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Is there a better way to write code like this:

if (var == "first case" or var == "second case" or var == "third case" or ...)

In Python I can write:

if var in ("first case", "second case", "third case", ...)

which also gives me the opportunity to easily pass the list of good options:

good_values = "first case", "second case", "third case"
if var in good_values

This is just an example: the type of var may be different from a string, but I am only interested in alternative (or) comparisons (==). var may be non-const, while the list of options is known at compile time.

Pro bonus:

  • laziness of or
  • compile time loop unrolling
  • easy to extend to other operators than ==
share|improve this question
4  
Well there is std::any_of but it doesn't work on "literal" lists like that. So no there's no straight conversion from the Python expression to a similar C++ expression. Shouldn't be to hard to make a templated in function using std::any_of and std::initializer_list. – Joachim Pileborg Mar 14 at 9:52
1  
you can write a template function like a template<typename T>bool eq(T what, T a, T b, T c){ return what == a || what == b || what == c; } and use it: if(eq(var, "first", "second", "third")) – nikniknik2016 Mar 14 at 9:53
    
@Ruggero Turra instead of going for a new keywords like any_of, better you can prefer for() loop it will make the program readable easily. – Let Us Embed Mar 14 at 14:17
5  
Compact code is not legible code. "Compactness" is not a virtue in coding. – Almo Mar 14 at 14:18
6  
@Almo: I couldn't disagree more. Naturally, there are things so terse (I'm looking at you, regex) that they aren't considered legible by mere mortals but, all other things being equal, less code is always better than more. – Robert Harvey Mar 15 at 0:50

if you want to expand it compile time you can use something like this

template<class T1, class T2>
bool isin(T1&& t1, T2&& t2) {
   return t1 == t2;
}

template<class T1, class T2, class... Ts>
bool isin(T1&& t1 , T2&& t2, T2&&... ts) {
   return t1 == t2 || isin(t1, ts...);
}

std::string my_var = ...; // somewhere in the code
...
bool b = isin(my_var, "fun", "gun", "hun");

I did not test it actually, and the idea comes from Alexandrescu's 'Variadic templates are funadic' talk. So for the details (and proper implementation) watch that.

share|improve this answer
    
this requires to list the options one by one. Is there a way to write something like isin(my_var, {"fun", "gun", "hun"}) or isin(my_vary, options_vector) – Ruggero Turra Mar 14 at 10:29
    
first option should be possible, but expanding the initializer_list compile time... not worth the effort really. For the second option I would rather use Kerrek answer, or maybe wrapped that into a more convenient interface like the one you asked for. Because that already sounds more like a runtime stuff. – Slava Mar 14 at 10:41
    
the list of options is known at compile time – Ruggero Turra Mar 14 at 10:42
1  
@RuggeroTurra: the (untested) code actually answers your question, for checking whether there is an entry in a container, there is std::find() or more specialized functions (binary_search, lower_bound, count,...) – stefaanv Mar 14 at 10:49
    
@stefaanv I kind of see the good use cases for what Ruggero requests. But unpacking initializer_list compile time is not trivial, I will try it later... and hopefully update. – Slava Mar 14 at 10:59

The any_of algorithm could work reasonably well here:

#include <algorithm>
#include <initializer_list>

auto tokens = { "abc", "def", "ghi" };

bool b = std::any_of(tokens.begin(), tokens.end(),
                     [&var](const char * s) { return s == var; });

(You may wish to constrain the scope of tokens to the minimal required context.)

