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Which access modifier, in an abstract class, do I have to use for a method, so the subclasses can decide whether it should be public or not? Is it possible to "override" a modifier in Java or not?

public abstract class A {

    ??? void method();
}

public class B extends A {
    @Override
    public void method(){
        // TODO
    }
}

public class C extends B {
    @Override
    private void method(){
        // TODO
    }
}

I know that there will be a problem with static binding, if someone calls:

// Will work
A foo = new B()
foo.method();

// Compiler ?
A foo = new C();
foo.method();

But maybe there is another way. How I can achieve that?

share|improve this question
    
You can make the overridden final but not private. Also you can make it deprecated and throw unsupported operation exception (guava does that for immutable collections) – Paweł Prażak Mar 13 at 11:29
up vote 12 down vote accepted

It is possible to relax the restriction, but not to make it more restrictive:

public abstract class A {
    protected void method();
}

public class B extends A {
    @Override
    public void method(){    // OK
    }
}

public class C extends A {
    @Override
    private void method(){    // not allowed
    }
}

Making the original method private won't work either, since such method isn't visible in subclasses and therefore cannot be overriden.

I would recommend using interfaces to selectively expose or hide the method:

public interface WithMethod {
    // other methods
    void method();
}

public interface WithoutMethod {
    // other methods
    // no 'method()'
}

public abstract class A {
    protected void method();
}

public class B extends A implements WithMethod {
    @Override
    public void method(){
      //TODO
    }
}

public class C extends B implements WithoutMethod {
    // no 'method()'
}

... then only work with the instances through the interfaces.

share|improve this answer
    
shouldn't I then only use the interfaces and drop the abstract class ? – jam Mar 12 at 10:35
    
You can, if you don't need it for code reuse. – Jiri Tousek Mar 12 at 11:05
1  
In your example code, wouldn't an instance of class C still have a method() from class B? Since C extends B. The adding of implements WithoutMethod for class C is unable to remove method() from class C. Right? So "only work[ing] with the instances through the interfaces." just let's you pretend that C has no method()? – Tersosauros Mar 12 at 12:47
2  
Hmm... An interesting idea, but... This way you can just make WithMethod extend WithoutMethod. Then class C will implement WithoutMethod implicitly. As will class B, though, which may or may not be what the OP wants in the first place. – Sergey Tachenov Mar 12 at 13:22
1  
@Tersosauros: If you're extending an existing class, you must provide all its methods, or you'd violate LSP. – Kevin Mar 12 at 16:55

When overriding methods, you can only change the modifier to a wider one, not vice versa. For example this code would be valid:

public abstract class A {

    protected void method();
}

public class B extends A {
    @Override
    public void method() { }
}

However, if you try to narrow down the visibility, you'd get a compile-time error:

public abstract class A {
    protected void method();
}

public class B extends A {
    @Override
    private void method() {}
}

For your case, I'd suggest to make C not implementing A, as A's abstraction implies that there's a non-private method():

public class C {
    private void method(){
      //TODO
    }
}

Another option is to make the method() implementation in C throwing a RuntimeException:

public class C extends A {

    @Override
    public void method(){
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("C doesn't support callbacks to method()");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
if I would make method in A protected and in C protected as well it would work and access from outside the package or subclass would'nt be possible ? – jam Mar 12 at 10:11
    
Yes, but he wants it private. – Konstantin Yovkov Mar 12 at 10:15

What you are asking for is not possible for very good reasons.

The Liskov substitution principle basically says: a class S is a subclass of another class T only then, when you can replace any occurrence of some "T object" with some "S object" - without noticing.

If you would allow that S is reducing a public method to private, then you can't do that any more. Because all of a sudden, that method that could be called while using some T ... isn't available any more to be called on S.

