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If I have an active System.Threading.Timer and I set it to null, is it stopped?

I realize that it is more proper to call .Dispose() but I would like an answer to the question as written.

public class Foo
{
   private System.Threading.Timer _timer;
   public Foo()
   {
      // initialize timer
   }

   public void KillTimer()
   {
      _timer=null;
   }
}

Update:

After much back and forth about whether setting a single reference to a System.Threading.Timer to null will indeed result stopping it have shown that

  1. there are no lingering references, e.g. events list, as a threading timer takes a sinlge callback and does not expose events.
  2. that if GC collects, the finalizer will indeed dispose the TimerBase and stop the timer.

spike

using System;
using System.Threading;

namespace SO_3597276
{
    class Program
    {
        private static System.Threading.Timer _timer;

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            _timer = new Timer((s) => Console.WriteLine("fired"), null, 1000, Timeout.Infinite);
            _timer = null;
            GC.Collect();
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

The timer callback is not called. Remove GC.Collect() and the callback is called.

Thanks all.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you think there are no more references to the Timer just because you set your variable to null? Presumably the Timer has been added to some system event queue for the purpose of noticing when it is time for the Timer to fire. Do you know if that event queue uses a WeakReference to refer to the Timer? (WeakReference is a Java concept: I don't know whether .NET has a similar concept) –  Adrian Pronk Aug 30 '10 at 5:35
    
@adrian - yes, .net has System.WeakReference. Regarding your question: the code above proves that there are no more references, otherwise the timer would fire 1 second into the readkey block. On a more technical note, when creating the timer, the callback is ultimately fed to private extern void AddTimerNative. Apparently what would normally be a .net delegate is handled in unmanaged code and not treated as a reference. I don't pretend to understand exactly what is happening there, but it makes sense in correlation with the code above. I hope will be some more discussion of this. –  Sky Sanders Aug 30 '10 at 6:09
    
@adrian - and as blindly throw darts at the problem, it occurs to me that the salient issue is that it is a function pointer that is being passed around as opposed to a delegate, thus no reference to the timer. –  Sky Sanders Aug 30 '10 at 6:25
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Not necessarily. Setting it to null, removes any references to it, and relies on the garbage collector to dispose of it.

If the timer went off before the GC got to it, it would trigger the event.

share|improve this answer
    
I like it, as it 1) agrees with what I supposed to be the case and 2) because it directly addresses the question, which implies that there is a single reference, and indeed, setting that to null will remove any references to it. I would have liked to see 'removes the sole reference' or some such, but close enough for gubment work. The other answers, while correct and informative, miss the point just slightly while still supporting your answer. I am inclined to accept this answer. –  Sky Sanders Aug 30 '10 at 1:53
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Why would it?

Consider:

  System.Threading.Timer t = ...;
  System.Threading.Timer q = t;
  q = null; // Should this stop it as well?

Setting to null is something you do to a variable, not something you do to an object. The Timer has no way of knowing you set a particular variable to null, and cannot take action on the basis of that.

EDIT:

To address the edit, even in the case of having a sole reference, it is not guaranteed that the Timer will be stopped, as it is possible the GC may not run after the reference has been set to null. This is not entirely unlikely either, the Microsoft .NET implementation uses a generational collector and a static field will likely survive a nursery collection and be promoted to an older generation. If your program has a relatively stable memory profile there may never be a collection of the older generations (and by extension the finalizer will not run until the end of the program).

share|improve this answer
    
The GC cleans up unreferenced objects automatically, so setting it to null "could" have an effect. –  Russell Aug 30 '10 at 1:15
    
@Russell if the collector runs, and if that was the only reference to the timer. There's not a direct cause and effect relationship between setting a variable to null and stopping a timer. –  Logan Capaldo Aug 30 '10 at 1:18
    
The cause/effect is "if the timer has no more references", then the GC will dispose of it. –  Russell Aug 30 '10 at 1:19
3  
"A correctly written program cannot rely on the side-effects of a finalizer." blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2010/08/09/10047586.aspx –  Josh Aug 30 '10 at 1:33
1  
@code: you say there are events, right? Nulling the field won't do anything about the delegate instances in the event list, which all hold a reference to the object. Really, the answer is: don't do that, it doesn't do what you think it does. –  John Saunders Aug 30 '10 at 3:10
show 17 more comments

I know you're asking about the System.Threading.Timer class, but I want to point out something rather important.

The answers provided so far are good. Logan and SLaks are right that setting any variable to null has no direct effect on the object to which the variable was previously assigned. Russell is right that when the garbage collector does eventually dispose of the timer, however, it will stop.

SLaks indicated that after setting a timer reference to null, there may be lingering references. In the simple example of one System.Threading.Timer reference, this is not the case.

But, if you have, for example, a System.Timers.Timer, and you handle its Elapsed event, then setting it to null will leave a reference and the timer will continue to run forever.

