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For example, if the input is 825 the output expected is (0 1 2 0 1). What this means is: 0 two's, 1 three's, 2 five's, 0 seven's and 1 eleven.

Doing this imperatively was quite easy for me. Functional, not so much. Could you please guide me how to go about solving the above problem in a functional way?

Note: Fold/reduce ways will be preferred over explicit recursion. :)

EDIT:

I'd appreciate the direct Haskell/Clojure code instead of a vague description.

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Edited title and then reverted. "factorise" was not in my dictionary, but "factorize" is, so I guess it may be British English. Sorry about that. –  Pascal Cuoq Aug 29 '10 at 19:58
10  
Rather than asking "Please can you write my code for me?" - let us know what you've tried already. Do you need to know what approach to take, or how to turn that approach into code? –  Gareth Aug 29 '10 at 20:08
    
@Gareth: I have a rough idea on what approach to take. I am not able to turn it into code though. –  one-zero-zero-one Aug 29 '10 at 20:11
2  
@Gareth: I have already solved this problem in an imperative fashion; it was trivial. I was just wondering how to do it functionally. Since I am a FP novice, I though it'd help me learn FP better. –  one-zero-zero-one Aug 29 '10 at 20:12

16 Answers 16

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is my own Haskell trial. I'm still a Haskell newbie myself (but not really a newbie as a functional programmer), hence there is probably many possible improvements. I could probably find some myself thinking harder, but it works as expected and I see no obvious algorithmic slowness.

The code includes a primes number generator as one was necessary for a complete answer. OP could have provided his one primes generator as he said he know how to do it, it would have avoided including it in answers.

I don't see much difference between what I wrote functionaly using Haskell and what I could have wrote iteratively. The main difficulty was probably the strange expected format of the result.

module Primes
where

isPrime :: Integer -> Bool
isPrime a = isPrimeHelper a primes

isPrimeHelper a (p:ps)
 | p*p > a = True
 | a `mod` p == 0 = False
 | otherwise = isPrimeHelper a ps

-- List of prime numbers
primes :: [Integer]
primes = 2 : filter isPrime [3..]

countFactor x p
 | x `mod` p == 0 = 1 + countFactor (x `div` p) p
 | otherwise = 0

cleanFactor x p
 | x `mod` p == 0 = cleanFactor (x `div` p) p
 | otherwise = x

nbFactors x (p:ps)
 | x == 1 = []
 | x `mod` p == 0 = (countFactor x p) : (nbFactors (cleanFactor x p) ps)
 | otherwise = 0 : (nbFactors x ps)

-- List of number of times each prime number divides x
-- (tricky because the result is supposed to put 0 for non dividers primes,
-- but only for those smaller than larger prime divider...)
factor :: Integer -> [Integer]
factor x = nbFactors x primes

Unit tests are included below. As I use TDD I had to write them anyway.

module Main
where

import Test.HUnit
import Primes

test1 = True  ~=? (isPrime 2)
test2 = True  ~=? (isPrime 3)
test3 = False ~=? (isPrime 4)
test4 = True  ~=? (isPrime 5)

test5 = 2 ~=? (primes !! 0)
test6 = 7 ~=? (primes !! 3)

test7 = 2 ~=? (countFactor 825 5)
test8 = 0 ~=? (countFactor 825 17)
test9 = 33 ~=? (cleanFactor 825 5)

test10 = [0, 1, 2, 0, 1] ~=? (factor 825)

tests = TestList [ test1, test2, test3, test4,
                   test5, test6,
                   test7, test8, test9,
                   test10
                 ]

main = do runTestTT tests

Below is a better version suggested by yatima2975 that needs less calls to mod and div (that can be quite costly whith large numbers).

module Primes
where

isPrime :: Integer -> Bool
isPrime = isPrimeHelper primes

isPrimeHelper (p:ps) a
 | p*p > a = True
 | a `mod` p == 0 = False
 | otherwise = isPrimeHelper ps a

