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I'd like to detect from an application wether gdb is running. The standard way would be the following:

if (ptrace(PTRACE_TRACEME, 0, NULL, 0) == -1)
  printf("traced!\n");

In this case ptrace returns an error if the current process is traced (i.e. running it with gdb or attaching to it).

But there is a serious problem with this: if the call returns successfully, gdb may not attach to it later. Which is a problem since I'm not trying to implement anti-debug stuff. My purpose is to emit an 'int 3' when a contition is met (i.e. an assert fails) and gdb is running (otherwise I get a SIGTRAP which stops the application).

Disabling SIGTRAP and emitting an 'int 3' every time is not a good sollution because the application I'm testing might be using SIGTRAP for some other purpose (in which case I'm still screwed, so it wouldn't matter but it's the principle of the thing :))

Thanks

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You must find something like IsDebuggerPresent on POSIX –  Svisstack Aug 29 '10 at 22:03
1  
@Svisstack: Yes, that my question is roughly what that POSIX call/method would be. –  terminus Aug 29 '10 at 22:15
5  
You could fork a child which would try to PTRACE_ATTACH its parent (and then detach if necessary) and communicates the result back. It does seem a bit inelegant though. –  Huw Aug 29 '10 at 22:41
    
@Huw: That worked, thanks. If you write an answer I'll accept it. But the forking makes it rather costly. –  terminus Aug 29 '10 at 23:02

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Previously as a comment: you could fork a child which would try to PTRACE_ATTACH its parent (and then detach if necessary) and communicates the result back. It does seem a bit inelegant though.

As you mention, this is quite costly. I guess it's not too bad if assertions fail irregularly. Perhaps it'd be worthwhile keeping a single long-running child around to do this - share two pipes between the parent and the child, child does its check when it reads a byte and then sends a byte back with the status.

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The code I ended up using was the following:

int
gdb_check()
{
  int pid = fork();
  int status;
  int res;

  if (pid == -1)
    {
      perror("fork");
      return -1;
    }

  if (pid == 0)
    {
      int ppid = getppid();

      /* Child */
      if (ptrace(PTRACE_ATTACH, ppid, NULL, NULL) == 0)
        {
          /* Wait for the parent to stop and continue it */
          waitpid(ppid, NULL, 0);
          ptrace(PTRACE_CONT, NULL, NULL);

          /* Detach */
          ptrace(PTRACE_DETACH, getppid(), NULL, NULL);

          /* We were the tracers, so gdb is not present */
          res = 0;
        }
      else
        {
          /* Trace failed so gdb is present */
          res = 1;
        }
      exit(res);
    }
  else
    {
      waitpid(pid, &status, 0);
      res = WEXITSTATUS(status);
    }
  return res;
}

A few things:

  • When ptrace(PTRACE_ATTACH, ...) is successful, the traced process will stop and has to be continued.
  • This also works when gdb is attaching later.
  • A drawback is that when used frequently, it will cause a serious slowdown.
  • Also, this solution is only confirmed to work on Linux. As the comments mentioned, it won't work on BSD.

Anyway, thanks for the answers.

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2  
Your second call to ptrace is missing the pid parameter –  nevelis Sep 26 '12 at 22:24
1  
Better use _Exit instead of exit, or some exit handler might cause chaos. –  BeniBela Dec 13 '12 at 21:10
    
This also works for detecting lldb –  hoppjerka Nov 6 '13 at 22:01
    
This doesn't work on OSX (and presumably BSD) due to waitpid being interrupted with EINTR. See a fixed typo free version below... –  Arran Cudbard-Bell Jun 25 at 22:12
    
Confirmed not to work on BSD. PTRACE_CONT is also superfluous, detach will automatically cause the traced process to continue. –  Arran Cudbard-Bell Jun 27 at 10:06

I found that a modified version of the file descriptor "hack" described by Silviocesare and blogged by xorl worked well for me.

This is the modified code I use:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

// gdb apparently opens FD(s) 3,4,5 (whereas a typical prog uses only stdin=0, stdout=1,stderr=2)
int detect_gdb(void)
{
    int rc = 0;
    FILE *fd = fopen("/tmp", "r");

    if (fileno(fd) > 5)
    {
        rc = 1;
    }

    fclose(fd);
    return rc;
}
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1  
This is an awesome solution, thanks. –  terminus Jun 14 '12 at 12:22

I had a similar need, and came up with the following alternatives

static int _debugger_present = -1;
static void _sigtrap_handler(int signum)
{
    _debugger_present = 0;
    signal(SIGTRAP, SIG_DFL);
}

void debug_break(void)
{
    if (-1 == _debugger_present) {
        _debugger_present = 1;
        signal(SIGTRAP, _sigtrap_handler);
        raise(SIGTRAP);
    }
}

If called, the debug_break function will only interrupt if a debugger is attached.

