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A quick brain teaser: given a string

This  is a string with  repeating   spaces

What would be the LINQ expressing to end up with

This is a string with repeating spaces

Thanks!

For reference, here's one non-LINQ way:

private static IEnumerable<char> RemoveRepeatingSpaces(IEnumerable<char> text)
{
  bool isSpace = false;
  foreach (var c in text)
  {
    if (isSpace && char.IsWhiteSpace(c)) continue;

    isSpace = char.IsWhiteSpace(c);
    yield return c;
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Someone asked why LINQ. I appreciate that LINQ may not be the best solution for this. Still, this is an operation on a set, and I am interested in seeing a set-based approach. Thanks! –  Michael Teper Aug 29 '10 at 16:48
    
Just because you can, doesn't mean you should! –  Rebecca Chernoff Aug 29 '10 at 17:28
    
Your non-LINQ solution skips everything after the first space. –  Dan Tao Aug 29 '10 at 17:48
    
@Dan Indeed! Fixed. –  Michael Teper Aug 30 '10 at 16:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since nobody seems to have given a satisfactory answer, I came up with one. Here's a string-based solution (.Net 4):

public static string RemoveRepeatedSpaces(this string s)
{
    return s[0] + string.Join("",
           s.Zip(
               s.Skip(1),
               (x, y) => x == y && y == ' ' ? (char?)null : y));
}

However, this is just a general case of removing repeated elements from a sequence, so here's the generalized version:

public static IEnumerable<T> RemoveRepeatedElements<T>(
                             this IEnumerable<T> s, T dup)
{
    return s.Take(1).Concat(
            s.Zip(
                s.Skip(1),
                (x, y) => x.Equals(y) && y.Equals(dup) ? (object)null : y)
            .OfType<T>());
}

Of course, that's really just a more specific version of a function that removes all consecutive duplicates from its input stream:

public static IEnumerable<T> RemoveRepeatedElements<T>(this IEnumerable<T> s)
{
    return s.Take(1).Concat(
            s.Zip(
                s.Skip(1),
                (x, y) => x.Equals(y) ? (object)null : y)
            .OfType<T>());
}

And obviously you can implement the first function in terms of the second:

public static string RemoveRepeatedSpaces(this string s)
{
    return string.Join("", s.RemoveRepeatedElements(' '));
}

BTW, I benchmarked my last function against the regex version (Regex.Replace(s, " +", " ")) and they were were within nanoseconds of each other, so the extra LINQ overhead is negligible compared to the extra regex overhead. When I generalized it to remove all consecutive duplicate characters, the equivalent regex (Regex.Replace(s, "(.)\\1+", "$1")) was 3.5 times slower than my LINQ version (string.Join("", s.RemoveRepeatedElements())).

I also tried the "ideal" procedural solution:

public static string RemoveRepeatedSpaces(string s)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(s.Length);
    char lastChar = '\0';
    foreach (char c in s)
        if (c != ' ' || lastChar != ' ')
            sb.Append(lastChar = c);
    return sb.ToString();
}

This is more than 5 times faster than a regex!

share|improve this answer
    
@Gabe: It seems to me that your LINQ wizardry has a weakness. This approach requires creating three separate enumerators for s. This assumes that these enumerators will all traverse s in the same order. An approach that uses a single enumerator assumes less about the data (though obviously I'm not saying it's perfect). –  Dan Tao Aug 31 '10 at 5:19
    
Dan: I would hope that s is always traversed in the same order -- otherwise the concept of "consecutive duplicates" is somewhat meaningless. Of course if that were an issue (say, s is a list of lazily-generated random numbers), that's what EnumerableEx.Memoize (community.bartdesmet.net/blogs/bart/archive/2010/01/07/…) is for. –  Gabe Aug 31 '10 at 5:29
    
@Gabe: Suppose you have a stream of random numbers and you want to skip consecutive occurrences of the same value while processing them. That seems like a plausible scenario to me. I suppose you could use Memoize in that case. Really, it's just that I'm skeptical of the idea of using three enumerators to do what you can accomplish with one. The cost of having them seems highly uncertain. –  Dan Tao Aug 31 '10 at 6:33
    
Dan: If you look at the edit at the end of my post, you can see that the cost of the "extra" enumerators is negligible (because they're lazy). If the enumerators each made a copy of the stream, that would be an unacceptable overhead, but since each enumerator is just an object with a pointer to the current position in the string, there's very little overhead. –  Gabe Aug 31 '10 at 7:24
    
@Gabe: But that completely depends on the IEnumerable<T> implementation! You probably tested it on a List<T> or a T[] or something to that effect. In that case sure the overhead would be negligible. I'm just saying, for a general solution such as this one, you can't assume that creating an enumerator is always going to be cheap. –  Dan Tao Aug 31 '10 at 7:29

This is not a linq type task, use regex

string output = Regex.Replace(input," +"," ");

Of course you could use linq to apply this to a collection of strings.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, nice answer. –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 29 '10 at 16:43
    
Don't you think Regex is way too heavy-handed for this? –  Michael Teper Aug 29 '10 at 16:51
3  
@Michael Teper: Personally, I think the other solutions that bend over backwards just to solve this problem using LINQ extension methods are the heavy-handed ones. You can solve the problem in one extremely short, readable line, or you can use a much less obvious method that requires 2 or more much longer lines. Which makes more sense? –  Dan Tao Aug 29 '10 at 16:58
    
