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Why does everyone tell me writing code like this is a bad practice?

if (foo)
    Bar();

//or

for(int i = 0 i < count; i++)
    Bar(i);

My biggest argument for omitting the curly braces is that it can sometimes be twice as many lines with them. For example, here is some code to paint a glow effect for a label in C#.

using (Brush br = new SolidBrush(Color.FromArgb(15, GlowColor)))
{
    for (int x = 0; x <= GlowAmount; x++)
    {
        for (int y = 0; y <= GlowAmount; y++)
        {
            g.DrawString(Text, this.Font, br, new Point(IconOffset + x, y));
        }
     }
 }
 //versus
using (Brush br = new SolidBrush(Color.FromArgb(15, GlowColor)))
    for (int x = 0; x <= GlowAmount; x++)
        for (int y = 0; y <= GlowAmount; y++)
            g.DrawString(Text, this.Font, br, new Point(IconOffset + x, y));

You can also get the added benefit of chaining usings together without having to indent a million times.

using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bmp))
{
    using (Brush brush = new SolidBrush(backgroundColor))
    {
        using (Pen pen = new Pen(Color.FromArgb(penColor)))
        {
            //do lots of work
        }
    }
 }
//versus
using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bmp))
using (Brush brush = new SolidBrush(backgroundColor))
using (Pen pen = new Pen(Color.FromArgb(penColor)))
{
    //do lots of work
}

The most common argument for curly braces revolves around maintance programming, and the problems that would ensue by inserting code between the original if statement and its intended result:

if (foo)
    Bar();
    Biz();

Questions:

  1. Is it wrong to want to use the more compact syntax which the language offers? The people that design these languages are smart, I can't imagine they would put a feature which is always bad to use.
  2. Should we or Shouldn't we write code so the lowest common denominator can understand and have no problems working with it?
  3. Is there another argument that I'm missing?
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closed as not constructive by casperOne Feb 15 '12 at 1:19

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3  
This comes across more like a rant than a question. It's like you're saying, "I know why it's bad but I just don't care." –  Robert S. Dec 11 '08 at 15:52
4  
I agree with you. Omit them. Period. –  Andrei Rînea Dec 17 '08 at 1:53
16  
Use Python and forget about this :) –  Vanuan Jun 19 '09 at 19:57
25  
WHO CARES ABOUT HOW MANY LINES SOMETHING IS IT IS IN 2010. Monitors are wide and cheap and high res! My monitor is 2048 X 1152 and I have TWO of them! Readability is way more important that saving 2 vertical lines when you can easily introduce subtle errors that are hard to find. –  Jarrod Roberson Jan 24 '10 at 2:20
16  
Monitors are wide and cheap, but they aren't tall and cheap. Vertical space is more scarce than horizontal space. –  Adam Ruth Jul 8 '12 at 22:23
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52 Answers 52

up vote 117 down vote accepted

Actually, the only time that's ever really bit me was when I was debugging, and commented out bar():

if(foo)
  // bar();
doSomethingElse();

Other than that, I tend to use:

if(foo) bar();

Which takes care of the above case.

EDIT Thanks for clarifying the question, I agree, we should not write code to the lowest common denominator.

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22  
That's rough of course, but I think the biggest problem for maintainers is that they will add a second line, and not realize it's not a part of the conditional statement even though it REALLY looks like it should be. –  danieltalsky Dec 12 '08 at 5:48
13  
I don't like the one liner style because I always go looking for the loop body below. –  Nosredna Jun 19 '09 at 0:28
9  
I find the one-liner style more irritating than helpful because (especially in deep nesting -- ugh) the statement can be easily overread and confusion may ensue. I almost exclusively use such single-statement ifs for input validation (i.e. early returns) or loop control (e.g. ignoring irrelevant file names in filesystem walks), though, where blank lines help setting them off from the main code. –  pluma Feb 5 '10 at 0:10
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Speed of reading...

