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I am writing a perl script, and in the part where I am checking the options that the user supplied on the command line, I want to exit with an error explaining what was wrong with the options. In this case, there is no need for a stack trace to go along with this error message. So what is the best way to die with an error message but no stack trace or debug information?

I've tried the following:

die "Invalid options";

which produces

Invalid options at myscript.pl line 49.

Then, I tried

use Carp;
...
croak "Invalid options";

which produces

Invalid options at myscript.pl line 47
    main::prepare_output_directory() called at myscript.pl line 546

So how can I just die with Invalid options and nothing else?

Bonus question: why does croak tell me that the error is at line 47, when the actual call to croak is on line 49?

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1  
re: bonus question, show more context for your croak? –  ysth Aug 29 '10 at 6:06
    
Never mind on the bonus question. I was just wondering if there might be some general reason. –  Ryan Thompson Aug 29 '10 at 8:14
    
For your bonus question: croak tries to report the line number from the perspective of the caller. Read the docs for the Carp module. –  Philip Potter Aug 29 '10 at 14:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Just put a newline at the end of the die string:

die "Invalid options\n";

That will prevent the location of the error from being appended to your message.

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20  
I guess they read the documentation. perldoc -f die –  Dave Cross Aug 29 '10 at 7:26
1  
I kind of wish there was a way to do the same with croak. My understanding is that semantically, die is for internal errors, while croak is for errors caused by something external. In this case, I want to indicate that the user entered invalid options, which is clearly a case of the latter. Yet I have to die instead of croak to suppress the backtrace. –  Ryan Thompson Sep 1 '10 at 7:55

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