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I was told today that it's possible to invoke a function without parentheses. The only ways I could think of was using functions like apply or call.

f.apply(this);
f.call(this);

But these require parentheses on apply and call leaving us at square one. I also considered the idea of passing the function to some sort of event handler such as setTimeout:

setTimeout(f, 500);

But then the question becomes "how do you invoke setTimeout without parentheses?"

So what's the solution to this riddle? How can you invoke a function in Javascript without using parentheses?

share|improve this question
47  
Not trying to be rude, but I must ask: Why? – jehna1 Mar 11 at 20:45
28  
@jehna1 Because I was answering a question on how functions are invoked and was corrected when I said that they required parentheses on the end. – Mike C Mar 11 at 20:46
3  
Amazing! I didn't imagine this question would have that much traction.. Perhaps I should have asked it myself :-) – Amit Mar 12 at 6:17
4  
This is the kind of question that breaks my heart. What good could possibly come through such abuse and exploitation? I want to know one valid use case where <insert any solution> is objectively better or more useful than f(). – naomik Mar 13 at 19:37
3  
@naomik There's no valid reason. This whole thread is a "riddle" (and an unhelpful, misleading one IMO). – Aaron Mar 14 at 15:46
up vote 190 down vote accepted

The easiest way to do that is with the new operator:

function f() {
  alert('hello');
}

new f;

While that's unorthodox and unnatural, it works and is perfectly legal.

The new operator doesn't require parentheses if no parameters are used.

share|improve this answer
2  
Correction, the easiest way to do this is to prepend an operand that forces the function expression to be evaluated. !f results in the same thing, without instantiating an instance of the constructor function (which requires creating a new this context). It's much more performant and is used in many popular libraries (like Bootstrap). – THEtheChad Mar 13 at 5:11
3  
@THEtheChad - evaluating an expression is not the same as executing a function, but if you have a different (nicer? more surprising?) method of invoking (causing execution) of a function - post an answer! – Amit Mar 13 at 5:43

There are several different ways to call a function without parentheses.

Let's assume you have this function defined:

function greet() {
    console.log('hello');
}

Then here follow some ways to call greet without parentheses:

1. As Constructor

With new you can invoke a function without parentheses:

new greet; // parentheses are optional in this construct.

From MDN on the new oprator:

Syntax

new constructor[([arguments])]

2. As toString or valueOf Implementation

toString and valueOf are special methods: they get called implicitly when a conversion is necessary:

var obj = {
    toString: function() {
         return 'hello';
    }
}

'' + obj; // concatenation forces cast to string and call to toString.

You could (ab)use this pattern to call greet without parentheses:

'' + { toString: greet };

Or with valueOf:

+{ valueOf: greet };

2.b Overriding valueOf in Function Prototype

You could take the previous idea to override the valueOf method on the Function prototype:

Function.prototype.valueOf = function() {
    this.call(this);
    // Optional improvement: avoid `NaN` issues when used in expressions.
    return 0; 
};

Once you have done that, you can write:

+greet;

And although there are brackets involved down the line, the actual triggering invocation has no parentheses. See more about this in the blog "Calling methods in Javascript, without really calling them"

3. As Generator

You could define a generator function (with *), which returns an iterator. You can call it with the spread operator or for...of syntax.

First we need a generator variant of the original greet function:

function* greet_gen() {
    console.log('hello');
}

And then we call it without parentheses:

[...{ [Symbol.iterator]: greet_gen }];

Normally generators would have a yield keyword somewhere, but it is not needed for the function to get called.

The last statement invokes the function, but that could also be done with destructuring:

[,] = { [Symbol.iterator]: greet_gen };

or a for ... of construct:

for ({} of { [Symbol.iterator]: greet_gen });

Note that you can do the above with the original greet function as well, but it will trigger an exception in the process, after greet has been executed (tested on FF and Chrome). You could manage the exception with a try...catch block.

4. As Getter

@jehna1 has a full answer on this, so give him credit. Here is a way to call a function parentheses-less on the global scope, avoiding the deprecated __defineGetter__ method. It uses Object.defineProperty instead.

We need to create a variant of the original greet function for this:

Object.defineProperty(window, 'greet_get', { get: greet });

And then:

greet_get;

Replace window with whatever your global object is.

You could call the original greet function without leaving a trace on the global object like this:

Object.defineProperty({}, 'greet', { get: greet }).greet;

But one could argue we do have brackets here (although they are not involved in the actual invocation).

5. As Tag Function

With ES6 you can call a function passing it a template literal with this syntax:

greet``;

See "Tagged Template Literals". Normally you would not pass an empty literal like here, but as example of a parentheses-less call, it will do.

