Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This question already has an answer here:

My python script needs to start a background process and then continue processing to completion without waiting for a return.

The background script will process for some time and will not generate any screen output.

There is no inter-process data required.

I have tried using various methods subprocess, multiprocessing but am clearly missing something.

Does anyone have a simple example?

TIA

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by olibre, FallenAngel, joaquin, singles, David Nov 13 '13 at 21:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 3 down vote accepted

how about this:

import subprocess
from multiprocessing import Process

Process(target=subprocess.call, args=(('ls', '-l', ), )).start()

It's not all that elegant, but it fulfils all your requirements.

share|improve this answer

Simple:

subprocess.Popen(["background-process", "arguments"])

If you want to check later whether the background process completed its job, retain a reference to the Popen object and use it's poll() method.

share|improve this answer

There is a nice writeup of the various pieces/parts on how to do it at http://stackoverflow.com/questions/89228/how-to-call-external-command-in-python/92395 (per @lecodesportif).

The gist of a quick answer is:

retcode = subprocess.call(["ls", "-l"])
share|improve this answer
    
It fails the "without waiting" requirement. – Marius Gedminas Aug 29 '10 at 17:39
1  
Ah - my bad, I missed that in the reading. You're quite correct. Stefano's answer should do what you want then. – heckj Aug 29 '10 at 18:07
    
What about something like: retcode = subprocess.call(["ls -l &"], shell=True). That works for me. – SunSparc May 21 '13 at 21:33

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.