Or you create a wrapper template:

#include <algorithm>
#include <initializer_list>
#include <utility>

template <typename T, typename F>
bool any_of_c(const std::initializer_list<T> & il, F && f)
{
    return std::any_of(il.begin(), il.end(), std::forward<F>(f));
}

Usage:

bool b = any_of_c({"abc", "def", "ghi"},
                  [&var](const char * s) { return s == var; });
share|improve this answer
8  
Be careful! Your statement s == val is comparing pointers! You probably want to use std::strcmp or one of its relatives. – Joshua Green Mar 14 at 10:16
1  
@JoshuaGreen: val is an std::string_view of course :-) (Coming to think of it, the initializer list should be a list of string views, which would settle the problem once and for all.) Anyway, that's what the OP asked for. I assume he knows the semantics of his comparisons. – Kerrek SB Mar 14 at 10:23
4  
@Lundin: Raw code is a burden on the reader. It forces the reader to read your loop body. Giving a name to the concept and making a named call allows the reader to skip over the line "knowing what you mean", and trust the tested library implementation to have implemented the intention correctly. At a fundamental level, every system is limited by its growing complexity; named abstractions (algorithms) are one of the prime strategies for reducing complexity. – Kerrek SB Mar 14 at 10:51
2  
@Lundin: It's not about competence. It's about breaking down complexity. The reader has better things to do than look at your loop. – Kerrek SB Mar 14 at 11:37
3  
@Lundin It's not so much "how hard is it to understand a for loop", rather "how easy is it to spot subtle errors_". E.g. off-by-1 errors at begin/end (easy if you have 1-based rather than more common 0-based array); and in more complex loop bodies there can be errors in terms of side-effects or error handling. Even though for loops are trivial, the idea behind generic iteration is to eliminate certain common errors. Granted gains are minimal in trivial examples, and you wouldn't want to lose them by introducing other errors. But foreach, ifany, ifall, ifnone are simple, powerful concepts. – Craig Young Mar 15 at 0:27

Alrighty then, you want Radical Language Modification. Specifically, you want to create your own operator. Ready?

Syntax

I'm going to amend the syntax to use a C and C++-styled list:

if (x in {x0, ...}) ...

Additionally, we'll let our new in operator apply to any container for which begin() and end() are defined:

if (x in my_vector) ...

There is one caveat: it is not a true operator and so it must always be parenthesized as it's own expression:

bool ok = (x in my_array);

my_function( (x in some_sequence) );

The code

The first thing to be aware is that RLM often requires some macro and operator abuse. Fortunately, for a simple membership predicate, the abuse is actually not that bad.

#ifndef DUTHOMHAS_IN_OPERATOR_HPP
#define DUTHOMHAS_IN_OPERATOR_HPP

#include <algorithm>
#include <initializer_list>
#include <iterator>
#include <type_traits>
#include <vector>

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// The 'in' operator is magically defined to operate on any container you give it
#define in , in_container() =

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// The reverse-argument membership predicate is defined as the lowest-precedence 
// operator available. And conveniently, it will not likely collide with anything.
template <typename T, typename Container>
typename std::enable_if <!std::is_same <Container, T> ::value, bool> ::type
operator , ( const T& x, const Container& xs )
{
  using std::begin;
  using std::end;
  return std::find( begin(xs), end(xs), x ) != end(xs);
}

template <typename T, typename Container>
typename std::enable_if <std::is_same <Container, T> ::value, bool> ::type
operator , ( const T& x, const Container& y )
{
  return x == y;
}

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// This thunk is used to accept any type of container without need for 
// special syntax when used.
struct in_container
{
  template <typename Container>
  const Container& operator = ( const Container& container )
  {
    return container;
  }

  template <typename T>
  std::vector <T> operator = ( std::initializer_list <T> xs )
  {
    return std::vector <T> ( xs );
  }
};

#endif

Usage

Great! Now we can use it in all the ways you would expect an in operator to be useful. According to your particular interest, see example 3:

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

void f( const string& s, const vector <string> & ss ) { cout << "nope\n\n"; }
void f( bool b ) { cout << "fooey!\n\n"; }

int main()
{
  cout << 
    "I understand three primes by digit or by name.\n"
    "Type \"q\" to \"quit\".\n\n";

  while (true)
  {
    string s;
    cout << "s? ";
    getline( cin, s );

    // Example 1: arrays 
    const char* quits[] = { "quit", "q" };
    if (s in quits) 
      break;

