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Currently I use this function, based on JCL code, which works fine:

function IsDirectoryWriteable(const AName: string): Boolean;
var
  FileName: PWideChar;
  H: THandle;
begin
  FileName := PWideChar(IncludeTrailingPathDelimiter(AName) + 'chk.tmp');

  H := CreateFile(FileName, GENERIC_READ or GENERIC_WRITE, 0, nil,
    CREATE_NEW, FILE_ATTRIBUTE_TEMPORARY or FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE, 0);

  Result := H <> INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;

  DeleteFile(FileName);
end;

Is there anything I could improve with the flags? Can the test be done without actually creating a file? Or is this functionality even already available in one of the RTL or Jedi libraries?

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3  
Doesn't the code work for you? Is there something about this approach you do not like? It is indeed a very simple (the simplest?) way of testing for directory write access. Although I have never worked much with Windows security, I guess an alternative approach is to use the GetFileSecurity function. –  Andreas Rejbrand Aug 30 '10 at 10:01
2  
I've never been a fan of functions like this. What are you going to do based on whether or not the directory is writable? Why don't you just try to do it, and if it fails then handle it gracefully. –  Luke Aug 30 '10 at 15:17
1  
My point is that there is not really any need for generic functions like this. Instead you should just try to write whatever files you need to, and if something fails then do whatever you would do if this function returned false. For instance, what if the files you need to write to are locked by another process? This function won't catch things like that. –  Luke Aug 30 '10 at 17:13
1  
@Luke: when a createfile fails, it can be useful to log extra information about the environment. Part of that could be whether the destination folder was found and writeable. Another part could be (something we do regularly in our logs) to list all processes having handles to the file we cannot access... So this function does have its merits in and of it self. Also, we often use it after write failure to detect a read-only folder and attempt to change it to a writeable one so we can retry the write. Yes, we could blindly try to make it writeable, but our logs are now much more informative. –  Marjan Venema Aug 30 '10 at 19:50
2  
@Luke: here's a possible scenario. An application that can be used as "portable", i.e. run from a removable drive. The first thing I'd want to do is check if I can write changed data and configuration. If for whatever reason I'm running from a CD-ROM, say, or a write-protected pendrive, then I would set a flag to prevent any attempts at write operations, because in this case it is not an error or cause for concern. Otherwise the user could be subjected to a whole lot of "access denied" error messages and be justifiably annoyed. –  moodforaday Aug 30 '10 at 22:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Actually writing to the directory is the simpliest way to determine if the directory is writable. There are too many security options available to check individually, and even then you might miss something.

You also need to close the opened handle before calling DeleteFile(). Which you do not need to do anyway since you are using the FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE flag.

BTW, there is a small bug in your code. You are creating a temporary String and assigning it to a PWideChar, but the String goes out of scope, freeing the memory, before the PWideChar is actually used. Your FileName variable should be a String instead of a PWideChar. Do the type-cast when calling CreateFile(), not before.

Try this:

function IsDirectoryWriteable(const AName: string): Boolean; 
var 
  FileName: String; 
  H: THandle; 
begin 
  FileName := IncludeTrailingPathDelimiter(AName) + 'chk.tmp'; 
  H := CreateFile(PChar(FileName), GENERIC_READ or GENERIC_WRITE, 0, nil, 
    CREATE_NEW, FILE_ATTRIBUTE_TEMPORARY or FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE, 0); 
  Result := H <> INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE; 
  if Result then CloseHandle(H);
end; 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 (Personally I would use HFILE rather than THandle, but of course this is only a matter of taste.) –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 1 '10 at 0:38
    
The temporary string does not go out of scope. The temporary's scope is the same as everything else in the function. It's only destroyed when the function exits, or when the temporary needs to be re-used to hold another temporary string. –  Rob Kennedy Sep 2 '10 at 22:00
1  
But you must probably use "random" file name, because function return FALSE, if file chk.tmp already exists in checked directory. –  Peter Aug 22 '11 at 10:50

Andreas...

Using the security APIs to get the effective rights for a file/directory is a PIA mess and just not reliable. (I dumped all of my code for doing so in favor of just checking to see if I could write a file in the dir.)

C.f., http://www.ureader.com/msg/16591730.aspx

(I have other refs., but I'm a new user and can post only one link. Just follow along with the URLS given in the link above.)

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