question that needs to be answered is "does this username with this password exist in the database?" It shouldn't matter whether the username is valid or not. If it isn't, the login will fail because the username doesn't exist anyway. –  deceze Aug 30 '10 at 3:44
    
The reason I'd want to validate the username upon login is because I'm using also a client-side validation, which will tell the user whether or not he has left the username field empty. –  Andrei Horak Aug 30 '10 at 8:15
    
Sorry, still not getting it. :) A generic "Invalid Login Information" message should be enough, possibly even better. Cake model validation settings are to ensure that only validated data is saved to the database. When logging in you're not saving anything to the database though, so you shouldn't be using the validation rules. If you just want to warn the user about an empty input, do it straight without using the models validation rules. –  deceze Aug 30 '10 at 8:26
    
When a user logs in, I save some user-specific data into the database, so yes, I save something when a user logs in. And to be more user-friendly, I display custom messages like "You didn't fill in the username" or "The username you have entered does not match any in our database", so that users won't have to refresh ten times the login field before they finally manage to login. Anyway, what do you mean by "do it straight without using the models validation rules"? Why shouldn't I use the model validation rules Cake comes with and define my own? –  Andrei Horak Aug 30 '10 at 15:37
    
Because, as I said, model validation rules are not meant to produce error messages for form fields. They only do so as a convenient side effect. Their primary purpose is to limit the type of data that goes into your database. They model your business rules, not your form fields. Models don't care about form fields at all. And for logins, it's better to have only one generic error message. The more detailed you are, the more attack surface you give to potential attackers. It's a lot more informative for an attacker to be told "incorrect username" than simply "login failed". –  deceze Aug 30 '10 at 23:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think I ran over the solution that fits my needs.

http://bakery.cakephp.org/articles/view/multivalidatablebehavior-using-many-validation-rulesets-per-model

Instead of defining several rules for each field, this behaviour implies defining several "general" rules under which you define all your field-related rules.

So, instead of doing:

var $validate=array(
    "username" => array(
        "usernameCheckForRegister" => array(
            "rule" => ..., 
            "message" => ...
        ),
        "usernameCheckForLogin" => array(
            "rule" => ...,
            "message" => ...
        )
    ),
    //rules for other fields
);

you do:

/**
 * Default validation ruleset
 */
var $validate = array(
        'username' => /* rules */,
        'password' => /* rules */,
        'email' => /* rules */
    );

/**
 * Custom validation rulesets
 */
var $validationSets = array(
    'register' => array(
        'username' => /* rules */,
        'password' => /* rules */,
        'email' => /* rules */,
    ),
    'login' => array(
        'username' => /* rules */,
        'password' => /* rules */
    )
); 

And then in your controller you toggle between validation sets like this:$this->User->setValidation('register');

Even though you have to write a little bit more code, I think this solution best fits my needs

share|improve this answer
    
if such type of solution is also exist for bindig rule per action? –  Desert P Jun 30 '14 at 11:39

Check the manual:

var $validate=array(
        "username" => array(
            "usernameCheckForRegister" => array(
                "rule" => ..., 
                "message" => ...,
                "on" => "create"
            ),
            "usernameCheckForLogin" => array(
                "rule" => ...,
                "message" => ...,
                "on" => "update"
            )
        ),
        //rules for other fields
    );

UPDATE: Oh... I just noticed that it seems impossible to use validation rule on login unless you update the user at each login attempt. You can modify login() method to verify the username instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Still, I don't think that will be a clean solution. I was rather looking for something like $this->useValidationRule("usernameCheckForRegister"); –  Andrei Horak Aug 29 '10 at 8:17

Bit of a clunky solution but I've just been unsetting the ones I don't use from within the Controller. Could get messy but for a simple login/register it does the trick.

unset($this->User->validate['username']['usernameCheckForRegister']);
share|improve this answer
    
The solution works, but I'd prefer something more flexible, as I'll be using many validation-rules sets. –  Andrei Horak Sep 12 '10 at 13:24

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