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-->Question updated with more details<--

If I have some types e.g:

public class SomeType //Generated by some codegen i won't to change that.
{
    string C { get; set; }        
}

public class AnotherType : SomeType
{
    string A { get; set; }
    string B { get; set; }
}

Is it possible to assign property C automatically? For example when properties A and B get assigned or when I am Casting this type to some another type, or somehow else?

Basically for example I want to execute some logic to automatically assign property C according to values A and B at some point when properties values A and B get populated.

Is there any another ways of doing that rather than using standard properties?

I was thinking that it is possible to do some king of magic when i may cast type AnotherType to SomeType, but i cant implement implicit operator where i may put this conversion logic "from A+B to C" because compiler doesn't allow implicit operator for related types.

Now Only way i see it is remove inheritance and implement implicit operator for AnotherType to SomeType conversion, but the evil in that case i need to duplicate all properties of type SomeType within type AnotherType and i need to change type AnotherType manually every time when SomeType getting changed.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is possible using auto-implemented properties. You could use the setter of B to assign a value to C:

public class SomeType
{
    public string A { get; set; }
    public string C { get; set; }

    private string _b;
    public string B 
    { 
        get { return _b; } 
        set 
        { 
            // Set B to some new value
            _b = value; 

            // Assign C
            C = string.Format("B has been set to {0}", value);
        }
    }
}
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I have inheritance i cant modify properties –  Riapp Aug 29 '10 at 8:43
    
You are not modifying the names or the types of the properties, just the implementation of their getter and setter which should not break your inheritance. –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 29 '10 at 8:44
    
@bigb: I'm confused as to your comments. Are you saying that A & B, and possibly C, are auto properties inside of a class you are inheriting and can't modify? –  Paul Hadfield Aug 29 '10 at 8:50
    
that would only be true if the properties are virtual (which is, of course, not the default). –  Richard Aug 29 '10 at 9:01
    
question updated –  Riapp Aug 29 '10 at 11:27

Not that I know of, you'd have to use bog standard properties as follows (incase you only know about automatic properties)

public class SomeType
{
    string _A;
    string _B;
    string _C;

    public string A { get{return _A;}  set{ _A = value; _C = _A + _B; } }
    public string B { get{return _B;} set{ _B = value; _C = _A + _B; }
    public string C { get{return _C}; }
}
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i cant use standard properties –  Riapp Aug 29 '10 at 8:44
3  
@bigb, autoimplemented properties are standard properties. They are just syntactic sugar that gets compiled into standard properties, so yes you can use standard properties, you already do. –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 29 '10 at 8:47
    
Yes i know that, i did update the question with more details –  Riapp Aug 29 '10 at 11:38
    
With your updated question I feel it has been answered. C can stay an auto, A & B which appear to be in your control can be standard properties which update C. You can't do it with auto properties however –  Paul Hadfield Aug 29 '10 at 11:48

Do you want to be able to set C, or just get it? If you don't need to be able to set the value, then I think you want this:

public class MyClass
{
    private string _a = "not set";
    private string _b = "not set";

    public string A
    {
        get { return _a; }
        set { _a = value; }
    }

    public string B
    {
        get { return _b; }
        set { _b = value; }
    }

    public string C
    {
        get
        {
            if (_a != "not set" && _b != "not set")
                return "not set";
            else
                return "set";
        }
    }
}

Here's a simpler example of accessing a property that is dependent on another property:

public class MyClass
{
    private double[] MyArray = new double[5];

    public int NumElements
    {
        get
        {
            return MyArray.Length;
        }
    }
}
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