@Michael Not at all, it's a perfect, if rather simple, regex problem. –  Paul Creasey Aug 29 '10 at 17:01
1  
Dan: I think this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the question. Think of the question as "How can I eliminate consecutive duplicates from a stream?". A Regex solution only works with this one concrete example of the general problem. –  Gabe Aug 29 '10 at 18:31
public static string TrimInternal(this string text)
{
  var trimmed = text.Where((c, index) => !char.IsWhiteSpace(c) || (index != 0 && !char.IsWhiteSpace(text[index - 1])));
  return new string(trimmed.ToArray());
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Cool, I didn't realize there was a Where overload that supplied an index. Good to know! –  Michael Teper Aug 29 '10 at 16:49
    
This implementation will strip all beginning whitespace but will leave a single trailing whitespace. Simplifying the condition in the Where: index == 0 || !char.IsWhiteSpace(text[index-1]) should preserve a single leading whitespace. +1 –  devgeezer Sep 21 '10 at 19:35

In practice, I would probably just use your original solution or regular expressions (if you want a quick & simple solution). A geeky approach that uses lambda functions would be to define a fixed point operator:

T FixPoint<T>(T initial, Func<T, T> f) {
   T current = initial;
   do { 
     initial = current;
     current = f(initial);
   } while (initial != current);
   return current;
}

This keeps calling the operation f repeatedly until the operation returns the same value that it got as an argument. You can think of the operation as a generalized loop - it is quite useful, though I guess it is too geeky to be included in .NET BCL. Then you can write:

string res = FixPoint(original, s => s.Replace("  ", " "));

It is not as efficient as your original version, but unless there are too many spaces it should work fine.

share|improve this answer
    
@Tomas: I really like the way how you apply strange complicated theory to programming problems and come up with elegant C# & F# solutions. Really liked your real-world functional programming book for just this reason. +1 for an interesting (if maybe somewhat over-the-top ;-) solution! –  stakx Aug 29 '10 at 17:39
    
@stakx: Thanks :-)! I agree that this is way over the top solution, but I just couldn't resist... –  Tomas Petricek Aug 29 '10 at 18:26

Linq is by definition related to enumerable (i.e. collections, list, arrays). You could transorm your string into a collection of char and select the non space one but this is definitevly not a job for Linq.

share|improve this answer
    
A string is a collection of chars –  Jamiec Aug 31 '10 at 8:26
    
@Jamiec: semantically it is, but is not implement as an IEnumerable<char> in the framework. Sorry for this lack of precision. –  VdesmedT Aug 31 '10 at 10:12

Paul Creasey's answer is the way to go.

If you want to treat tabs as whitespace as well, go with:

text = Regex.Replace(text, "[ |\t]+", " ");

UPDATE:

The most logical way to solve this problem while satisfying the "using LINQ" requirement has been suggested by both Hasan and Ani. However, notice that these solutions involve accessing a character in a string by index.

The spirit of the LINQ approach is that it can be applied to any enumerable sequence. Because any reasonably efficient solution to this problem requires maintaining some kind of state (with Ani's and Hasan's solutions it's easy to miss this fact as the state is already maintained within the string itself), a generic approach that accepts any sequence of items is likely going to be much more straightforward to implement using procedural code.

This procedural code may then be abstracted into a method that looks like a LINQ-style method, of course. But I would not recommend tackling a problem like this with the attitude of "I want to use LINQ in this solution" from the get-go because it will impose very awkward restriction on your code.

For what it's worth, here's how I'd implement the general idea.

public static IEnumerable<T> StripConsecutives<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, T value, IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
{
    // null-checking omitted for brevity

    using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return enumerator.Current;
        }
        else
        {
            yield break;
        }

        T prev = enumerator.Current;
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            T current = enumerator.Current;
            if (comparer.Equals(prev, value) && comparer.Equals(current, value))
            {
                // This is a consecutive occurrence of value --
                // moving on...
            }
            else
            {
                yield return current;
            }
            prev = current;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You don't actually have to maintain state. You can do it functionally by letting the iterator maintain the state for you with the Zip function (see stackoverflow.com/questions/3595583/…). Obviously if I were implementing this in Linq-to-Objects, your implementation is the way to go. If you needed it to run on a SQL Server, for example, your method wouldn't work. –  Gabe Aug 31 '10 at 3:56
    
@Gabe: My point was that this solution requires for someone (or something) to maintain state; notice I pointed to Ani's answer as an example where this is easy to miss because the state is maintained within the string itself. To simply observe that you can code a similar solution using Zip does not invalidate that point; it merely moves the maintenance of state somewhere else. Again, I wanted to stress to the OP that the requirement "I want to do this with LINQ" creates a conflict between the specified requirements and what a more logical approach would be. –  Dan Tao Aug 31 '10 at 5:22
    
Dan: The OP explicitly stated that this is a "brain teaser", clearly indicating that he didn't want a "more logical" approach. Then he said "this is an operation on a set, and I am interested in seeing a set-based approach" (meaning 'stream' where he said 'set'), emphasizing that he wanted a more general approach. –  Gabe Aug 31 '10 at 6:05
    
@Gabe: OK, fair point about the comment (I'm having trouble keeping track of in what order the OP said what). But how do you get from the term "brain teaser" to the conclusion that the OP "clearly" was not interested in a "logical" approach? Are logical answers to brain teasers unacceptable? I kind of thought they were the best ones... –  Dan Tao Aug 31 '10 at 6:37
    
Dan: When somebody says "Given constraint X, solve problem Y", you can assume that they expect a logical answer to Y such that X holds. I think it's safe to say that usually an answer like "Just eliminate constraint X" is not what they're looking for, or they wouldn't have mentioned X in the first place. Do you go to code-golf questions and criticize the answers for being too hard to understand and unmaintainable? –  Gabe Aug 31 '10 at 7:09

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