-- List of prime numbers
primes :: [Integer]
primes = 2 : filter isPrime [3..]

countClean = countCleanHelper 0
countCleanHelper e x p = case divMod x p of
    (x',0) -> countCleanHelper (e+1) x' p
    _ -> (e,x)

nbFactors _ 1 = []
nbFactors (p:ps) x = let (exponent, rest) = countClean x p 
    in exponent : nbFactors ps rest


-- List of number of times each prime number divides x
-- (tricky because the result is supposed to put 0 for non dividers primes,
-- but only for those smaller than larger prime divider...)
factor :: Integer -> [Integer]
factor = nbFactors primes

And the updated tests

module Main
where

import Test.HUnit
import Primes

test1 = True  ~=? (isPrime 2)
test2 = True  ~=? (isPrime 3)
test3 = False ~=? (isPrime 4)
test4 = True  ~=? (isPrime 5)

test5 = 2 ~=? (primes !! 0)
test6 = 7 ~=? (primes !! 3)

test7 = (2,33) ~=? (countClean 825 5)
test8 = (0,825) ~=? (countClean 825 17)

test10 = [0, 1, 2, 0, 1] ~=? (factor 825)

tests = TestList [ test1, test2, test3, test4,
                   test5, test6,
                   test7, test8,
                   test10
                 ]

main = do runTestTT tests
share|improve this answer
    
That's a fine solution for a newbie! The only thing I can come up with to improve it further is cutting down on the number of times x mod p is computed since that can get pretty expensive for larger numbers. Here's what I came up with (code in comments is ugly and short variable names due to comment size restriction, sorry!): nbFactors 1 _ = [] / nbFactors x (p:ps) = exponent : nbFactors rest ps where / ` (exponent,rest) = countClean 0 x` / ` countClean e y = case divMod y p of` / ` (y',0) -> countClean (e+1) y` / ` _ -> (e,y)` –  yatima2975 Aug 30 '10 at 9:03
    
Okay, here a pastebin for easier reading: pastebin.com/a6btEb2q –  yatima2975 Aug 30 '10 at 9:12
    
@yatima2975: Thanks for the enhancement. The only thing I do not really like is passing current prime divider p to countClean through the closure. It's a bit too hidden for my taste, so I slightly changed your proposal using explicit intermediate helper functions. –  kriss Aug 30 '10 at 13:20
    
@yatima2975: also removed some syntaxic noise using partial functions, that the kind of tricks I love with Haskell :-) –  kriss Aug 31 '10 at 0:36
    
Why the downvote ? Just wondering. –  kriss Aug 31 '10 at 13:56

I assume from your question you can produce a lazy list of primes. This is a direct clojure code, with recursion, though. It could also be made more efficient.

(defn div-times
  "How many times can n divideded by d"
  [n d]
    (loop [n n
           d d
           times 0]
      (if (= 0 (mod n d))
        (recur (/ n d) d (inc times))
        [n times])))

(defn factorize
  [n]
    (loop [n n
           factors []
           primes (primes)]
      (if (<= (first primes) n)
        (let [[n times] (div-times n (first primes))]
          (recur n (conj factors times) (next primes)))
        factors))))
share|improve this answer

How about:

(defn factors [n]
  (if (= n 1) '()
      (loop [i 2]
        (if (= 0 (mod n i)) (cons i (factors (/ n i)))
            (recur (inc i))))))

Use it like:

(factors 1000) -> (2 2 2 5 5 5)
share|improve this answer

Here's some Erlang code that does what you want.

I'm new to Erlang myself, so this probably isn't the BEST way to do it (in fact, I'd appreciate feedback from others).

