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How to make text wrapping like this with semantic and clean HTML, CSS ? With compatible in all browser.

alt text

Adding different classes to <p> is the only solution I'm thinking if there is no other solution.

but with that way every time client would not be able to change classes, which is drawback.

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1  
Neat little tool you might like to see : csstextwrap.com –  Russell Dias Aug 29 '10 at 12:51
1  
It's doable, but it's not going to be clean nor semantic. –  Matti Virkkunen Aug 29 '10 at 12:52
    
@Matti Virkkunen - Agree with you –  Jitendra Vyas Aug 29 '10 at 12:53
    
@Russell Dias- I know about this. If there is no other semantic way then i will use this as a last resort. –  Jitendra Vyas Aug 29 '10 at 12:54

1 Answer 1

You could set the image as a background on your <p> and then float transparent containers overtop of the background image in the shape that you don't want text to overlap.

<p>
    <span id="block1"></span>  
    <span id="block2"></span>  
    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. ...
</p>

With the following CSS:

p {
   background: url(your-image.png) no-repeat 100% 0;
}

#block1 {
   float: right;
   width: 100px;
   height: 100px;
}

#block2 {
   clear: both;
   float: right;
   width: 200px;
   height: 50px;
}

The drawback though is that as with your paragraph class solution, this is a very manual fix. You can see it in action here.

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+1 you solution is good but to keep blank <span> in code is not semantically correct –  Jitendra Vyas Aug 29 '10 at 13:29
    
Well the problem here is that the "semantics" of an irregular image are just not expressible with HTML or CSS. What does the shape of an image mean? Well, maybe a lot of things, but in practical terms for page coding it's just a shape. HTML is not a page description language, as you know - it's intended to convey the meaning of content. There's just no provision for describing a single complex shape. –  Pointy Aug 29 '10 at 14:09

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