    // Example 2: vectors
    vector <string> digits { "2", "3", "5" };
    if (s in digits)
    {
      cout << "a prime digit\n\n";
      continue;
    }

    // Example 3: literals
    if (s in {"two", "three", "five"})
    {
      cout << "a prime name!\n\n";
      continue;
    }

    // Example 4: sets
    set <const char*> favorites{ "7", "seven" };
    if (s in favorites)
    {
      cout << "a favorite prime!\n\n";
      continue;
    }

    // Example 5: sets, part deux
    if (s in set <string> { "TWO", "THREE", "FIVE", "SEVEN" })
    {
      cout << "(ouch! don't shout!)\n\n";
      continue;
    }

    // Example 6: operator weirdness
    if (s[0] in string("014") + "689")
    {
      cout << "not prime\n\n";
      continue;
    }

    // Example 7: argument lists unaffected    
    f( s, digits );
  }
  cout << "bye\n";
}

Potential improvements

There are always things that can be done to improve the code for your specific purposes. You can add a ni (not-in) operator (Add a new thunk container type). You can wrap the thunk containers in a namespace (a good idea). You can specialize on things like std::set to use the .count() member function instead of the O(n) search. Etc.

Your other concerns

  • const vs mutable : not an issue; both are usable with the operator
  • laziness of or : Technically, or is not lazy, it is short-circuited. The std::find() algorithm also short-circuits in the same way.
  • compile time loop unrolling : not really applicable here. Your original code did not use loops; while std::find() does, any loop unrolling that may occur is up to the compiler.
  • easy to extend to operators other than == : That actually is a separate issue; you are no longer looking at a simple membership predicate, but are now considering a functional fold-filter. It is entirely possible to create an algorithm that does that, but the Standard Library provides the any_of() function, which does exactly that. (It's just not as pretty as our RLM 'in' operator. That said, any C++ programmer will understand it easily. Such answers have already been proffered here.)

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

First, I recommend using a for loop, which is both the easiest and most readable solution:

for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
   if (var == eq[i]) {
      // if true
      break;
   }
}

However, some other methods also available, e.g., std::all_of, std::any_of, std::none_of (in #include <algorithm>).

Let us look at the simple example program which contains all the above keywords

#include <vector>
#include <numeric>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v(10, 2);
    std::partial_sum(v.cbegin(), v.cend(), v.begin());
    std::cout << "Among the numbers: ";
    std::copy(v.cbegin(), v.cend(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
    std::cout << '\\n';

    if (std::all_of(v.cbegin(), v.cend(), [](int i){ return i % 2 == 0; })) 
    {
        std::cout << "All numbers are even\\n";
    }
    if (std::none_of(v.cbegin(), v.cend(), std::bind(std::modulus<int>(),
                                  std::placeholders::_1, 2))) 
    {
        std::cout << "None of them are odd\\n";
    }
    struct DivisibleBy
    {
        const int d;
        DivisibleBy(int n) : d(n) {}
        bool operator()(int n) const { return n % d == 0; }
    };

    if (std::any_of(v.cbegin(), v.cend(), DivisibleBy(7))) 
    {
        std::cout << "At least one number is divisible by 7\\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I guess you should put a break in the second solution – Ruggero Turra Mar 14 at 10:06
    
@RuggeroTurra yeah tnks it will save the time – Let Us Embed Mar 14 at 10:07
    
no, it is not just to save time – Ruggero Turra Mar 14 at 10:08
4  
The for loop is both the fastest and most readable version, so there shouldn't be a reason to use anything else. – Lundin Mar 14 at 10:12
1  
Yes @Lundin i will also prefer the for loop version wich is realy easy to program – Let Us Embed Mar 14 at 12:41

You may use std::set to test if var belongs to it. (Compile with c++11 enabled)

#include <iostream>
#include <set>

int main()
{
    std::string el = "abc";

    if (std::set<std::string>({"abc", "def", "ghi"}).count(el))
        std::cout << "abc belongs to {\"abc\", \"def\", \"ghi\"}" << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