-module(factor).
-export([factor/1]).

num_times_divides(A, B) ->
    num_times_divides(A, B, 0, 1).

num_times_divides(A, B, Count, Power) ->
    if
        (A rem B) == 0 -> num_times_divides(A div B, B, Count + 1, Power * B);
        true -> {Count, Power}
    end.

factor(N) ->
    factor(N, [], 2).
factor(1, Factor_List, _) ->
    Factor_List;
factor(N, Factor_List, F) ->
    {Count, Quotient} = num_times_divides(N, F),
    factor(N div Quotient, [Count | Factor_List], F + 1).
share|improve this answer

A Clojure solution that uses recursion to define a good abstraction

(defn map-state
  "Return a lazy seq of the state machine f's output when given the input in
coll and a initial state.  f must be defined so that (f state input) returns a
seq of the output and the next state."
  [f initial coll]
  (lazy-seq
   (if (seq coll)
     (let [[out state] (f initial (first coll))]
       (cons out (map-state f state (next coll)))))))

(def primes [2 3 5 7 11 13 17 19])

(defn factor
  "Return a seq of the exponents of the prime powers of n"
  [n]
  (letfn [(get-count [n prime]
        (if (= n 1)
          [:end 1]
          (let [divs (iterate #(/ % prime) n)
            [zeros rest] (split-with #(zero? (mod % prime)) divs)]
        [(count zeros) (first rest)])))]
    (take-while #(not= % :end) (map-state get-count n primes))))
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A must shorter Haskell solution that uses unfoldr. The list of exponents is lazy and never has any trailing zeros. The list Data.Numbers.Primes.primes is built lazily and the space is not released, I think you can use (wheelSieve 6) instead of "primes" if this is a space leak for you.

import Data.Numbers.Primes -- cabal install primes
import Data.List(unfoldr)

countFactors n = unfoldr iter (n,primes) where
  iter (x,p:ps) | x < p = Nothing
                | otherwise = let countP y acc = case quotRem y p of
                                                   (y2,0) -> countP y2 $! succ acc
                                                   _ -> (acc,(y,ps))
                              in Just (countP x 0)
share|improve this answer

Define a function factor that does exactly two things:

  1. Find a factor of the input number.
  2. Call factor with the result of dividing the input number by the found factor.

You will have to add something to step 1 in case there are no factors (i.e. the number is prime).

You can add another parameter to this function to represent the vector form that your output requires. Start with an empty list, and every time you find a factor, call factor recursively with a new list updated to represent the new factor you just found.

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This answer doesn't tell me anything that I already didn't know. –  one-zero-zero-one Aug 29 '10 at 20:02
12  
@Cheryl: Your question doesn't state what you already know, so how are we supposed to know what you know? –  Greg Hewgill Aug 29 '10 at 20:18
    
@Greg: Well give me direct code if possible. Implementation is where I am stuck. –  one-zero-zero-one Aug 29 '10 at 20:20
3  
Sorry, not sure I can help there. The intersection of my functional languages and your functional languages is the empty set. –  Greg Hewgill Aug 29 '10 at 20:20
2  
@Greg: Use any language you know. It'd be fine. –  one-zero-zero-one Aug 29 '10 at 20:23

Here's how I factored it, not sure if its what you're looking for...

factor :: Integer -> [Integer]
factor x = (filter (isFactor x) [1 .. (div x 2)]) ++ [x]
    where
        isFactor num possibleFactor = mod num possibleFactor == 0
share|improve this answer
    
Prime factors, yes. –  one-zero-zero-one Aug 29 '10 at 20:17

Here's a recursive solution in Python. Note, it needs a precomputed array of known primes <= sqrt(number).

def factor(number, primes):
    def divide(num,prime):
        if num%prime:
            return 0
        else:
            return 1+divide(num/prime,prime)

    if number==0 or len(primes)==0 or number<primes[0]:
        return []
    elif number%primes[0]:
        return [0]+factor(number,primes[1:])
    else:
        times=divide(number,primes[0])
        return [times]+factor(number/(primes[0]**times),primes[1:])

if __name__=='__main__':
    print factor(825,[2,3,5,7,11,13,17])
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My take (in Scala):

object PrimeFactors {

  // Generates infinite prime numbers' sequence using Eratosthenes' Seieve
  lazy val primes = {
    def sieve(s: Stream[Int]): Stream[Int] = s match {
      case x #:: xs => x #:: sieve(xs.filter(_ % x != 0))
    }
    sieve(Stream from 2)
  }

