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I have the name of a function in JavaScript as a string. How do I convert that into a function pointer so I can call it later?

Depending on the circumstances, I may need to pass various arguments into the method too.

Some of the functions may take the form of namespace.namespace.function(args[...]).

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13 Answers 13

up vote 488 down vote accepted

Don't use eval unless you absolutely, positively have no other choice.

As has been mentioned, using something like this would be the best way to do it:

window["functionName"](arguments);

That, however, will not work with a namespace'd function:

window["My.Namespace.functionName"](arguments); // fail

This is how you would do that:

window["My"]["Namespace"]["functionName"](arguments); // succeeds

In order to make that easier and provide some flexibility, here is a convenience function:

function executeFunctionByName(functionName, context /*, args */) {
  var args = [].slice.call(arguments).splice(2);
  var namespaces = functionName.split(".");
  var func = namespaces.pop();
  for(var i = 0; i < namespaces.length; i++) {
    context = context[namespaces[i]];
  }
  return context[func].apply(this, args);
}

You would call it like so:

executeFunctionByName("My.Namespace.functionName", window, arguments);

Note, you can pass in whatever context you want, so this would do the same as above:

executeFunctionByName("Namespace.functionName", My, arguments);
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3  
you know you don't need the whole "func" construct? "context.apply" alone is fine –  annakata Dec 11 '08 at 16:36
4  
Sure, I know that - but the way I wrote the function provides some clarity for those reading it that may not completely grok what is happening. I wrote this function realizing people reading it may need some help. I will provide an alternate though, since you asked... –  Jason Bunting Dec 11 '08 at 16:50
14  
Scratch that - the code is clear enough and those that know, know. If you are like me, and know what you are doing, you can just make such changes on your own if you used this code. Stack Overflow is for educating others, and I think my code is easier for the novice to understand. Thanks though! –  Jason Bunting Dec 11 '08 at 17:21
1  
Is there a situation when window["funcName"] would return undefined? That is the problem I'm having at the moment. The calling code and the function are defined in two separate js files. I tried adding them to the same file but that made no difference. –  codemonkey Mar 16 '10 at 11:19
3  
I think there's a problem here. When you call My.Namespace.functionName(), this will refer to the My.Namespace object. But when you call executeFunctionByName("My.Namespace.functionName", window), there's no way to get this to refer to the same thing. Maybe it should use the last namespace as the scope, or window if there are no namespaces. Or you could allow the user to specify the scope as an argument. –  JW. Jul 6 '11 at 23:08

Just thought I'd post a slightly altered version of Jason Bunting's very helpful function. First, I have simplified the first statement by supplying a second parameter to slice(). The original version was working fine in all browsers except IE. Secondly, I have replaced this with context in the return statement; otherwise, this was always pointing to window when the target function was being executed.

function executeFunctionByName(functionName, context /*, args */) {
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 2);
    var namespaces = functionName.split(".");
    var func = namespaces.pop();
    for (var i = 0; i < namespaces.length; i++) {
        context = context[namespaces[i]];
    }
    return context[func].apply(context, args);
}
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The answer to this other question shows you how to do that: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/39960/javascript-locals

Basically, you can say

window["foo"](arg1, arg2);

or as many others have suggested, you can just use eval:

eval(fname)(arg1, arg2);

although this is extremely unsafe unless you're absolutely sure about what you're eval-ing.

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2  
the first form is far preferable –  annakata Dec 11 '08 at 15:54
6  
Only use eval as a last resort, when all else fails. –  Jason Bunting Dec 11 '08 at 15:58
1  
It is...but will it work with functions like this: x.y.z(args)? –  Kieron Dec 11 '08 at 15:58
    
@keiron: yes. see my answer below –  annakata Dec 11 '08 at 16:02

Two things:

  • avoid eval, it's terribly dangerous and slow

  • secondly it doesn't matter where your function exists, "global" -ness is irrelevant. x.y.foo() can be enabled through x.y['foo']() or x['y']['foo']() or even window['x']['y']['foo'](). You can chain indefinitely like this.

I <3 JS

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but you can't do window['x.y.z']() to call x.y.z() –  nickf Dec 11 '08 at 16:11
1  
no, nickf, you can't do that. My answer provides a generic solution... –  Jason Bunting Dec 11 '08 at 16:16

You just need convert your string to a pointer by window[<method name>]. example:

var function_name = "string";
function_name = window[function_name];

and now you can use it like a pointer.

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Could you not just do this:

var codeToExecute = "My.Namespace.functionName()";
var tmpFunc = new Function(codeToExecute);
tmpFunc();

You can also execute any other JavaScript using this method.

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This worked for me. Thanks. –  lionheart Mar 26 at 7:20

All the answers assume that the functions can be accessed through global scope (aka window). However, the OP did not make this assumption.

If the functions live in a local scope (aka closure) and are not referenced by some other local object, bad luck: You have to use eval() AFAIK, see dynamically call local function in javascript

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Dude (or dudette), thank you so much for pointing that out! I thought I was going crazy for a second. –  Funktron Mar 16 at 3:13

If you want to call a function of an object instead of a global function with window["functionName"]. You can do it like;

var myObject=new Object();
myObject["functionName"](arguments);

Example:

var now=new Date();
now["getFullYear"]()
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There too some very helpful way.

http://devlicio.us/blogs/sergio_pereira/archive/2009/02/09/javascript-5-ways-to-call-a-function.aspx

var arrayMaker = {  
    someProperty: 'some value here',  
    make: function (arg1, arg2) {  
        return [ this, arg1, arg2 ];  
    },
    execute: function_name
};
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One more detail on Jason and Alex's posts. I found it helpful to add a default value to context. Just put context = context == undefined? window:context; at the beginning of the function. You can change window to whatever your preferred context is, and then you won't need to pass in the same variable each time you call this in your default context.

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Just curious, is the Jquery plugin and namespace guide just what you need?

http://docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Authoring#Namespacing

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This is working for me.

var command = "Add";
var tempFunction = new Function("Arg1","Arg2", "window." + command + "(Arg1,Arg2)");
tempFunction(x,y);
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To add to Jason Bunting's answer, if you're using nodejs or something (and this works in dom js, too), you could use this instead of window (and remember: eval is evil:

this['fun'+'ctionName']();
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