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I've the following program:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {

    int v[100];
    int *p;

    for (p = &(v[0]); p != &(v[100]); ++p)
        if ((*p = getchar()) == EOF) {
            --p;
            break;
        }

    while (p != v)
        putchar(*--p);

    return 0;
}

And this is the output of gcc --version on the terminal:

Configured with: --prefix=/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/usr --with-gxx-include-dir=/usr/include/c++/4.2.1
Apple LLVM version 7.0.2 (clang-700.1.81)
Target: x86_64-apple-darwin15.3.0
Thread model: posix

Why getting the address of the element after the last of an array gives me no warning but getting for example the address of v[101] gives me the following warning

test.c:8:29: warning: array index 101 is past the end of the array (which
      contains 100 elements) [-Warray-bounds]
    for(p = &(v[0]); p != &(v[101]); ++p)
                            ^ ~~~
test.c:5:5: note: array 'v' declared here
    int v[100];
    ^
1 warning generated.

I know that indexing elements out of the bounds of a buffer is undefined behaviour, so why isn't the compiler complaining about the first case?

share|improve this question
1  
Your program will invoke undefined behavior if only zero characters are read before EOF. – MikeCAT Mar 12 at 14:28
2  
You should not decrement p upon EOF. – chqrlie Mar 12 at 14:36
    
@chqrlie You say this because in the following while loop I first decrement p and then dereference it? – nbro Mar 12 at 14:41
1  
@nbro: exactly. p points one past past the last valid character read with the first loop, either because you read 100 characters or because you hit the end of file. Hence do not increment p when you break from the first loop. Btw this will fix the problem MikeCAT was hinting at in his comment. – chqrlie Mar 12 at 14:46

Moving pointer to one past the last element of array is allowed unless you dereference the pointer, so your program is valid if one or more characters are read before hitting EOF.

N1256 6.5.2.1 Array subscripting

The definition of the subscript operator [] is that E1[E2] is identical to (*((E1)+(E2))).

N1256 6.5.3.2 Address and indirection operators

If the operand is the result of a unary * operator, neither that operator nor the & operator is evaluated and the result is as if both were omitted, except that the constraints on the operators still apply and the result is not an lvalue. Similarly, if the operand is the result of a [] operator, neither the & operator nor the unary * that is implied by the [] is evaluated and the result is as if the & operator were removed and the [] operator were changed to a + operator.

N1256 6.5.6 Additive operators

Moreover, if the expression P points to the last element of an array object, the expression (P)+1 points one past the last element of the array object, and if the expression Q points one past the last element of an array object, the expression (Q)-1 points to the last element of the array object

share|improve this answer
2  
Honestly, the citations do not answer my question. You're also saying that moving a pointer to one past the last element of an array is allowed (and the citations are not actually related to what you're saying), but I'm also actually getting the address of the element past the last element (by first accessing it)... – nbro Mar 12 at 19:01
    
@nbro There's also a quote that &*X is defined to be the same as X , so when you combine this with the first quote in this answer, you see that &v[100] is defined to mean (v + 100) which is legal as per the last quote – M.M Mar 12 at 21:48
    
To put it another way, talking about *(v+100) is only undefined if you try to access the designated memory location (which you would do by any context other than putting & or sizeof before it) – M.M Mar 12 at 21:50
    
@M.M "There's also a quote that &*X is defined to be the same as X ", where? – nbro Mar 12 at 23:10
    
@nbro C11 6.5.3.2/3, "[...] if the operand is the result of a [] operator, neither the & operator nor the unary * that is implied by the [] is evaluated and the result is as if the & operator were removed and the [] operator were changed to a + operator" – M.M Mar 12 at 23:53

It's about compatibility with sloppily written code.

As MikeCAT cited, for an array int ar[N], the expression ar+N is valid and results in a pointer that points to the past-the-end position. While this pointer cannot be dereferenced, it can be compared to any other pointer into the array, which allows you to write the nice for (p = ar; p != ar+N; ++p) loop.

Also, programmers like to write readable code, and arguably, if you want a pointer to the ith element of an array, writing &ar[i] conveys your intention more clearly than writing ar + i.

Combine these two, and you will get programmers who write &ar[N] to get the past-the-end pointer, and while this is technically accessing an invalid array index, no compiler will ever implement this as anything else than ar + N - in fact, the compiler would have to go out of its way to do it differently. Quite far in fact.

So, since any compiler that doesn't reason very strictly about undefined behavior will do the thing programmers expect for the expression, there's no reason not to write it, and so lots of people wrote it. And now we have massive code bases that use this idiom, which means that even modern compilers with their value tracking and reasoning about undefined behavior have to support this idiom for compatibility. And since Clang's warnings are meant to be useful, this particular warning was written so as to not warn about a case that will work anyway, out of some sense of misplaced pedantry.

share|improve this answer
    
It's about compatibility with sloppily written code. I disagree. There's nothing sloppy about constructing a pointer one past the end of an array. The behavior is well defined, and it's a useful technique. – Keith Thompson Mar 13 at 1:50

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