The advantage is that std::set<std::string>::count works in O(log(n)) time (where is n is number of strings to test) comparing to non compact if witch is O(n) in general. The disadvantage is that construction of the set takes O(n*log(n)). So, construct it once, like:

static std::set<std::string> the_set = {"abc", "def", "ghi"};

But, IMO it would be better to leave the condition as is, unless it contains more than 10 strings to check. The performance advantages of using std::set for such a test appears only for big n. Also, simple non compact if is easier to read for average c++ developer.

share|improve this answer

The closest thing would be something like:

template <class K, class U, class = decltype(std::declval<K>() == std::declval<U>())>
bool in(K&& key, std::initializer_list<U> vals)
{
    return std::find(vals.begin(), vals.end(), key) != vals.end();
}

We need to take an argument of type initializer_list<U> so that we can pass in a braced-init-list like {a,b,c}. This copies the elements, but presumably we're going doing this because we're providing literals so probably not a big deal.

We can use that like so:

std::string var = "hi";    
bool b = in(var, {"abc", "def", "ghi", "hi"});
std::cout << b << std::endl; // true
share|improve this answer

If you have access to C++14 (not sure if this works with C++11) you could write something like this:

template <typename T, typename L = std::initializer_list<T>>
constexpr bool is_one_of(const T& value, const L& list)
{
    return std::any_of(std::begin(list), std::end(list), [&value](const T& element) { return element == value; });
};

A call would look like this:

std::string test_case = ...;
if (is_one_of<std::string>(test_case, { "first case", "second case", "third case" })) {...}

or like this

std::string test_case = ...;
std::vector<std::string> allowedCases{ "first case", "second case", "third case" };
if (is_one_of<std::string>(test_case, allowedCases)) {...}

If you don't like to "wrap" the allowed cases into a list type you can also write a little helper function like this:

template <typename T, typename...L>
constexpr bool is_one_of(const T& value, const T& first, const L&... next) //First is used to be distinct
{
    return is_one_of(value, std::initializer_list<T>{first, next...});
};

This will allow you to call it like this:

std::string test_case = ...;
if (is_one_of<std::string>(test_case, "first case", "second case", "third case" )) {...}

Complete example on Coliru

share|improve this answer

Worth noting that in most Java and C++ code I've seen, listing 3 or so conditionals out is the accepted practice. It's certainly more readable than "clever" solutions. If this happens so often it's a major drag, that's a design smell anyway and a templated or polymorphic approach would probably help avoid this.

So my answer is the "null" operation. Just keep doing the more verbose thing, it's most accepted.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, but to refactor is out of my control. I just need a syntactic sugar. – Ruggero Turra Mar 14 at 18:15

You could use a switch case. Instead of having a list of separate cases you could have :

include

using namespace std;

int main () { char grade = 'B';

switch(grade)
{
case 'A' :
case 'B' :
case 'C' :
    cout << "Well done" << endl;
    break;
case 'D' :
    cout << "You passed" << endl;
    break;
case 'F' :
    cout << "Better try again" << endl;
    break;

default :
    cout << "Invalid grade" << endl;

}

cout << "Your grade is " << grade << endl;

return 0;

}

So you can group your results together: A, B and C will output "well done". I took this example from Tutorials Point: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/cplusplus/cpp_switch_statement.htm

share|improve this answer
    
definitevely not better than a list of ifs – Ruggero Turra Apr 5 at 11:46
    
Apparently that's debatable: [link] (stackoverflow.com/questions/97987/…) and here: lnk – Mike Cave Apr 13 at 9:40
    
I asked for a more compact version, not faster – Ruggero Turra Apr 13 at 9:52
    
Um.. you asked for >"Is there a better way to write code like this: " ? Which I suppose was quite an open question. Apologies if I misunderstood you :-) – Mike Cave Apr 13 at 10:02

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