Aside from what has already been mentioned. At this point, I've already been conditioned to parse if statements with braces and white space. So I read:

if (condition)
{
    DoSomething();
}

DoSomethingElse();

Slightly faster than I read:

if (condition) DoSomething();

DoSomethingElse();

I read it a little slower if it looks like this:

if (condition) DoSomething();
DoSomethingElse();

I read this significantly slower than the prior:

if (condition) 
    DoSomething();
DoSomethingElse();

beause I can't help but read it again just in-case and wonder if the author intended:

if (condition)
{
    DoSomething();
    DoSomethingElse();
}

Already covered in general, but when it comes to reading the below, I'll be looking into this for quite a while to make sure what the author intended. I may even hunt down the original author to confirm.

if (condition) 
    DoSomething();
    DoSomethingElse();
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13  
The problem is solved when, in your 4th sample, you just put an empty line after if statement to seperate it from DoSomethingElse() That's what I do and readability is practically the same as with the 1st sample (if not better ;-P) Another thing is that putting lines in groups of 2 or 3 signifficantly helps readibility, you just scan through the code much faster. –  Piotr Owsiak Aug 19 '09 at 0:17
5  
Maybe it's because I'm used to Python, but putting the first curly brace on the same line as the if statement allows me to read+understand it even quicker. –  Wallacoloo Jan 24 '10 at 2:30
7  
The problem with the braceless style it makes you waste your precious concentration thinking about whether or not the block has braces rather than more important things. This alone is a good enough reason to use the simplest possible convention, which is braces always. –  Nate C-K Feb 5 '10 at 0:02
1  
Braces are explicit by nature. I'll stick with that, thanks. –  TheOptimusPrimus Sep 4 '13 at 14:39
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If it's something small, write it like this:

if(foo()) bar();

If it's long enough to break into two lines, use braces.

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6  
Not very debugger-friendly, though. How do you set up a breakpoint on the "bar" part? –  Nemanja Trifunovic Dec 11 '08 at 19:17
3  
@Nemanja: Just put your cursor on bar(); and hit F9. Both VS2005 and VS2008 handle intra-line breakpoints, if they're separate "statements". –  GalacticCowboy Dec 11 '08 at 19:52
2  
GalanticCowboy: There are more environments than those you know. :-) –  user14070 Dec 11 '08 at 22:25
13  
Sure, but since the context is C#, that should cover a significant majority of the users... –  GalacticCowboy Dec 12 '08 at 0:18
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I prefer the clarity that the curly brace offers. You know exactly what is meant and don't have to guess if someone just goofed and left them off (and introduced a bug). The only time I omit them is when I put the if and action on the same line. I don't do that very often either. I actually prefer the whitespace introduced by putting the curly brace on its own line, though from years of K&R C-like programming, ending the line with a brace is a practice I have to work to overcome if the IDE doesn't enforce it for me.

if (condition) action();  // ok by me

if (condition) // normal/standard for me
{
   action();
}
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This is not always considered a bad practice. The Mono Project Coding Guidelines suggests not to use curly braces if it's not necessary. The same for the GNU Coding Standards. I think it's a matter of personal taste as always with coding standards.

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2  
Looking at Mono code seems quite foreign to me after reading the whole guideline. –  Sung Oct 23 '09 at 3:44
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I also used to think it's better to only use braces when really needed. But not anymore, the main reason, when you have a lot of code, it does make it more readable and you can parse over the code quicker when you have a consistent bracing style.

Another good reason for always using braces, besides someone adding a second statement to the if, is something like this could happen:

if(a)
   if(b)
     c();
else
   d();

Did you notice that the else clause is actually that of the "if(b)"? You probably did, but would you trust anyone to be familiar with this gotcha?

So, if just for consistency and because you never know what unexpected things might happen when someone else (it's always the others that are stupid) changes the code, I always put braces, because it makes the source code more readable, quicker to parse by your brain. Only for the most simple if statements, like an if where a delegation is made or is switch-like, where you know the clause will never be extended, I would leave out the braces.

