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I have a C (not C++) struct that goes like this

typedef struct mystruct{
float a,b;
int x, y;
} mystruct;

Then in a function I collect data like this:

mystruct List[MAX];
ListNumber = 0;

for(i = 0; i < MAX; i++)
{
 if(conditions_meet)
 {
  List[ListNumber].a = masterlist[i].a;

...etc

ListNumber++;
 }
}

then I send the array to a function

 DoStuff(static int max, mystruct array[max]){
  Stuff
 }

This works, but when I try to do it like this....

mystruct setter(int i)
{
mystruct TEMP;
TEMP.a = masterlist[i].a;
 //......etc
return TEMP;
}


mystruct List[MAX];
ListNumber = 0;

for(i = 0; i < MAX; i++)
{
 if(conditions_meet)
 {
  List[ListNumber] = setter(i);
  ListNumber++;
 }
}

It causes a lot of funky errors. Why is this happening? edit: @tommieb75 I can't give much detail, the results do not seem to have a pattern. The list is used as a generalized way to draw stuff to the screen, and having the function instead of the direct setting makes odd problems in rendering -and random-, but produce no compiler errors at all. gdb shows some integers as being larger than an integer, that's the only pattern I find. masterlist is a global array of another struct. The data needs to be converted to the struct in this example. No compiler warnings or errors at all. I can turn in more sensitive warnings maybe, but I always get reported of any general error I can think. I am going to try the selected solution, that should suffice. Anyway similar functions returning structs are used in my code and all work perfectly except for this case with an array of structs.

share|improve this question
1  
Could you post some of the errors you are getting? –  GameFreak Aug 28 '10 at 21:54
    
Someone refresh my memory: Can you return structs by value in C? –  user180326 Aug 28 '10 at 21:56
2  
why not? pointers should be faster, but you could return by value. Btw. www.ideone.com and you could check ;-) –  nilphilus Aug 28 '10 at 21:59
    
@nilphilus: that's an excellent linky! +1 from me for that! Cool!!! Should put in a clause - please check your code on that site first and make sure it works before posting here! eh? :P –  t0mm13b Aug 28 '10 at 22:10
    
@GameFreak Errors seem to be memory corruption, where at times instead of one int I get 10923801293812 or stuff like that. –  Balkania Aug 28 '10 at 23:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For a simple setting a struct member you need a copy from an entire struct-element?

mystruct List[MAX];
ListNumber = 0;

for(i = 0; i < MAX; i++)
{
 if(conditions_meet)
 {
  List[ListNumber].a = masterlist[i].a;
  ListNumber++;
 }
}

If you really need a function, use the destination-memory as parameter like:

void setter(mystruct *dest,const mystruct *src)
{
  dest->a = src->a; 
}
for(i = 0; i < MAX; i++)
{
 if(conditions_meet)
 {
  setter( &List[ListNumber], &masterlist[i] );
  ListNumber++;
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the function is to clean up the function a bit, it's a massive eyesore hard to read and alter in a speedy manner. However this seems to be an interesting solution, I am going to test it out. –  Balkania Aug 29 '10 at 23:06

what is

mystruct setter(i)
{
mystruct TEMP;
TEMP.a = masterlist[i].a;

'i' has any type?

//If you get errors with uninitialized members in struct that could help http://ideone.com/WRLVG

share|improve this answer
1  
It's implicitly int. –  Potatoswatter Aug 28 '10 at 22:20
    
@Potatoswatter arguments too? i remember about return values, but not arguments (anyway you are right) –  nilphilus Aug 28 '10 at 22:34

The first problem is your definition of setter is not a legal function signature. The parameter i must be given a type

mystruct setter(int i) {
  ...
}

It also uses the variable masterlist which is not defined in the function. This may be legally declared elsewhere as a static. If not though it will need to be accessible to the function in some way

share|improve this answer
    
Masterlist is a global. I don't know the proper name in C, though...anyway the code I typed was mostly made on-the-fly, it would have been too large otherwise. –  Balkania Aug 28 '10 at 23:02
    
Also that wasn't copy-paste of actual code, I just made an example on the fly to remove all surrounding noise...of course the real thing's got that right, or my compiler would complain ;P –  Balkania Aug 28 '10 at 23:09
    
@Blakania: You're not going to get any useful answers, since your made-up example seems to have left out the actual problem. –  caf Aug 29 '10 at 11:51
    
The parameter doesn't need to be given a type, it is implicitly int. –  dreamlax Aug 29 '10 at 23:11
    
@caf I don't see how that is the case, I just forgot to add a type -something excusable because I was coding in Lua before typing the post-, the problem is about using a function returning a struct into an array of structs, not about a missing integer declaration that the compiler points out faster than you can say "oops I forgot the type". –  Balkania Aug 29 '10 at 23:12

The problem is that within the setter function you have a stack allocated variable TEMP which goes out of scope once the function returns... you might be better to allocate the pointer to my_struct on the heap and return the address of it back out to the calling routine...

Edit:

mystruct *setter(int i){
    mystruct *ptr_myStruct;
    ptr_myStruct = malloc(sizeof(mystruct));
    if (ptr_myStruct != NULL){
        ptr_myStruct->a = masterlist[i].a
        // etc...
        return &ptr_myStruct;
    }
    return NULL;
}

mystruct List[MAX];
ListNumber = 0;

for(i = 0; i < MAX; i++)
{
 if(conditions_meet)
 {
  List[ListNumber] = setter(i);
  ListNumber++;
 }
}

That is what is needed to get the values back out once the routine goes out of scope. That is called return-by-reference

share|improve this answer
    
It's returned by value. –  Potatoswatter Aug 28 '10 at 22:21
    
Difference between return-by-value and return-by-reference...which is what I am stating above, by returning back the address to the allocated pointer on the heap that is return by reference. –  t0mm13b Aug 28 '10 at 22:58
    
If it were returning by reference, there would be a problem, but fortunately, C doesn't have that feature. If return by value didn't work, they probably would not have allowed it to compile. –  Potatoswatter Aug 28 '10 at 23:28
    
@Potatoswatter: change the prototype to this my_struct* setter(int i){... malloc the pointer to my_struct... return ptr to my_struct and there you have - return by reference.... –  t0mm13b Aug 28 '10 at 23:40
    
@tommieb75: Why return &ptr_myStruct;? When ptr_myStruct is already a pointer, and setter() is supposed to return a pointer. Therefore, don't you think return ptr_myStruct; is enough? The & will make it double pointer when setter() is supposed to return single pointer. Kindly explain. Thanks –  Andrew-Dufresne Aug 29 '10 at 3:25

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