So consider this code for example:

var t = new System.Timers.Timer(1000.0);
t.AutoReset = true;
t.Elapsed += (sender, e) => Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now);

Console.Write("Press Enter to start the timer.");
Console.ReadLine();
t.Start();

Console.Write("Press Enter to set t to null.");
Console.ReadLine();

// This will not stop the timer. It actually does nothing at all to the timer
// to which t has been assigned.
t = null;

Console.Write("Press Enter again to perform a garbage collection.");
Console.ReadLine();

// This STILL will not stop the timer, as t was not the only reference to it
// (we created a new one when we added a handler to the Elapsed event).
GC.Collect();

Console.Write("t is null and garbage has been collected. Press Enter to quit.");
Console.ReadLine();

In the example above, as there is code holding onto a reference to t in order to handle its Elapsed event, the timer will never stop.

Again, I realize this is not the class you asked about; I only bring this up to point out that it is not always obvious whether in fact you do or do not have any more references to a given object.


UPDATE: It seems some confusion has sprung up on the topic of whether the statement I made above is equally true of a System.Threading.Timer object; it is not. To verify this, consider the following modification of the above code:

Console.Write("Press Enter to start the timer.");
Console.ReadLine();

var t = new System.Threading.Timer(
    state => { Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now); },
    null,
    0,
    1000
);

Console.Write("Press Enter to set t to null.");
Console.ReadLine();

// This will not stop the timer. It actually does nothing at all to the timer
// to which t has been assigned. HOWEVER, if/when the GC comes around to collect
// garbage, it will see that said timer has no active references; and so it will
// collect (and therefore finalize) it.
t = null;

Console.Write("Press Enter again to perform a garbage collection.");
Console.ReadLine();

// This WILL cause the timer to stop, as there is code in the type's
// finalizer to stop it.
GC.Collect();

Console.Write("t is null and garbage has been collected. Press Enter to quit.");
Console.ReadLine();

Here's why it doesn't work for System.Timers.Timer (or any type that has events, actually):

The answer is very easy to miss when we've defined our event handler like this:

t.Elapsed += (sender, e) => Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now);

What if I defined my handler like this instead?

t.Elapsed += (sender, e) => Console.WriteLine(sender.GetType());

Oh right! That sender argument that nobody ever pays any attention to!

The event-handling infrastructure provided by .NET requires that objects handling events maintain references to objects raising events. Otherwise, the contract provided by the very signature of the EventHandler delegate and all its cousins would be violated.

The moral of this story is: as soon as you add a handler to an event, you have created a new reference to an object. The only way to allow that object to be garbage collected after this point is to remove the handler -- but this may be quite difficult if you've set the only other reference to said object to null (this is one of the very few examples of a case where a .NET program may have a "memory leak").

share|improve this answer
    
Very good point. There's also the Windows Forms Timer and WPF DispatcherTimer and I would not be surprised if they are tracked by internal references too. –  Josh Aug 30 '10 at 2:20
    
thanks. as usual, you bring good points to the discussion. –  Sky Sanders Aug 30 '10 at 2:23
    
dan, john brought up a good point that seems to overlap both slaks answer and this one.. the handler delegates that are in the events list. not entirely clear that this list is not a member of the timer and thus nulled with it. –  Sky Sanders Aug 30 '10 at 3:21
    
never mind. for some reason i keep not understanding that nulling the reference does not null the object. so there are lingering references even with a System.Threading.Timer –  Sky Sanders Aug 30 '10 at 3:26
    
@code poet: There are not lingering references with System.Threading.Timer if you only had one reference to it. If you set that reference to null, then there are no more active references, and when the timer is garbage collected (and therefore finalized) it will indeed stop. The reason System.Timers.Timer is different is that once you have attached a handler to its Elapsed event, right away there is a new reference to the timer, and it will never be garbage collected. I will update my answer to explain this hopefully more clearly. –  Dan Tao Aug 30 '10 at 4:53
show 3 more comments

No, it will not stop.

Setting a variable to null does not directly have any side-effects such as stopping a timer. (Unless it's a property)

Since the timer has other references, the GC will not collect it, and it will never stop.

share|improve this answer
    
hey slaks. what other references are we talking about? –  Sky Sanders Aug 30 '10 at 1:43
1  
@kbrimington: The working example is not realistic because in this app the garbage collector may never run. Add a GC.Collect line and you will see that then the timer stops. So it isn't really accurate to say "it will never stop." It just may not (in fact, almost certainly will not) stop in any sort of deterministic way right after been set to null. –  Dan Tao Aug 30 '10 at 2:00
1  
@kbrimington - you should probably add the code example as your own answer. I don't know that it's really respectful to edit a 75k+'ers answer to add your own code. For example, if it had mistakes or didn't make SLaks' point, it would reflect on him as most people aren't going to look through the history. –  Josh Aug 30 '10 at 2:10
    
@Josh - Fair enough. I had hoped only to help. –  kbrimington Aug 30 '10 at 2:53
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