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I used this code to read file. But fread function always return 0. What is my mistake?

FILE *file = fopen(pathToSourceFile, "rb");
if(file!=NULL) 
{
    char aByte[50000];
    int ret = fread(aByte, sizeof(aByte), 1, file);
    if(ret != 0)
    {
        not jump into there;
        fseek(file, 0, SEEK_SET);
        fwrite(aByte, ret, 1, file);
    }
} 
fclose(file); 
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1  
Does the file definitely have at least 50000 bytes? –  Charles Bailey Aug 29 '10 at 11:10
    
@Charles, it shouldn't need to. fread should return the number of bytes actually read, which may be less than 50000. –  Matthew Flaschen Aug 29 '10 at 11:12
    
the file exist so fread must be return not 0 :(. –  user418304 Aug 29 '10 at 11:12
7  
@Matthew Flaschen: No. fread returns the number of objects read. If you are reading up to one 50000 byte objects it will return 0 or 1. –  Charles Bailey Aug 29 '10 at 11:14
2  
@msw Please don't try to justify making fun of the OP with wanting to help them or SO. This kind of behaviour is neither funny nor helping anybody. –  balpha Aug 29 '10 at 12:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

are you sure that your file has a size greater than 50000 ? else you could try:

 fread(aByte,1, sizeof(aByte),  file);
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YES because i readed data from a mp3 file that the size on disk is 3.2mb :S –  user418304 Aug 29 '10 at 11:34

ferror() will tell when something is wrong.

You can print the actual error message using perror().

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1  
ferror() won't tell you what is wrong, it'll tell you if something is wrong - it's just a true/false indication. Using perror() if ferror() returns true is good advice. –  caf Aug 30 '10 at 1:07
    
@caf: Thanks. Fixed. –  Johnsyweb Aug 30 '10 at 3:06

You can't fwrite to a file open in rb mode.

Your statement that ret is always zero is false. If you had properly instrumented your code, you'd not be making false claims:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {
    FILE *file = fopen("junk.dat", "rb");
    if(file!=NULL)
    {
        char aByte[50000];
        int ret = fread(aByte, sizeof(aByte), 1, file);
        fprintf(stderr, "fread returned %d\n", ret);

        if(ret != 0)
        {
            int fs = fseek(file, 0, SEEK_SET);
            if(fs == -1) {
                perror("fseek");
                exit(1);
            }
            fs = fwrite(aByte, ret, 1, file);
            if(fs != ret) {
                perror("fwrite");
                exit(1);
            }
        }
    }
    fclose(file);
    return 0;
}

Yields:

fread returned 1
fwrite: Bad file descriptor

when run.

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Yes sorry i change to rb to test fread. please skip to fwrite. :) –  user418304 Aug 29 '10 at 11:35
1  
It is best to cut and paste the code that you are actually having problems with end you can edit your question if your code changes. –  msw Aug 29 '10 at 11:50

Did you:

#include <unistd.h>

If not, and if you compile without -Wall, the C compiler can incorrectly assume that the second argument to fread() is an int rather than an off_t, which can mess up the function call. Your code snippet doesn't show any #include statements, so please make sure you're including everything that you're using.

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