If you are running on x86 and want a breakpoint which interrupts in the caller (not in raise), just include the following header, and use the debug_break macro:

#ifndef BREAK_H
#define BREAK_H

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <signal.h>

int _debugger_present = -1;
static void _sigtrap_handler(int signum)
{
    _debugger_present = 0;
    signal(SIGTRAP, SIG_DFL);
}

#define debug_break()                       \
do {                                        \
    if (-1 == _debugger_present) {          \
        _debugger_present = 1;              \
        signal(SIGTRAP, _sigtrap_handler);  \
        __asm__("int3");                    \
    }                                       \
} while(0)

#endif
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If you just want to know whether the app is running under gdb for debugging purposes, the simplest solution on Linux is to readlink("/proc/<ppid>/exe"), and search the result for "gdb".

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2  
Thanks, but it will not work when gdb attaches after the program is already running. –  terminus Aug 30 '10 at 6:27

On windows there is an API IsDebuggerPresent to check if process is under debugging. At linux, we can check this with another way (Not so efficient).

Check "/proc/self/status" for "TracerPid" attribute.

Example code:

#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int IsDebuggerPresent(void)
{
    char buf[1024];
    int debugger_present = 0;

    int status_fd = open("/proc/self/status", O_RDONLY);
    if (status_fd == -1)
        return 0;

    ssize_t num_read = read(status_fd, buf, sizeof(buf));

    if (num_read > 0)
    {
        static const char TracerPid[] = "TracerPid:";
        char *tracer_pid = strstr(buf, TracerPid);

        if (tracer_pid)
            debugger_present = !!atoi(tracer_pid + sizeof(TracerPid) - 1);
    }

    return debugger_present;
}
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Is "TracerPid" field of /proc/self/status available on every version of the Linux Kernel? –  osgx Jul 28 at 0:13
1  
@osgx. Did some quick check, the “TracerPid” is added by linux procfs at least since 2005 or even earlier. Also, I noticed that gdb & google perftools use same way to get or check the tracer pid. –  arsane Jul 28 at 8:50

This is similar to terminus' answer, but uses pipes for communication:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <sys/ptrace.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>

#if !defined(PTRACE_ATTACH) && defined(PT_ATTACH)
#  define PTRACE_ATTACH PT_ATTACH
#endif
#if !defined(PTRACE_DETACH) && defined(PT_DETACH)
#  define PTRACE_DETACH PT_DETACH
#endif

#ifdef __linux__
#  define _PTRACE(_x, _y) ptrace(_x, _y, NULL, NULL)
#else
#  define _PTRACE(_x, _y) ptrace(_x, _y, NULL, 0)
#endif

/** Determine if we're running under a debugger by attempting to attach using pattach
 *
 * @return 0 if we're not, 1 if we are, -1 if we can't tell.
 */
static int debugger_attached(void)
{
    int pid;

    int from_child[2] = {-1, -1};

    if (pipe(from_child) < 0) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Debugger check failed: Error opening internal pipe: %s", syserror(errno));
        return -1;
    }

    pid = fork();
    if (pid == -1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Debugger check failed: Error forking: %s", syserror(errno));
        return -1;
    }

    /* Child */
    if (pid == 0) {
        uint8_t ret = 0;
        int ppid = getppid();

        /* Close parent's side */
        close(from_child[0]);

        if (_PTRACE(PTRACE_ATTACH, ppid) == 0) {
            /* Wait for the parent to stop */
            waitpid(ppid, NULL, 0);

            /* Tell the parent what happened */
            write(from_child[1], &ret, sizeof(ret));

            /* Detach */
            _PTRACE(PTRACE_DETACH, ppid);
            exit(0);
        }

        ret = 1;
        /* Tell the parent what happened */
        write(from_child[1], &ret, sizeof(ret));

        exit(0);
    /* Parent */
    } else {
        uint8_t ret = -1;

        /*
         *  The child writes a 1 if pattach failed else 0.
         *
         *  This read may be interrupted by pattach,
         *  which is why we need the loop.
         */
        while ((read(from_child[0], &ret, sizeof(ret)) < 0) && (errno == EINTR));

        /* Ret not updated */
        if (ret < 0) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Debugger check failed: Error getting status from child: %s", syserror(errno));
        }

        /* Close the pipes here, to avoid races with pattach (if we did it above) */
        close(from_child[1]);
        close(from_child[0]);

        /* Collect the status of the child */
        waitpid(pid, NULL, 0);

        return ret;
    }
}

Trying the original code under OSX, I found waitpid (in the parent) would always return -1 with an EINTR (System call interrupted). This was caused by pattach, attaching to the parent and interrupting the call.

It wasn't clear whether it was safe to just call waitpid again (that seemed like it might behave incorrectly in some situations) so I just used a pipe to do the communication instead. It's a bit of extra code, but will probably work reliably across more platforms.

This code has been tested on OSX 10.9.3, Ubuntu 14.04 (3.13.0-24-generic) and FreeBSD 10.0.

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