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So I have a file that in short has this problem...

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
package Foo;

use strict;
use POSIX;

...

sub remove {
  ...
}
...

and I get a get an error saying the subroutine remove has been redefined. I know the problem, there is a subroutine called remove in POSIX. However, I don't know how to handle it. How is this problem typically solved?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

do this:

use POSIX ();

which will stop the export all default functionality of the POSIX module. You will then need to prefix all POSIX methods with POSIX:: such as:

POSIX::remove(filename)

for the POSIX remove function.

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Thanks. Is this conventional? –  floogads Aug 29 '10 at 3:08
1  
Yes, in general to avoid conflicting subroutine definitions its best to import nothing or only those subroutines you are sure will have unique names. –  ennuikiller Aug 29 '10 at 3:17
4  
@floogads, it's more usual to say use POSIX qw(mkfifo modf); where you explicitly list all the functions you want to import. That way, you don't have to use the POSIX:: prefix all over, and you don't have to worry about conflicts with subroutine names in your program. –  cjm Aug 29 '10 at 3:48

The other way to suppress this warning is to put your subroutine redefinition inside a no warnings 'redefine' block:

{
    no warnings 'redefine';
    sub remove { ... }
}
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You can exclude certain symbols from being normally exported with the '!name' directive (see perldoc Exporter), e.g.:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
package Foo;

use strict;
use POSIX '!remove';

...

sub remove {
  ...
}
...
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I didn't know about the '!name' directive! Neat! –  Jim Davis Aug 30 '10 at 17:50

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