6. As Proxy Handler

In ES6, you can define a proxy:

var proxy = new Proxy({}, { get: greet } );

And then reading any property value will invoke greet:

proxy._; // even if property not defined, it still triggers greet

There are many variations of this. One more example:

var proxy = new Proxy({}, { has: greet } );

1 in proxy; // triggers greet
share|improve this answer
    
That's a very interesting approach using valueOf. – Mike C Mar 11 at 21:55
    
Interesting. You can also do: Function.prototype.toString=function(){ this.call(this); return "" };, after which you can also call the function with +func – jehna1 Mar 12 at 0:33
1  
You forgot about ES6: func``; – Ismael Miguel Mar 12 at 15:23
3  
You're not done ;-) – Amit Mar 12 at 16:05
1  
You used brackets by calling eval :) – trincot Mar 16 at 13:58

You can use getters and setters.

var h = {
  get ello () {
    alert("World");
  }
}

Run this script just with:

h.ello  // Fires up alert "world"

Edit:

We can even do arguments!

var h = {
  set ello (what) {
    alert("Hello " + what);
  }
}

h.ello = "world" // Fires up alert "Hello world"

Edit 2:

You can also define global functions that can be run without parenthesis:

window.__defineGetter__("hello", function() { alert("world"); });
hello;  // Fires up alert "world"

And with arguments:

window.__defineSetter__("hello", function(what) { alert("Hello " + what); });
hello = "world";  // Fires up alert "Hello world"

Disclaimer:

As @MonkeyZeus stated: Never ever shall you use this piece of code in production, no matter how good your intentions.

share|improve this answer
8  
Strictly speaking from the POV of "I'm an axe wielding mad-man that has the honor of taking over your code because you've moved on to bigger and better things; yet I know where you live". I really hope this isn't normal lol. Using it inside of a plug-in which you maintain, acceptable. Writing business-logic code, please hold while I sharpen my axe :) – MonkeyZeus Mar 11 at 22:15
3  
@MonkeyZeus haha, yes! Added a disclaimer for coders of the future that can find this from Google – jehna1 Mar 11 at 22:23
    
@jehna1 Much appreciated lol! – MonkeyZeus Mar 11 at 22:26
1  
Note that __defineGetter__ is deprecated. Use Object.defineProperty instead. – Felix Kling Mar 13 at 19:33
2  
@MonkeyZeus - as I explicitly wrote in the comment - this style of function invocation is being used, extensively & intentionally, in a very successful public library as the API itself, not internally. – Amit Mar 14 at 23:00

Here's an example for a particular situation:

window.onload = funcRef;

Although that statement is not actually invoking but will lead to a future invocation.

But, I figure grey-areas might be ok for riddles like this :)

share|improve this answer
5  
That's nice but that's not JavaScript, it's DOM. – Amit Mar 11 at 20:55
3  
@Amit, the DOM is part of the browser's JS environment, which is still JavaScript. – zzzzBov Mar 11 at 22:20
2  
@zzzzBov Not all ECMAScript runs in a web browser. Or are you among the people who use "JavaScript" to refer specifically to combining ES with the HTML DOM, as opposed to Node? – Damian Yerrick Mar 12 at 5:10
7  
@DamianYerrick, I consider the DOM to be a library available in some JS environments, which doesn't make it any less JavaScript than underscore being available in some environments. It's still JavaScript, it's just not a part that's specced in the ECMAScript specification. – zzzzBov Mar 12 at 22:05
2  
@zzzzBov, "Although the DOM is often accessed using JavaScript, it is not a part of the JavaScript language. It can also be accessed by other languages.". For example, FireFox uses XPIDL and XPCOM for DOM implementation. It is not so self-evident that the call of your specified callback function is implemented in JavaScript. The DOM is not an API like other JavaScript libraries. – trincot Mar 13 at 10:08

If we accept a lateral thinking approach, in a browser there are several API's we can abuse to execute arbitrary JavaScript, including calling a function, without any actual parenthesis characters.

1. location and javascript: protocol:

One such technique is to abuse the javascript: protocol on location assignment.

Working Example:

location='javascript:alert\x281\x29'

Although technically \x28 and \x29 are still parenthesis once the code is evaluated, the actual ( and ) character does not appear. The parentheses are escaped in a string of JavaScript which gets evaluated on assignment.


2. onerror and eval:

Similarly, depending on the browser we can abuse the global onerror, by setting it to eval, and throwing something that will stringify to valid JavaScript. This one is trickier, because browsers are inconsistent in this behavior, but here's an example for Chrome.

Working example for Chrome (not Firefox, others untested):

window.onerror=eval;Uncaught=0;throw';alert\x281\x29';

This works in Chrome because throw'test' will pass 'Uncaught test' as the first argument to onerror, which is almost valid JavaScript. If we instead do throw';test' it will pass 'Uncaught ;test'. Now we have valid JavaScript! Just define Uncaught, and replace test with the payload.


In conclusion:

Such code is truly awful, and should never be used, but is sometimes used in XSS attacks, so the moral of the story is don't rely on filtering parenthesis to prevent XSS. Using a CSP to prevent such code would also be a good idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't this the same as using eval and writing the string without actually using the parentheses characters. – Zev Spitz Mar 14 at 8:03
    
@ZenSpitz Yep, but eval normally requires parentheses, hence this filter evasion hack. – Alexander O'Mara Mar 14 at 8:05
4  
Arguably \x28 and \x29 are still parentheses. '\x28' === '('. – trincot Mar 14 at 10:01
    
@trincot Which is kind-of the point I covered in the answer, this is a lateral thinking approach which showcases a reason for which in which this might be done. I've made it more clear in the answer. – Alexander O'Mara Mar 14 at 17:27
    
Also, whoever voted to delete this, please review the guidelines for deleting answers. – Alexander O'Mara Mar 14 at 17:54

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