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I am trying to access the element asd7 inside the innermost structure, here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
 struct asd
 {
  int asd;
  struct asd1
  {
   int asd1;
   struct asd6
   {
    int asd7;
   }asd6;
  }asd1;
 }asd;
 int asd10;
 int asd11;
 struct asd *ptr1;
 struct asd1 *ptr2;
 struct asd6 *ptr3;
 asd.asd1.asd6.asd7=10; 
 printf("%d\n",asd.asd1.asd6.asd7);

}

The code is compiling but I am unable to run it - I am getting a segmentation fault. Any help would be great.

Thanks

The output is:

10

Exited: ExitFailure 3
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1  
Please post the complete program. (A #include will not compile.) There is otherwise nothing specifically wrong with the code as-is. –  Jim Buck Aug 30 '10 at 5:00
    
With a correct #include, it works here codepad.org/18Vca84m. –  Praveen S Aug 30 '10 at 5:09
    
Bods, the naked include was the effect of using 'pre' tags instead of code indent. I fixed that and also moved the output across to here. –  paxdiablo Aug 30 '10 at 5:42
1  
I'm not convinced my answer is correct - I've just noticed the exit failure of 3 is from a different user than the OP (who stated segfault). But it doesn't generate a segfault on gcc, it's perfectly valid. @Manoj, can you post the actual output here (and try it with a return 0; just in case). Also which compiler are you using? –  paxdiablo Aug 30 '10 at 5:49

1 Answer 1

There's nothing wrong with your code that a simple return 0; at the end wouldn't fix :-)

Without:

pax> cat qq.c ; gcc -o qq qq.c ; ./qq ; echo rc=$?

#include <stdio.h>
int main (void) {
    struct asd {
        int asd;
        struct asd1 {
            int asd1;
            struct asd6 {
                int asd7;
            } asd6;
        } asd1;
    } asd;
    asd.asd1.asd6.asd7=10;
    printf("%d\n",asd.asd1.asd6.asd7);
    //return 0;
}

10
rc=3

With:

pax> cat qq.c ; gcc -o qq qq.c ; ./qq ; echo rc=$?

#include <stdio.h>
int main (void) {
    struct asd {
        int asd;
        struct asd1 {
            int asd1;
            struct asd6 {
                int asd7;
            } asd6;
        } asd1;
    } asd;
    asd.asd1.asd6.asd7=10;
    printf("%d\n",asd.asd1.asd6.asd7);
    return 0;
}

10
rc=0

The other alternative is to switch to a C99 compiler (or mode). The C99 standard states, in part (paraphrased):

If the return type of the main function is a type compatible with int, a return from the initial call to the main function is equivalent to calling the exit function with the value returned by the main function as its argument: reaching the } that terminates the main function returns a value of 0.

(my italics).

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1  
This is a completely ridiculous diversion, but I usually do gcc -o qq qq.c && ./qq && ... — because otherwise if it doesn't compile, you end up running the last version that did instead :) –  detly Aug 30 '10 at 6:03

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