  // Divides a by b until the division gives a non-integral number.
  // Returns number of times division was carried out followed by the 
  // number obtained on final division.
  // For example, dividex(45, 3) gives (2, 5).
  def dividex(a: Double, b: Double) = {
    val s = Stream.iterate(a)(_ / b)
    val i = s.indexWhere(x => x.toInt != x) - 1
    (i, s(i).toInt)
  }

  def factorsOf(n: Int) = {
    def factors(i: Int, n: Int): List[Int] = {
      val (freq, n0) = dividex(n, primes(i))
      if(n0 > 1)
        freq :: factors(i + 1, n0)
      else
        freq :: Nil
    }
    factors(0, n).mkString("(", " ", ")")
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val n = readInt()
    println(factorsOf(n))
  }
}
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Another great example of how badly StackOverflow's syntax highlighting sucks. *Sigh!* –  missingfaktor Aug 30 '10 at 8:28

A fully tail recursive version

(defn factors [n]
  (loop [acc [] i 2 n n]
    (cond (= n 1)         acc
          (= 0 (mod n i)) (recur (conj acc i),      i , (/ n i) )
          :else           (recur         acc , (inc i),      n  ))))

Try:

(factors 1000) -> [2 2 2 5 5 5]
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Slightly more complicated than it needs to be, but goes much faster:

(defn factors [n]
  (loop [acc '() i 2 n n]
    (cond (= n 1)         acc
          (< n (* i i))   (cons n acc)
          (= 0 (mod n i)) (recur (cons i acc) i (/ n i) )
          :else           (recur acc     (inc i)     n  ))))

Try:

(time (factors 123456789012345678901234567890)) ;;7 msec
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a C# implementation

public void Test()
{
    var factors = Factorize(825)
        .GroupBy(x => x)
        .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.Count());

    var outputs = Primes()
        .TakeWhile(x => x <= factors.Max(y => y.Key))
        .Select(x => factors.ContainsKey(x) ? factors[x] : 0)
        .Select(x => x.ToString())
        .ToArray();

    Console.WriteLine(String.Join(", ", outputs));
}

public IEnumerable<int> Factorize(int input)
{
    int first = Primes()
        .TakeWhile(x => x <= Math.Sqrt(input))
        .FirstOrDefault(x => input % x == 0);
    return first == 0
            ? new[] { input }
            : new[] { first }.Concat(Factorize(input / first));
}

public IEnumerable<int> Primes()
{
    var ints = Enumerable.Range(2, Int32.MaxValue - 1);
    return ints.Where(x => !ints
                                .TakeWhile(y => y <= Math.Sqrt(x))
                                .Any(y => x % y == 0));
}

output:

0, 1, 2, 0, 1
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I realize than noone has given the J solution, which will be unbeatable:

_ q:825
0 1 2 0 1

Yes, that's the kind of things built-in in J.

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In Factor:

USING: assocs kernel math.primes math.primes.factors sequences ;
: count-factors ( n -- seq )
    group-factors [ last first primes-upto ] keep
    [ at 0 or ] curry map ;

Demo:

825 count-factors .
V{ 0 1 2 0 1 }
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Haskell version that gives the actual factors, where primes is an infinite lazy list of primes:

primefactors :: Integer -> [Integer]
primefactors 1 = []
primefactors x = [factor] ++ (primefactors (x `quot` factor))
  where factor = (head [n | n <- primes, (x `mod` n) == 0])

Usage:

*Main> primefactors 65535
[3,5,17,257]
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