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5  
This is one of the two cases where I do use braces. Otherwise not. –  Andrei Rînea Dec 17 '08 at 1:56
3  
This should rather be written as if (a && b) ... in the first place methinks. –  alexander.biskop Feb 20 '13 at 10:55
4  
@alexander.biskop: Surely not, since that gives the else block a different meaning (!a || !b) than either with (!a) or without (a && !b) added braces. –  Ben Voigt Jul 30 '13 at 18:47
2  
@alexander.biskop: At the same time, debugging is easier with nested ifs each with simpler conditions, since you can single step onto each. –  Ben Voigt Jul 30 '13 at 19:42
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Lines are cheap. Processor power is cheap. Developer time is very expensive.

As a general rule, unless I am developing some absolutely resource / speed critical application, I would always err on the side of writing code that is

(a) Easy for any other developer to follow what I am doing

(b) Comment specific parts of the code that may need it

(c) Easy to debug if something goes wrong

(d) Easy to modify if it needs to be in future (i.e. adding / removing code)

The speed or academic elegance of the code is secondary to these factors from a Business perspective. This is not to say I set out to write clunky or ugly code, but this is MY order of priority.

By omitting curly braces in most instances, it for me makes (b), (c) and (d) more difficult (note not impossible however). I would say that using curly braces or not has not effect on (a).

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4  
Your last statement about (a) is an opinion that a large number of devs, including other posters here, would argue. –  Kelly S. French Aug 7 '12 at 15:35
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I think it's a matter of guidelines for the project you are working on and personal taste.

I usually omit them when they are not needed, except some cases like the following:

if (something)
    just one statement; // i find this ugly
else
{
    // many
    // lines
    // of code
}

i prefer

if (something)
{
    just one statement; // looks better:)
}
else
{
    // many
    // lines
    // of code
}
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One of the instances where this can bite you is back in the old days of C/C++ macros. I know this is a C# question, but often coding standards carry over without the reasons why the standard was created in the first place.

If you aren't very careful when you create your macros, you can end up causing problems with if statements that don't use the {}.

#define BADLY_MADE_MACRO(x) function1(x); function2(x);

if (myCondition) BADLY_MADE_MACRO(myValue)

Now, don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that you should always do {} just to avoid this problem in C/C++, but I have had to deal with some very strange bugs because of this.

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2  
if only all code declared itself as such... sigh –  Nathan Strong Dec 11 '08 at 23:17
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I agree that "if you are smart enough to get someone to pay you to write code, you should be smart enough to not rely solely on indentation to see the flow of the code."

However... mistakes can be made, and this one is a pain to debug... especially if you're coming in looking at someone else's code.

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My philosophy is if it makes the code more readable, why not do it?

Obviously you have to draw the line somewhere, like finding that happy medium between concise and overly descriptive variable names. But brackets really do avoid errors and improve the readability of the code.

You can argue that people smart enough to be coders are going to be smart enough to avoid bugs that stem bracketless statements. But can you honestly say you've never been tripped up by something as simple as a spelling error? Minutia like this can be overwhelming when looking at large projects.

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4  
Of course this is very subjective. Leaving them off sometime improves the readability. –  Brian Knoblauch Dec 11 '08 at 15:50
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There are always exceptions, but I would argue against omitting braces only when it's in one of the forms:

if(x == y)
   for(/* loop */)
   {
      //200 lines
   }

//rampion's example:
for(/* loop */)
{
   for(/* loop */)
      for(/* loop */)
      {
         //several lines
      }
}

Otherwise, I have no problem with it.

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4  
Bad examples. In both of those cases, I would factor that 200 line for loop into its own method, or preferably several methods. –  Adam Jaskiewicz Dec 11 '08 at 16:02
1  
True, but it DOES happen. Plus, any time a block is longer than the reader's screen is high, you'll have this issue. And you can't control your code reader's screen height. They might only see a couple lines on each side. –  rampion Dec 11 '08 at 16:45
2  
It does happen. That doesn't mean it should happen. –  Adam Jaskiewicz Dec 11 '08 at 17:48
1  
@AdamJaskiewicz Right. It does happen. We have to think about what does happen, rather than what should happen. If we could restrict ourselves to what should happen we wouldn't need to worry about bugs. –  Beska Aug 16 '12 at 12:45
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I use to think the same way.

