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Is there a better way to do this?

SELECT subs. * ,
       CASE subs.member_type
         WHEN 'member' THEN 
         ( SELECT CONCAT_WS( ' ', members.first_name, members.last_name )
             FROM members
            WHERE members.id = subs.member_id)
         ELSE 
         ( SELECT members_anon.username
             FROM members_anon
            WHERE members_anon.id = subs.member_id)
       END AS fullname,
       CASE subs.member_type
         WHEN 'member' THEN 
         ( SELECT members.email
             FROM members
            WHERE members.id = subs.member_id)
         ELSE 
         ( SELECT members_anon.email
             FROM members_anon
            WHERE members_anon.id = subs.member_id)
       END AS email
  FROM subs
 WHERE subs.item_id =19
   AND subs.item_type = 'blog'
 LIMIT 0 , 30

Ideally I would like to have only one CASE section that returned name and email from the relevant table.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would use left outer joins on both tables:

SELECT subs. * ,
       CASE subs.member_type
         WHEN 'member' THEN CONCAT_WS( ' ', m.first_name, m.last_name )
         ELSE ma.username
       END AS fullname,
       CASE subs.member_type
         WHEN 'member' THEN m.email
         ELSE ma.email
       END AS email
  FROM subs
  LEFT OUTER JOIN members m on (m.id = subs.member_id)
  LEFT OUTER JOIN members_anon ma on (ma.id = subs.member_id)
 WHERE subs.item_id =19
   AND subs.item_type = 'blog'
 LIMIT 0 , 30

Regarding the only one case wish, if you need two different columns on your resultset, you will need two case sentences.

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Thanks for your answer, it works well. I'm not sure I totally get it though - are the LEFT OUTER joins only made if the comparison within their respective brackets evaluates true? –  Michael Robinson Aug 29 '10 at 23:26
    
Aha! I think I get it now. The case 'adds' selections to the SELECT portion, so if subs.member_type = 'member' then the SELECT bit will be: subs.*, m.username, m.email. So the LEFT OUTER on ma will be executed but not included in the result set. Right? I suppose this won't have any performance impact as all *.id columns are primary_keys? –  Michael Robinson Aug 29 '10 at 23:34

You can't use a single case expression to handle two separate columns...

Use:

   SELECT s. *,
          CASE s.member_type
            WHEN 'member' THEN x.fullname
            ELSE y.fullname
          END AS fullname,
          CASE subs.member_type
            WHEN 'member' THEN x.email
            ELSE y.email
          END AS email
     FROM SUBS s
LEFT JOIN (SELECT m.id,
                  CONCAT_WS( ' ', members.first_name, members.last_name ) AS fullname,
                  m.email
             FROM MEMBERS m) x ON x.id = s.member_id
LEFT JOIN (SELECT ma.id,
                  ma.username,
                  ma.email
             FROM MEMBERS_ANON ma) y ON y.id = s.member_id                         
    WHERE s.item_id = 19
      AND s.item_type = 'blog'
    LIMIT 0 , 30
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