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This has me pretty stumped. Maybe I'm too tired right now.

    Rectangle rectangle = new Rectangle(0, 0, image.Width, image.Height);
    Rectangle cropArea = inputArea == null ? rectangle : inputArea.Value;

    if (inputArea == null)
        cropArea = rectangle;

inputArea is a nullable Rectangle, which in my particular case is null.

The first two statements yields a cropArea initialized to 0. The second, however, yields the correct cropArea based on the image width and height. Have I misunderstood anything with the conditional operator? It seems it does not return rectangle when inputArea = null? Is there any quirks when working with value types?

EDIT: Alright, I should have tried this first: restarted VS. It seems the debugger lied to me, or something. Anyway, works now. Thanks.

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I thought about leaving it as a hint to anyone else that restarting VS can always solve unexpected problems. What do you think? –  Max Aug 29 '10 at 12:17
    
Who the hell downvoted this question??? It is a perfectly valid question exposing a horrible bug in Visual Studio. –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 29 '10 at 12:22
    
As an aside, note that you could use the null coalescing operator instead of the conditional operator here: croparea = inputArea ?? rectangle; –  Eric Lippert Aug 29 '10 at 15:04
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That seems like a nasty bug in Visual Studio debug mode which is fooling you:

alt text

Now F10 to step over this line and you get:

alt text

On the console correct values are printed.

WTF.

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Did you try Nullable<Rectangle> –  Michael D. Irizarry Aug 29 '10 at 12:20
    
@JeremySpouken, for which variable? –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 29 '10 at 12:21
1  
@JeremySpouken: That’s equivalent to Rectangle?. –  Timwi Aug 29 '10 at 12:33
    
Interesting. I typed the same code into VS and I get the correct values (in both DEBUG and RELEASE mode)... –  Timwi Aug 29 '10 at 12:38
    
@Timwi, what is the exact version number of VS you are using and the OS? For me it's 10.0.30319.1 RTMRel running on Windows 7 x64. –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 29 '10 at 12:40
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Rectangle cropArea = (!inputArea.HasValue) ? rectangle : inputArea.Value;
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1  
That’s equivalent. –  Timwi Aug 29 '10 at 12:05
    
Now why the spam on my thread fellas :) @Hitech Rectangle? inputArea = null; Nullable<Rectangle> inputArea2 = null; @TimWi - now why the downvote .. was just trying to help the OP out? –  StuartLC Aug 29 '10 at 12:47
    
+1 because I made a mistake on your post and started a small flame war. Turns out it is only the Silverlight Rectange class that is not nullable. –  TrueBlueAussie Aug 29 '10 at 14:35
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So are you saying that when inputArea is null, without the if statement you get a rectangle initialized to something else than the image size? I just tried running that and it works fine. Make sure that image has a size and that inputArea is actually null.

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Yes, all of which had seemed very weird, until I realized visual studio lied to me. See my edit. –  Max Aug 29 '10 at 12:12
    
@Max: Maybe it was a good thing I didn't use VS, then. –  Matti Virkkunen Aug 29 '10 at 12:16
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Your code appears correct. The conditional expression (or conditional operator, or originally called the ternary operator... everyone happy now? :)) should be interchangeable with if/else statements.

Rectangle cropArea = inputArea == null ? rectangle : inputArea.Value;

should be exactly the same as:

Rectangle cropArea;
if (inputArea == null)
{
    cropArea = rectangle;
}
else
{
    cropArea = inputArea.Value;
}

(in fact they should generate the same IL code).

Trace through with the debugger and see if anything jumps out at you.

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Please don’t call the conditional operator “the ternary operator”. I’ve edited your answer to correct this, I hope you don’t mind. –  Timwi Aug 29 '10 at 12:11
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What the hell?

Rectangle rectangle = ...;
Rectangle cropArea;
if (inputArea == null)
    cropArea = rectangle;
else
    cropArea = inputArea.Value;

if (inputArea == null)
    cropArea = rectangle;

Why have the second if? It's totally and entirely redundant. The scenario in which cropArea might still be null or zero is if inputArea.Value is null/zero, since you didn't check for that (only if inputArea is null).

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