Until one day ( why is there always that "one day" that changes your life forever? ) we spend from 24 - 36 hours straight without sleep debugging production code only to find out someone didn't put braces combined with a search/replace change.

It was something like this.

 if( debugEnabled ) 
      println( "About to save 1 day of work to some very important place.");
 saveDayData();

What came after was

 if( debugEnabled ) 
 //     println( "About to save 1 day of work to some very important place.");
 saveDayData();

It turns out that the system was generating 500 mb of logs daily and we were asked to stop it. The debug flag was not enough so a search and replace println was in order.

Still when the app went to production the debug flag was off and the important "saveDayData" was never called.

EDIT

Now the only place where I don't use the braces is in if/try construct.

if( object != null ) try { 
     object.close();
} catch( .....

After watching a superstar developer doing that.

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Your main arguments against using braces are that they use additional lines and that they require additional indenting.

Lines are (almost) free, minimizing the number of lines in your code shouldn't be an objective.

And indentation is independent of brace usage. In your cascading 'using' example I still think you should be indenting them even when you omit the braces.

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I occasionally use the very bottom code (multiple using statements), but other than that I always put the braces in. I just find it makes the code clearer. It's blatantly obvious from more than just indentation that a statement is part of a block (and thus probably part of an if etc).

I have seen the

if (...)
    foo();
    bar();

bug bite me (or rather "me and colleagues" - I didn't actually introduce the bug) once. This was despite the fact that our coding standards at the time recommended using braces everywhere. It took me a surprisingly long time to spot - because you see what you want to see. (This was about 10 years ago. Maybe I'd find it faster now.)

Of course if you use "brace at the end of the line" it reduces the extra lines incurred, but I personally dislike that style anyway. (I use it at work, and have found it less unpleasant than I expected, but it's still a bit unpleasant.)

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1  
Best solution to this bug: Use Python. (Kidding, of course.) –  Joel Wietelmann Dec 11 '08 at 17:28
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One of the main issues is when you have regions of one-liners and non-one liners, along with separation from the control statment (for, if, what have you) and the end of the statment.

For example:

for (...)
{
  for (...)
    for (...) 
    {
      // a couple pages of code
    }
  // which for block is ending here?  A good text editor will tell you, 
  // but it's not obvious when you're reading the code
}
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3  
Why do you have a couple pages of code in your for loop anyway? –  Adam Jaskiewicz Dec 11 '08 at 16:04
3  
The couple of pages of code should be in a separate function, usually. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 11 '08 at 20:10
1  
excuse me, I meant I was playing the role of such a clod. However, I hold that the same problem can occur for shorter regions, when viewed through a small viewport. And that's outside the coder's control. –  rampion Dec 12 '08 at 3:15
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I used to be a huge supporter of "curly braces are a MUST!", but since adopting unit testing, I find that my unit tests protect braceless statements from the scenarios like:

if (foo)
    snafu();
    bar();

With good unit tests, I can confidently omit curly braces for simple statements to improve readability (yes, that can be subjective).

Alternatively, for something like the above, I would likely inline that to look like:

if (foo) snafu();

That way, the developer who needs to add bar() to the condition, would be more apt to recognize the lack of curly braces, and add them.

