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Why does everyone tell me writing code like this is a bad practice?

if (foo)
    Bar();

//or

for(int i = 0 i < count; i++)
    Bar(i);

My biggest argument for omitting the curly braces is that it can sometimes be twice as many lines with them. For example, here is some code to paint a glow effect for a label in C#.

using (Brush br = new SolidBrush(Color.FromArgb(15, GlowColor)))
{
    for (int x = 0; x <= GlowAmount; x++)
    {
        for (int y = 0; y <= GlowAmount; y++)
        {
            g.DrawString(Text, this.Font, br, new Point(IconOffset + x, y));
        }
     }
 }
 //versus
using (Brush br = new SolidBrush(Color.FromArgb(15, GlowColor)))
    for (int x = 0; x <= GlowAmount; x++)
        for (int y = 0; y <= GlowAmount; y++)
            g.DrawString(Text, this.Font, br, new Point(IconOffset + x, y));

You can also get the added benefit of chaining usings together without having to indent a million times.

using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bmp))
{
    using (Brush brush = new SolidBrush(backgroundColor))
    {
        using (Pen pen = new Pen(Color.FromArgb(penColor)))
        {
            //do lots of work
        }
    }
 }
//versus
using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bmp))
using (Brush brush = new SolidBrush(backgroundColor))
using (Pen pen = new Pen(Color.FromArgb(penColor)))
{
    //do lots of work
}

The most common argument for curly braces revolves around maintance programming, and the problems that would ensue by inserting code between the original if statement and its intended result:

if (foo)
    Bar();
    Biz();

Questions:

  1. Is it wrong to want to use the more compact syntax which the language offers? The people that design these languages are smart, I can't imagine they would put a feature which is always bad to use.
  2. Should we or Shouldn't we write code so the lowest common denominator can understand and have no problems working with it?
  3. Is there another argument that I'm missing?
share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by casperOne Feb 15 '12 at 1:19

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
I agree with you. Omit them. Period. –  Andrei Rînea Dec 17 '08 at 1:53
18  
Use Python and forget about this :) –  Vanuan Jun 19 '09 at 19:57
27  
WHO CARES ABOUT HOW MANY LINES SOMETHING IS IT IS IN 2010. Monitors are wide and cheap and high res! My monitor is 2048 X 1152 and I have TWO of them! Readability is way more important that saving 2 vertical lines when you can easily introduce subtle errors that are hard to find. –  Jarrod Roberson Jan 24 '10 at 2:20
19  
Monitors are wide and cheap, but they aren't tall and cheap. Vertical space is more scarce than horizontal space. –  Adam Ruth Jul 8 '12 at 22:23
4  
@AdamRuth Turn them sideways :) –  Zachary Yates Sep 8 '13 at 2:12

52 Answers 52

  1. Whitespace is free.
  2. Depending on indentation for future readability means depending on tab settings, which is not a good idea. Ever worked on ten-year-old code that wasn't under revision control?
  3. My experience is that any time you saved by not typing curly braces is more than lost by the extra time it takes me to figure out what you meant.
share|improve this answer

They tell you because they still use ancient or generic (not language-aware) source code editors. If you use an editor with auto-indent, you will never make a mistake that could have been avoided by using curly brackets all the time.

share|improve this answer

I'm quite happy to:

foreach (Foo f in foos)
  foreach (Bar b in bars)
    if (f.Equals(b))
      return true;

return false;

Personally, I don't see why

foreach (Foo f in foos)
{
  foreach (Bar b in bars)
  {
    if (f.Equals(b))
    {
      return true;
    }
  }
}

return false;

is any more readable.

Yes, lines are free, but why should I have to scroll through pages and pages of code when it could be half the size?

If there is a difference in readability or maintainability then, sure, put braces in... but in this case I don't see any reason to.

Also, I will always put braces for nested if's where I have nested else's

if (condition1)
  if (condition2)
    doSomething();
  else (condition2)
    doSomethingElse();

vs

if (condition1)
  if (condition2)
    doSomething();
else (condition2)
  doSomethingElse();

is terribly confusing, so I always write it as:

if (condition1)
{
  if (condition2)
    doSomething();
  else (condition2)
    doSomethingElse();
}

Whenever possible, I use ternary operators, but I never nest them.

share|improve this answer

I think it all boils down to preference and readability. Generally adding curly braces will make your code a lot more readable because of the extra space between the actual lines with code. Also, consider this example (not indented on purpose):

if (condition1)
if (condition2)
doSomething();
else
doSomethingElse();

When does doSomethingElse get called? When condition1 is true but condition2 is false, or when condition1 is false? Adding curly braces quickly solves this readability problem and avoids confusion.

share|improve this answer

I used to hate the braces myself. Until one day I found a use for them. I work on different platforms porting the application from platform to platform (work on 6 in total). On UNIX if you have vim installed, then you can easily jump to the ending or beginning of a code block by pressing 'Shift + 5'. These mostly are if/else blocks or loops.

