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C#: what is the difference between i++ and ++i?

I see this operator (++) very often. I know what it does ultimately, but it seems like there's some rules I don't understand. For example, it seems to matter if you put it before or after the variable you're using it on. Can someone explain this?

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marked as duplicate by Charles Bailey, Fredrik Mörk, leppie, Binary Worrier, Brann Aug 30 '10 at 8:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The statement

x++;

is exactly equivalent to

x = x + 1;

except that x is evaluated only once (which makes a difference if it is an expression involving property getters).

The difference between the following two:

DoSomething(x++);   // notice x first, then ++
DoSomething(++x);   // notice ++ first, then x

Is that in the first one, the method DoSomething will see the previous value of x before it was incremented. In the second one, it will see the new (incremented) value.

For more information, see C# Operators on MSDN.

It is possible to declare a custom ++ operator for your own classes, in which case the operator can do something different. If you want to define your own ++ operator, see Operator Overloading Tutorial on MSDN.

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"except that x is evaluated only once" - sorry, you're wrong there. x++ and x = x + 1 are actually completely equivalent. Note that in the latter case, x is evaluated only once as well. It is then set, which also happens with x++. (my comment is, of course, referring to using the operator as a statement, not as part of another call, in which case function(x++) and function(x = x + 1), obviously, do not behave equally) – Michael Aug 30 '10 at 9:11
    
@Michael: You misunderstood what I mean. If you write myObj.SomeProperty.SomeValue++, then the SomeProperty getter is called only once, but if you write myObj.SomeProperty.SomeValue = myObj.SomeProperty.SomeValue + 1, then it is called twice. – Timwi Aug 30 '10 at 9:34
    
In this case, you're right, the SomeProperty getter is called twice :-) Just wanted to point out that the SomeValue getter would be called only once. Also a compiler might optimize away the double getter-calling, I think? But this is just a suspicion. – Michael Aug 30 '10 at 9:59
1  
@Michael: Any compiler that would optimise it away would have a bug. The C# specification is very clear and unambiguous about the expected side-effects. This is not C++ after all :) – Timwi Aug 30 '10 at 10:13
2  
It is not true that x++ and x = x + 1 are exactly the same. Don't believe me? Try it. byte x = 0; x++; vs byte x = 0; x = x + 1; gives different results because one of them doesn't even compile. – Eric Lippert Aug 30 '10 at 14:16

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/36x43w8w(v=VS.80).aspx

The increment operator (++) increments its operand by 1. The increment operator can appear before or after its operand:

The first form is a prefix increment operation. The result of the operation is the value of the operand after it has been incremented.

The second form is a postfix increment operation. The result of the operation is the value of the operand before it has been incremented.

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If you put the ++ operator before the variable, it is incremented first. If you put the ++ operator after the variable, it is incremented after.

For example(C#):

int x = 0;
Console.WriteLine("x is {0}", x++); // Prints x is 0

int y = 0;
Console.WriteLine("y is {0}", ++y); // Prints y is 1

Hope this cleared it up.

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3  
Though this is a common answer to this question, it is in fact wrong. The time when the increment happens does not change depending on whether the operator is prefix or postfix. What changes is which temporary value computed during the increment is chosen as the result of the operator. Contrast this answer, which states that the difference is when the side effect happens with Michael's answer, that correctly states that the difference is which value is returned. This is a subtle but important difference. – Eric Lippert Aug 30 '10 at 14:17
    
@Eric - I didn't know about that :). Thanks for explaining! – Kevin Aug 30 '10 at 14:49

well if you put it like

variable++

It first uses the variable and the increments it (+1) On the otherhand if you

++variable

It first increments the variable and then uses it

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This answer is also not correct. The last statement incorrectly implies that the result is the value of the variable after incrementing when in fact the result is the value assigned to the variable. The variable is not read a second time. – Eric Lippert Aug 30 '10 at 14:21
    
@Eric Lippert You have an eye for detail there, i did not know that. – andrei Aug 30 '10 at 20:19

Another way to see it... here are two functions that do the same as prefix/postfix ++. This illustrates that prefix is, in theory, faster, because no temporary variable is needed to store the "previous" value:

// same as x ++;
int PostfixIncrement(ref int x)
{
    int y = x;
    x = x + 1;
    return y;
}

// same as ++ x;
int PrefixIncrement(ref int x)
{
    x = x + 1;
    return x;
}
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If you put the ++ operator before the variable, it is incremented first. If you put the ++ operator after the variable, it is incremented after.

For example(C#):

int x = 0; Console.WriteLine("x is {0}", x++); // Prints x is 0

int y = 0; Console.WriteLine("y is {0}", ++y); // Prints y is 1

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4  
No, i=i++ means you increment first and then assign the old value back, making the operation useless. i=++i has the same effect as simply ++i. – Timwi Aug 30 '10 at 7:49
1  
Yeah, was about to write the same. i=i++ and similar examples are very bad for the explanation, because its more confusing the clarifying. – Stefan Steinegger Aug 30 '10 at 7:57
    
You shouldn't be copy-pasting answers of others just like that. – Kevin Aug 30 '10 at 16:04

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