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In my project I have a method that creates a string from integers (using strcat) and writes it into a file. Unfortunately it does have a memory leak. While tracking that leak down I simplified my code to the following. I can't seem to locate or even fix it. This is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
int main(int argc, char* argv[] )
{
 char* output = "\0";
 int counter = 5;
  while(counter > 0)
  {
      char buffer[20];
      sprintf(buffer, "%u", counter);
      char* temp;
      temp = malloc((strlen(output) + strlen(buffer) + 1));
      strcpy(temp, buffer);
      strcat(temp, output);
      char* oldmemory = output;
      output = temp;
      free(oldmemory);
      counter--;
  }
printf("output: %s\n", output);
free(output);
return 0;
}

Valgrind returns:

==7125== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==7125== Copyright (C) 2002-2009, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==7125== Using Valgrind-3.6.0.SVN-Debian and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==7125== Command: ./foo
==7125== Parent PID: 4455
==7125== 
==7125== Invalid free() / delete / delete[]
==7125==    at 0x4024B3A: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:366)
==7125==    by 0x8048662: main (foo.c:20)
==7125==  Address 0x8048780 is not stack'd, malloc'd or (recently) free'd
==7125== 
==7125== 
==7125== HEAP SUMMARY:
==7125==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==7125==   total heap usage: 5 allocs, 6 frees, 20 bytes allocated
==7125== 
==7125== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==7125== 
==7125== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==7125== ERROR SUMMARY: 1 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 15 from 8)

Where is the memory leak and how can I fix it?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main(int argc, char* argv[] )
{
 char* output = "\0";

String literals are '\0' terminated automatically, you don't need to add it.

 int counter = 5;
  while(counter > 0)
  {
      char buffer[20];
      sprintf(buffer, "%u", counter);
      char* temp;
      temp = malloc((strlen(output) + strlen(buffer) + 1));
      strcpy(temp, buffer);
      strcat(temp, output);
      char* oldmemory = output;
      output = temp;
      free(oldmemory);

The first time this free() is called, it's freeing the initial value of output, which is a pointer to a string literal "\0". Calling free() on anything other than a valid pointer returned from *alloc() or NULL is undefined behaviour.

      counter--;
  }
printf("output: %s\n", output);
free(output);
return 0;
}

valgrind reports:

==7125== Invalid free() / delete / delete[]
==7125==    at 0x4024B3A: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:366)
==7125==    by 0x8048662: main (foo.c:20)
==7125==  Address 0x8048780 is not stack'd, malloc'd or (recently) free'd

This is not a memory leak; it's an invalid free().

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+1 for clear explanations. –  RBerteig Aug 29 '10 at 22:27

Your code is broken. The first pass through, you set oldmemory to output where output points to memory that wasn't allocated on the heap. Later, you attempt to free this memory. This generates the valgrind error about freeing memory that wasn't allocated via malloc. Hence, the original memory you allocated never does get freed.

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I think he / she knows it's broken. No need to be rude about it. –  SSH This Dec 6 '12 at 21:45
    
WTF? How is what I wrote being rude? I think you've got your sensitivity detector set just a bit too high. Or am I being rude for pointing that out. Maybe you already know that. –  sizzzzlerz Dec 6 '12 at 22:11
    
Lol no need to start randomly down voting my questions, bitch –  SSH This Dec 6 '12 at 22:36

Your app is crashing trying to free( "\0" ). (Just a note, if you want an empty string, "" is enough, "\0" is actually the string \0\0.

Instead of using malloc and strcpy, look at realloc, it does everything you want but better :) But you'd most likely want to build your string forward (counter = 0; counter < 5; count++) instead of going backwards

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3  
Except that failing realloc returns NULL, so you have to watch for leaks in the case where you do p = realloc(p, new_size). –  Roger Lipscombe Aug 29 '10 at 14:16
    
@Roger: failing realloc probably means that the program has to terminate gracefully. Don't think that a memory leak then is of much relevance. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 29 '10 at 14:48
    
Its not hard to catch the potential leak with realloc, just keep a copy of the original pointer across the call so that it can be freed. Or, assume that a failing realloc means that the end of the world, and just exit. I personally like to use assert() for that check, since it makes sure the exit is a notable failure. –  RBerteig Aug 29 '10 at 22:27
    
+1 for realloc(). –  RBerteig Aug 29 '10 at 22:28

If you want to use this algorithm, the the initial space for what output points to should be allocated with malloc, thusly:

 char *output = malloc(1);
 if(!output) { /* handle error */ }
 output[0] = '\0';
 ... rest of code as is ...

String literals are not allocated with malloc, and consequently can not be free'ed, which is the source of your problem.

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