So if i were looking at Rampion's problem on vim, I'd be totally lost and would take me a while to fully understand the code.

share|improve this answer

Paul said:

And indentation is independent of brace usage.

That's not true with some coding styles. Where I work, the company's coding standard allows us to do without braces if they're not strictly necessary; however, the coding standard makes us indent the braces as well as what's in them, so we end up with something like this:

if (something)
  {
    for (i = 0; i < count; i++)
      {
        foo();
      }
  }

Without the braces, this becomes:

if (something
  for (i = 0; i < count; i++)
    foo();

With this coding style, when there is deep nesting, together with long variable and function names and you always use braces, you either get lots of code going off the right side of the screen or a lot of line wrapping, both of which, IMO, make the code cumbersome to read or debug. For this reason, I always tend to leave the braces out whenever I can get away with doing so.

As for putting a single statement on the same line as the if, some companies' coding standards (ours included) forbid that, so it's not always an option.

If it were my choice, I would change the company coding standard to have the braces level with the if, for, etc. and have the first line (or comment) in the body on the same line as the opening brace, thus:

if (something)
{ for (i = 0; i < count; i++)
  { foo();
  }
}

I'd be much more willing (and much more likely) to always use braces then (and would even go so far as to support an 'always use braces' rule), because each pair of braces would add only one extra line and no indentation, making it almost as compact as having no braces at all.

share|improve this answer

  • Write the opened bracket on the same line as previous statement:

    if ( any ) {
        DoSomething();
    }
    

  • If you think, this is too big, you can write it in one line:

    if ( any ) { DoSomething(); }
    

    If you think, in one line is not readable so good, you can write it in two lines:

    if ( any ) {
        DoSomething(); }
    if ( any )
        { DoSomething(); }
    
    • In future someone will need change one statement to more statements. Without brackets is the change more complicated. Yes only littlebit, but is better prevent bugs. And writing brackets is very easy a cheap way.
  • share|improve this answer

    Your maintanence programmer may forget to add curly braces later if he/she adds logic to the app. So the following happens:

    if(foo)
    bar();
    bar(delete);
    

    Instead of

    if(foo) {
    bar();
    }
     bar(delete);
    
    share|improve this answer

    I don't think that omitting braces is always a bad practice but whether is should be allowed and under what circumstances must be agreed in the team.

    I find this very readable:-

    if (foo)
        bar();
    

    and this:-

    if (foo)
        bar()
    else
        snafu();
    

    If an extra line is added to these:-

    if (foo)
        bar();
        snafu();
    

    This looks all wrong, there is a block of code, indented. but not braced.

    A similar argument holds for a for loop. However when I start nesting:-

    if (foo)
        if (bar)
            snafu()
    

    Now I'm running into trouble, it looks like a block of statements. Personally I would only skip the use of braces for one level only any deeper an I'd make the outer code use braces:-

    if (foo) {
       if (bar)
           snafu()
    }
    

    As I'm typing this I've seen the answers jump from 1 to 17, clearly this going to be an emotive question (I suggest you add subjective to the tag list (my ability to do this has gone missing whats up with that?)).

    The most important thing is to have agreement in the team as to if and how its acceptable and stick with it.

    share|improve this answer
    1  
    Try if (foo && bar) snafu() . C# supports short-circuiting :) –  Brian Jun 19 '09 at 20:00

    It is a tradeof, shorter code (better readable) versus more secure code (less error prone).

    My 2 cents:

    1. There is a reason for this rule. It has been developed by countless programmers through long working hours, stretching into the night or next morning, trying to fix a bug that was caused by a little oversight.
    2. You have t decide for yourself if the tradeof is worth it.
    3. In my experience it is, I am one of those countless programmers who was working into the night to find the cause for a nasty bug. The cause was me being lazy.
    share|improve this answer
    1  
    The countless programmers in point 1, are they industry leaders that we should be following, or the LCD type of programmer? –  Bob Dec 11 '08 at 16:15

    Ok it has always seemed to me that this is more of personal preference to me. I have noticed however for readability it is better to have { } then to not have them. I have notice using ReSharper that ReSharper tends to delete them and do most of you if statements like this

    if(this == yes)
          DoSomething();
    

    But for readability sake I always do

    if(this == yes)
    {
     DoSomething();
    }
    

    Although with only one line of code in the "if" statement readability isnt really different but if you put 20-30 lines of code in one if statement then it is easier to read with the {} there and it leaves less room for error and bugs in your code.

    share|improve this answer

    I am always perplex when I see "this style saves space".
    Since I rarely, if ever, print out code, gain of space has no obvious advantage for me: saving some bytes on disk doesn't worth it, and I don't pay for space taken on screen.
    Some people find compact code more readable, I won't argue no this (highly subjective), but as amateur artist and typograph, I highly value whitespace use...

    I won't repeat the above arguments, but I will add, I think, consistency: I dislike code like

    if (foo)
    {
      // Lot of code
    }
    else
      DoStuff();
    

    Having said that, sometime I indulge in no braces: in guard conditions, when I do early exit:

    if (somethingBadHappened)
      return;
    

    To summarize, I think adding (almost) systematically braces around significant code improves readability (code "breathes", isn't cramped), consistency, and might avoid some stupid mistakes (yes, this kind of error is obvious, but coder is human (in general), can be tired, newbie, under stress...).

