Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm a complete noob with dynamically allocated memory. Will this have a memory leak or any other memory problem?

#include <iostream.h>

template <class T> class stack
{
         struct node
         {
                T value;
                node* next;
         };

         public:
                stack()
                {
                       size = 0;
                }

                ~stack()
                {
                       while(size > 0)
                       {
                           node *n = top->next;
                           delete top;
                           top = n;
                           size--;
                       }
                }

                void push(T value)
                {
                     node *n = new node;
                     n->value = value;

                     if(size == 0)
                     {
                          top = n;
                     }
                     else
                     {
                         n->next = top;
                         top = n;
                     }

                     size++;
                }

                T pop()
                {
                       if(size<1)
                       {
                            std::cerr<<"Stack underflow"<<endl;
                            exit(0);
                       }
                       else
                       {
                           node* n = top;
                           int val = n->value;
                           top = n->next;

                           delete n;
                           size--;

                           return val;
                       }
                }

                int getSize()
                {
                    return size;
                }

        private:
                int size;
                node *top;
};
share|improve this question
2  
<iostream.h> is wrong -- you should be using <iostream> instead. Also, this smells like homework -- otherwise you'd be using std::stack<t>. –  Billy ONeal Aug 28 '10 at 23:57
    
Not homework; I just needed some way to learn memory management. –  Eric Aug 28 '10 at 23:59
2  
@eric: In production C++ code, you almost never want to be managing memory manually. You should delegate that responsibility to STL containers, std::auto_ptr, some form of shared_ptr, or some form of scoped_ptr. –  Billy ONeal Aug 29 '10 at 0:02
    
Ok. I'll look into that. –  Eric Aug 29 '10 at 0:04
1  
Two style suggestions: if you initialize top to null in the constructor, you don't have to handle the empty stack case separately in push(). Also, you can implement the destructor in terms of pop(), cutting out more duplicate code. –  James McNellis Aug 29 '10 at 0:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't see any memory management errors -- but I do see several other kinds of errors. For example, what happens when T is something other than int? :)

Also, implementing a stack as a linked list is wasteful and will perform relatively poorly when compared to a deque or vector implementation like that used by std::stack.

share|improve this answer
    
Er... I'm not sure. I tested it with ints and chars.. Anyways, thank you! –  Eric Aug 29 '10 at 0:03
    
@eric: That's because char is convertible to int. The error is in your pop function. –  Billy ONeal Aug 29 '10 at 0:03
    
Oh, right. I see that now. Stupid me, thanks! –  Eric Aug 29 '10 at 0:07
    
@Martin: That was just an error in the code (int val = n->value; should have been T val = n->value;). –  James McNellis Aug 29 '10 at 3:05

In addition to the other excellent answers, one more note:

if(size<1)
{
    std::cerr<<"Stack underflow"<<endl;
    exit(0);
}

I would suggest thinking about either an assert or an exception here. exit is a bit rash, but if you decide to exit, do not exit with 0: that typically indicates success, which is the last thing you want in an error.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed -- should probably be throwing an exception here instead. +1. –  Billy ONeal Aug 29 '10 at 3:19

You missed the copy constructor/assignment operator of Stack.

When you create objects of Stack::Node you do not always initialization the next member. Write constructor destructor for stack node and everything else becomes simple.

#include <iostream.h>

template <class T> class stack
{
         /*
          * The stack object contains a RAW pointer (top)
          * So when the object is copied with either copy constructor or
          * assignment operator when need to handle that fact. The simplist way
          * to handle is to make sure it can not happen. To do this make them
          * private (You do not need to define them as they can't be used).
          */
         Stack(Stack const&);            // Not defined
         Stack operator=)(Stack const&); // Not defined

         struct Node
         {
                // Initialize Node
                Node(Node* n, T v)
                  :next(v)
                  ,value(v)
                {}
                ~Node() // Destroy whole chain.
                {    delete next;
                }
                // Data
                T     value;
                Node* next;
         };

         public:
                stack()
                   :size(0)
                   ,top(NULL)
                {}

                ~stack()
                {
                    /// destructor is now simple
                    delete top;
                }

                void push(T value)
                {
                   /// As is the push.
                     top  = new node(top, value);
                     ++size;
                }

                T pop()
                {
                    /// The pop is just the same.
                       if(size<1)
                       {
                            std::cerr<<"Stack underflow"<<endl;
                            exit(0);
                       }
                       else
                       {
                           node* n   = top;
                           T     val = n->value;
                           top       = n->next;
                           n->next   = NULL;    // Set to NULL to stop the delete chaining.

                           delete n;
                           size--;

                           return val;
                       }
                }

                // Make this method a constant.
                // As it does not change the object.
                int getSize() const
                {
                    return size;
                }

        private:
                int size;
                node *top;
};
share|improve this answer
    
It would be nice to null Node::next in the destructor. –  C Johnson Aug 29 '10 at 1:49
2  
@C Johnson: Why? its a complete waste of time as after the destructor the variable does not exist; and it does not add clarity or safety. –  Loki Astari Aug 29 '10 at 2:03

a few other tips:

instead of simulating the stack internally just use a normal list where you have a pointer to the first and last element of the list, there is no need to mimic a stack internally as long as you provide the push/pop functionality.

i would also skip the 'size' member altogether, instead just count the nodes in the list. this way you don't need to keep the size counter and the list synchronized. Just make sure you initialize the pointers to NULL. calculating size would then look something like:

for(Node* p=first; p!=NULL; p=p->next) ++size;
share|improve this answer
1  
Well, your size calculation will work, so no -1 from me. But the performance of that is really bad: it's O(n). So if someone used getSize() as exit condition in a for loop performance would become O(n*n) ... like when people use strlen(): simple mistake, horrible performance ... try not to encourage that when building an API. –  Zan Lynx Aug 29 '10 at 1:41
    
My answer is relating to OP's question i.e. memory management. You are right of course about the performance –  CyberSpock Aug 29 '10 at 2:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.