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2  
You said "I don't need it" then gave a reason for using it: readability! –  tvanfosson Dec 11 '08 at 15:50
4  
I wouldn't rely on a Unit Test to find that. LINT maybe, Unit test no! –  Kristen Feb 28 '09 at 7:00
2  
@Kristen - The idea of the unit test is to assert the behavior of the method. If the behavior changes (as described above) the unit test will fail. I don't see the problem in that. –  Liggy Nov 27 '09 at 14:05
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Out of the three conventions:

if(addCurleyBraces()) bugFreeSofware.hooray();

and:

if(addCurleyBraces())
    bugFreeSofware.hooray();

and (which represent any indentation style using an opening and a closing brace):

if(addCurleyBraces()) {
    bugFreeSofware.hooray();
}

I prefer the last one as:

  • I find it easier to read if all the if-statements are written in a uniform way.
  • It may make the software a tiny bit more robust and bug free. However all modern IDE's and advanced text editors have nice auto-indenting features which I think everyone should use as long as it doesn't mess up comment formatting or go against team standards (in a lot of cases it's possible to create a custom formatting scheme and share it with the team). My point here is that if indentation is done correctly risk of bug introduction is reduced a bit.
  • I prefer the boolean expression and statement(s) to execute to be on different lines. I like to be able to mark a row for debugging purposes. Even if I'm using an IDE where I may mark a statement and step to it, it's an interactive operation and I might forget where I started to debug or at least it will take me a little bit more time to step through the code several times (as I have to mark the position manually each time during debugging).
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Reducing lines is not really a good argument for dropping braces. If your method is too big, it should probably be refactored into smaller pieces or restructured. Doing that will no doubt increase readability more than simply taking out braces.

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Use some personal judgement.

if (foo)
  bar();

is fine by itself. Unless you're really worried about morons putting in something like this later:

if (foo)
  bar();
  baz();

If you're not worried about morons, you're fine (I'm not -- if they can't get basic code syntax right, this is the least of their problems)>

In exchange, it's a lot more readable.

The rest of the time:

if (foo) {
  bar();
  baz();
}

Which has been my favorite as long as I can remember. Additionally:

if (foo) {
  bar();
  baz();
} else {
  qux();
}

Works for me.

Vertical space by itself isn't terribly relevant, readability is. The opening brace on a line by itself just stops the conversation for a syntactic element, until your eye moves down to the next line. Not what I like.

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Let's say you have some code:

if (foo)
    bar();

and then someone else comes along and adds:

if (foo)
    snafu();
    bar();

According to the way it's written, bar(); is now executed unconditionally. By including the curly braces, you prevent this kind of accidental error. Code should be written in such a way as to make such mistakes difficult or impossible to make. If I was doing a code review and saw the missing braces, especially spread across multiple lines, I would create a defect. In cases where it is justified, keep it on one line so that the chance of making such an error is again kept to a minimum.

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I always omit them when appropriate, such as in your first example. Clean, concise code I can see and understand by glancing at is easier to maintain, debug and understand than code I have to scroll through and read line by line. I think most programmers will agree with this.

It is easy for it to get out of hand if you start doing multiple nesting, if/else clauses and so on, but I think most programmers should be able to tell where to draw the line.

I see it kind of like the argument for if ( foo == 0 ) vs if ( 0 == foo ). The latter may prevent bugs for new programmers (and maybe even occasionally for veterans), while the former is easier to quickly read and understand when you're maintaining code.

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I'm a strong believer in writing tidy and concise code, but I would always use curly braces. I find that they are a convenient way of quickly seeing the scope in which a particular line of code exists. There is no ambiguity, it's just explicitly set out in front of you.

Some may say it is a case of preference, but I find the logical flow of a program much easier to follow if it is internally consistent, and I don't believe that it is consistent to write one IF statement like this;

if(x < y)
    x = y;
else
    y = x;

And another like this;

if(x < y)
{
    x = y;
    x++;
}
else
{
    y = x;
    y++;
}

I prefer to just pick one general style and stick with it :)

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To be blunt I see it as:

Good programmers program defensively, Bad programmers don't.

Since there are several examples above and my own similar experiences with bugs related to forgetting braces then I learned the hard way to ALWAYS PUT BRACES.

Anything else is choosing personal style over safety and that's clearly bad programming.

Joel even mentions this in Making Wrong Code Look Wrong

Once you get bit by a bug because of missing braces you learn that missing braces look wrong because you know it's a potential place for another bug to occur.

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I am impressed and humbled that my peers in this field of computer programming (you lot) are not daunted by the prospect of potential bugs when you skip the braces on single line blocks.

