Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two processes which are communicating over a pair of sockets created with socketpair() and SOCK_SEQPACKET. Like this:

int ipc_sockets[2];
socketpair(PF_LOCAL, SOCK_SEQPACKET, 0, ipc_sockets);

As I understand it, I should see MSG_EOR in the msg_flags member of "struct msghdr" when receiving a SOCK_SEQPACKET record. I am setting MSG_EOR in sendmsg() to be certain that the record is marked MSG_EOR, but I do not see it when receiving in recvmsg(). I've even tried to set MSG_EOR in the msg_flags field before sending the record, but that made no difference at all.

I think I should see MSG_EOR unless the record was cut short by, e.g. a signal, but I do not. Why is that?

I've pasted my sending and receiving code in below.

Thanks, jules

int
send_fd(int fd,
        void *data,
        const uint32_t len,
        int fd_to_send,
        uint32_t * const bytes_sent)
{
    ssize_t n;
    struct msghdr msg;
    struct iovec iov;

    memset(&msg, 0, sizeof(struct msghdr));
    memset(&iov, 0, sizeof(struct iovec));

#ifdef HAVE_MSGHDR_MSG_CONTROL
    union {
        struct cmsghdr cm;
        char control[CMSG_SPACE_SIZEOF_INT];
    } control_un;
    struct cmsghdr *cmptr;

    msg.msg_control = control_un.control;
    msg.msg_controllen = sizeof(control_un.control);
    memset(msg.msg_control, 0, sizeof(control_un.control));

    cmptr = CMSG_FIRSTHDR(&msg);
    cmptr->cmsg_len = CMSG_LEN(sizeof(int));
    cmptr->cmsg_level = SOL_SOCKET;
    cmptr->cmsg_type = SCM_RIGHTS;
    *((int *) CMSG_DATA(cmptr)) = fd_to_send;
#else
    msg.msg_accrights = (caddr_t) &fd_to_send;
    msg.msg_accrightslen = sizeof(int);
#endif
    msg.msg_name = NULL;
    msg.msg_namelen = 0;

    iov.iov_base = data;
    iov.iov_len = len;
    msg.msg_iov = &iov;
    msg.msg_iovlen = 1;

#ifdef __linux__
    msg.msg_flags = MSG_EOR;
    n = sendmsg(fd, &msg, MSG_EOR);
#elif defined __APPLE__
    n = sendmsg(fd, &msg, 0); /* MSG_EOR is not supported on Mac                                                                                                                                                                        
                               * OS X due to lack of                                                                                                                                                                                    
                               * SOCK_SEQPACKET support on                                                                                                                                                                              
                               * socketpair() */
#endif
    switch (n) {
    case EMSGSIZE:
        return EMSGSIZE;
    case -1:
        return 1;
    default:
        *bytes_sent = n;
    }

    return 0;
}

int
recv_fd(int fd,
        void *buf,
        const uint32_t len,
        int *recvfd,
        uint32_t * const bytes_recv)
{
    struct msghdr msg;
    struct iovec iov;
    ssize_t n = 0;
#ifndef HAVE_MSGHDR_MSG_CONTROL
    int newfd;
#endif
    memset(&msg, 0, sizeof(struct msghdr));
    memset(&iov, 0, sizeof(struct iovec));

#ifdef HAVE_MSGHDR_MSG_CONTROL
    union {
        struct cmsghdr  cm;
        char control[CMSG_SPACE_SIZEOF_INT];
    } control_un;
    struct cmsghdr *cmptr;

    msg.msg_control = control_un.control;
    msg.msg_controllen = sizeof(control_un.control);
    memset(msg.msg_control, 0, sizeof(control_un.control));
#else
    msg.msg_accrights = (caddr_t) &newfd;
    msg.msg_accrightslen = sizeof(int);
#endif
    msg.msg_name = NULL;
    msg.msg_namelen = 0;

    iov.iov_base = buf;
    iov.iov_len = len;
    msg.msg_iov = &iov;
    msg.msg_iovlen = 1;

    if (recvfd)
        *recvfd = -1;

    n = recvmsg(fd, &msg, 0);
    if (msg.msg_flags) { // <== I should see MSG_EOR here if the entire record was received
        return 1;
    }
    if (bytes_recv)
        *bytes_recv = n;
    switch (n) {
    case 0:
        *bytes_recv = 0;
        return 0;
    case -1:
        return 1;
    default:
        break;
    }

#ifdef HAVE_MSGHDR_MSG_CONTROL
    if ((NULL != (cmptr = CMSG_FIRSTHDR(&msg))) 
        && cmptr->cmsg_len == CMSG_LEN(sizeof(int))) {
        if (SOL_SOCKET != cmptr->cmsg_level) {
            return 0;
        }
        if (SCM_RIGHTS != cmptr->cmsg_type) {
            return 0;
        }
        if (recvfd)
            *recvfd = *((int *) CMSG_DATA(cmptr));
    }
#else
    if (recvfd && (sizeof(int) == msg.msg_accrightslen))
        *recvfd = newfd;
#endif
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Not read it all as too much, as can be seen by me getting confused as to which method I was reading, send and receive are share a lot of code that could be factored out. Are you are trying to send out of band data. IP sockets and pipes can not send out of band data (except EOF when connection is closed), I assume that unix sockets are the same. –  richard Feb 2 '11 at 15:51
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With SOCK_SEQPACKET unix domain sockets the only way for the message to be cut short is if the buffer you give to recvmsg() isn't big enough (and in that case you'll get MSG_TRUNC).

POSIX says that SOCK_SEQPACKET sockets must set MSG_EOR at the end of a record, but Linux unix domain sockets don't.

(Refs: POSIX 2008 2.10.10 says SOCK_SEQPACKET must support records, and 2.10.6 says record boundaries are visible to the receiver via the MSG_EOR flag.)

What a 'record' means for a given protocol is up to the implementation to define.

If Linux did implement MSG_EOR for unix domain sockets, I think the only sensible way would be to say that each packet was a record in itself, and so always set MSG_EOR (or maybe always set it when not setting MSG_TRUNC), so it wouldn't be informative anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
You are absolutely correct, and actually (as I said in another comment) only one NIC driver sets this flag, or did so when I looked. Apparently this happens way down in the driver and not in the protocol layer... –  colding May 23 '11 at 9:40
add comment

That's not what MSG_EOR is for.

Remember that the sockets API is an abstraction over a number of different protocols, including UNIX filesystem sockets, socketpairs, TCP, UDP, and many many different network protocols, including X.25 and some entirely forgotten ones.

MSG_EOR is to signal end of record where that makes sense for the underlying protocol. I.e. it is to pass a message to the next layer down that "this completes a record". This may affect for example, buffering, causing the flushing of a buffer. But if the protocol itself doesn't have a concept of a "record" there is no reason to expect the flag to be propagated.

Secondly, if using SEQPACKET you must read the entire message at once. If you do not the remainder will be discarded. That's documented. In particular, MSG_EOR is not a flag to tell you that this is the last part of the packet.

Advice: You are obviously writing a non-SEQPACKET version for use on MacOS. I suggest you dump the SEQPACKET version as it is only going to double the maintenance and coding burden. SOCK_STREAM is fine for all platforms.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not talking about EOR, but MSG_EOR. See the man page for sendmsg(2). I've taken a small look at the source and only one driver was setting the MSG_EOR flag at all (can't remember which...). –  colding Apr 17 '11 at 15:04
    
Edited to correct from EOR to MSG_EOR - I was just abbreviating, but evidently that was confusing, sorry. –  Ben Apr 20 '11 at 21:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.