Long story short: inheritance is not something that simply falls out of the sky. It is a property of classes that you as the programmer are responsible for. In other words: inheritance means more than just writing down "class S extends T" in your source code!

share|improve this answer
    
The LSP requires that base-class methods exist and have a defined function in all derived classes. It does not require that the function actually be useful in all derived classes. For example, it would be legitimate for the contract of a derived class to specify that some virtual base-class property will always return "false" for all instances of that derived class. In such cases, it may be entirely reasonable to hide that member in the derived class, since there would be no reason to invoke it on a reference known to identify a derived-class object. – supercat Mar 12 at 19:10
    
You said it yourself: the method must exist in the derived class. Turning it private is the very same thing as removing completely from an outside perspective. And of course, you can do with an "S" whatever S allows for; but that is the whole point of "transparent exchange"; you are accessing the S as T. Thus I am not sure what you are trying to say. – Jägermeister Mar 12 at 19:23
    
If recipients of a reference to instance of some class may want to use its "Wizzle()" method if it has one, or else perform some other sequence of methods which can achieve the same effect but less efficiently, and some derivatives will be able to "Wizzle()" and others won't, it may be helpful to have the base class include a "CanWizzle()" property and a "Wizzle()" method, with the contract that if "CanWizzle()" returns true the "Wizzle() " method will return something useful, and if "CanWizzle()" returns false it might not. A derived class which can't "Wizzle()"... – supercat Mar 12 at 19:28
    
...would have no reason to allow the "Wizzle()" method to be invoked upon references that are known to identify instances of that derived class (since such a call couldn't possibly work). – supercat Mar 12 at 19:32
    
Maybe so. But such discussions do not make such in such general terms. As I would then ask: and if some of your thingies can whistle; and others can not; what is the purpose then of having a common base class? – Jägermeister Mar 12 at 19:33

This is impossible because of the polymorphism. Consider the following. You have the method in class A with some access modifier which is not private. Why not private? Because if it was private, then no other class could even know of its existence. So it has to be something else, and that something else must be accessible from somewhere.

Now let's suppose that you pass an instance of class C to somewhere. But you upcast it to A beforehand, and so you end up having this code somewhere:

void somewhereMethod(A instance) {
    instance.method(); // Ouch! Calling a private method on class C.
}

One nice example how this got broken is QSaveFile in Qt. Unlike Java, C++ actually allows to lower access privileges. So they did just that, forbidding the close() method. What they ended up with is a QIODevice subclass that is not really a QIODevice any more. If you pass a pointer to QSaveFile to some method accepting QIODevice*, they can still call close() because it's public in QIODevice. They “fixed” this by making QSaveFile::close() (which is private) call abort(), so if you do something like that, your program immediately crashes. Not a very nice “solution”, but there is no better one. And it's just an example of bad OO design. That's why Java doesn't allow it.

Edit

Not that I missed that your class is abstract, but I also missed the fact that B extends C, not A. This way what you want to do is completely impossible. If the method is public in B, it will be public in all subclasses too. The only thing you can do is document that it shouldn't be called and maybe override it to throw UnsupportedOperationException. But that would lead to the same problems as with QSaveFile. Remember that users of your class may not even know that it's an instance of C so they won't even have a chance to read its documentation.

Overall it's just a very bad idea OO-wise. Perhaps you should ask another question about the exact problem you're trying to solve with this hierarchy, and maybe you'll get some decent advises on how to do it properly.

share|improve this answer

Here is a part of the @Override contract.

The answer is : there isn't any possibility to achieve what you have.

The access level cannot be more restrictive than the overridden method's access level. For example: if the superclass method is declared public then the overridding method in the sub class cannot be either private or protected.

This is not a problem concerning abstract classes only but all classes and methods.

share|improve this answer

THEORY:

You have the determined modifiers order:

public <- protected <- default-access X<- private

When you override the method, you can increase, but not decrease the modifier level. For example,

public -> []
protected -> [public]
default-access -> [public, default-access]
private -> []

PRACTICE:

In your case, you cannot turn ??? into some modifier, because private is the lowest modifier and private class members are not inherited.

share|improve this answer
4  
This is incorrect, although it's a widespread myth. In fact, the correct order is public -> protected -> default-access -> private. You can actually access protected members from other classes in the same package and from subclasses in other packages, while default-access only provides the former. Refer to JLS 8.4.8.3. – Sergey Tachenov Mar 12 at 10:49
    
@SergeyTachenov, you're right, I corrected – Andrew Tobilko Mar 12 at 10:56

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