I suppose it means I'm not smart. I have made mistakes around this multiple times. I have debugged others' mistakes around this. I have watched software ship with bugs because of this (RDP to a machine running VS2002 and your watch window font will go wonky).

If I look at all the mistakes I've made that could have been avoided with a change in coding style, the list is very long. If I hadn't changed my approach in each of these cases, I probably would never have made it as a programmer. Again, I guess I'm not smart. To compensate, I have been a staunch user of braces on single-line blocks for a long time.

That said, some things have changed in the world that make the "thou shalt use braces on single-line blocks" rule less relevant today than when Moses brought it down to us:

  • Some popular languages make the issue go away by making the computer read the indentation, just like the programmer does (e.g. Python).

  • My editor automatically formats for me, so the chances of me getting mislead by indentation is much reduced.

  • TDD means that if I introduce a bug because I get confused by a single-line block, I'm much more likely to discover the bug quickly.

  • Refactoring and language expressiveness mean that my blocks are much shorter, and single-line blocks happen much more often than the used to. Hypothetically, with a ruthless application of ExtractMethod, I could possibly have only single-line blocks in my whole program. (I wonder what that would look like?)

In fact, there's a distinct benefit can come of refactoring ruthlessly & omitting braces on single-line blocks: when you see braces, a little alarm can go off in your head that says "complexity here! beware!". Imagine if this was the norm:

if (condition) Foo();   // normal, everyday code

if (condition) 
{
    // something non-trivial hapening; pay attention!
    Foo();
    Bar();
}

I'm opening myself to the idea of changing my coding convention to something like "single-line blocks may never have braces" or "if you can put the block on the same line as the condition, and it all fits within 80 characters, omit the braces". We'll see.

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Most times it is ingrained as a coding standard, whether for a company or an FOSS project.

Ultimately someone else will need to grok your code and it is a major time drain for each developer to have to figure out the specific style of the section of code they are working on.

Also, imagine that someone is going between Python and a Cish language more than once a day... In Python indenting is part of the block symantics of the language and it would be quite easy to make a mistake like the one you quote.

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Okay, this is an old question that has been answered to death. I have something to add.

First I just have to say USE THE BRACES. They can only help readability, and readability (for yourself and others!) should be very high on your priority list unless you're writing assembly. Unreadable code always, always leads to bugs. If you find that braces make your code take up too much space, your methods are probably too long. Most or all of any method should fit within one screen height if you're doing it right, and Find (F3) is your friend.

Now for my addition: There is a problem with this:

if (foo) bar();

Try setting a breakpoint that will only be hit if bar() is going to run. You can do this in C# by putting the cursor on the second half of the code, but that is not obvious and is a bit of a pain. In C++ you couldn't do it at all. One of our most senior developers working on C++ code insists on breaking 'if' statements into two lines for this reason. And I agree with him.

So do this:

if (foo)
{
    bar(); //It is easy to put a breakpoint here, and that is useful.
}
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Err on the side of more secure - just one more bug you potentially won't have to fix.

I personally feel more secure if all of my blocks are wrapped in curlys. Even for one-liners, these are simple notations that easily prevent mistakes. It makes the code more readable in the sense that you clearly see what is in the block as not to confuse the body of the block with the following statements outside of the block.

If I have a one-liner, I typically format it as follows:

if( some_condition ) { do_some_operation; }

If the line is just too cumbersome then use the following:

if( some_condition )
{
    do_some_operation;
}
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An alternative method which combines the best of both worlds is this:

if(foo)
   {DoSomething();}

This avoids any confusion if the line is commented out, or another line is added below it.

Also, we use MISRA-C as a coding standard, which requires all constructs like this to use braces under all circumstances.

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  1. Whitespace is free.
  2. Depending on indentation for future readability means depending on tab settings, which is not a good idea. Ever worked on ten-year-old code that wasn't under revision control?
  3. My experience is that any time you saved by not typing curly braces is more than lost by the extra time it takes me to figure out what you meant.
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