    I have made a Lua macro for SciTE to add these braces around any block of code or current line, with one keystroke and correct indentation: it really costs nothing for me.

    Now, I won't sue you if you chose to omit these braces. As others point out, one option or the other can be set in coding rules. To each their owns.

    share|improve this answer
    1  
    "I don't pay for space taken on screen." You do pay for it by not being able to see other code simultaneously. –  recursive Dec 11 '08 at 16:52

    On the one hand, I leave the braces out for a single statement. On the other hand, I check all C code with PC-Lint (http://www.gimpel.com/), which flags two or more indented lines following an if() statement as "suspicious indentation".

    By the way, putting single statements on the same line as the if() looks like a good idea.

    share|improve this answer

    I always use curly braces except on the inner most statement, assuming the inner most statement is a single-liner. So my code looks like:

    for (int i=0; i<10; i++) 
    {
        for (int x=0; x<20; x++) 
        {
            if (someBoolValue)
                DoThis(x,y);
        }
    }
    

    The other exception is of course, stacked using statements.

    There's absolutely no sense in writing

    using (Stream x = File.Open(...)) 
    {
        using (Stream y = File.Create(...)) 
        {
            ...
        }
    }
    

    when you can write

    using (Stream x = File.Open(...))
    using (Stream y = File.Create(...)) 
    {
        ....
    }
    
    share|improve this answer

    I like the more compact formatting too. This is why I'm constantly hitting Ctrl+K, Ctrl+D to reformat in Visual Studio. I just wish I could make it do this for me after every keypress.

    share|improve this answer

    Because StyleCop says so.

    share|improve this answer

    If you feel "sometimes" it is useful to have braces, you should aways add braces to be consistant. Programs should be written to be read by people not computers. I prefer braces like:

    if (mybool)
    {
      doMyStuff();
    }
    else
    {
      doMyOtherStuff();
      checkStuff();
    }
    

    and NOT like

    if (mybool) {
      doMyStuff();
    }
    else {
      doMyOtherStuff();
      checkStuff();
    }
    

    and not like

       if (mybool)
         doMyStuff(); 
       else 
       {  
         doMyOtherStuff();
         checkStuff(); 
       }
    
    share|improve this answer
    1  
    I prefer your second example. For me it's less about whether the specific curly brace characters match up, & about a conceptual start-matches-end thing. –  Wick Jan 17 '11 at 16:14

    On other thought, if you are removing/not using braces to save lines, you need to refactor the code.

    share|improve this answer

    Have you thought about exploring this option for single line if else statement:

    (!a) ? Foo() : Bar();
    
    share|improve this answer
    3  
    That's distasteful to some because the ternary operator is intended to calculate values. The flow control in your example is a side effect. –  recursive Dec 11 '08 at 16:51

    AFAIR curly braces are always a scope, so for that it is good to use them everytime.

    Without the braces:

    if(DoSomething)
        MyClass myClass = new MyClass();
    
    myClass.DoAnythingElse();
    

    This will compile, but lead to null references easily. (C# compiler does not compile this, good thing!)

    Whereas this way:

    if(doSomething)
    {
        MyClass myClass = new MyClass();
    }
    
    myClass.DoAnythingElse();
    

    won't even compile.

    It is far better than minize Exceptions at compiletime already, than finding them at runtime.

    share|improve this answer
    1  
    Your first example will not compile, this is the compile error you will recieve: Embedded statement cannot be a declaration or labeled statement –  mockobject Dec 11 '08 at 16:09

    I prefer braces in most situations. Often you'll come back to the code to add more lines of code and you'll have to add them anyway.

    share|improve this answer

    There's a lot of good answers here about why you shouldn't -- and I'm on the side that agrees that you shouldn't omit braces.

    If you're looking for more terse code, I'd actually work with a ternary statement. They provide compactness with a certain amount of unambiguity and are more resistant to accidents.

    The problem with omitting braces, as mentioned, is the likelihood of mistakes after the fact. Most programmers will agree that they can read:

    if( foo )
        bar();
    

    The problem comes when people come and change the statement and don't pay attention. At the last place I worked, there was actually a problem that arose from someone modifying the statement or commenting out a line. A coding standard was put in place to make sure bugs like that never happened again.

    As someone else said, programmer time is the expensive bit. Like commenting your code, it's often faster to just leave out bits because they're optional, but easily maintainable code often relies on those 'optional' things.

    Lastly, some people have mentioned that modern editors and IDEs should auto-indent and show you scope automatically. My answer is to not use such things as a crutch. There are times when you're looking at code out of a source repository or over a remote connection or even in an email -- these are the realities of development. You may not have an IDE or advanced editor to show you what you're doing wrong. Always write your code so that it's understandable no matter what you load it in.

    share|improve this answer

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