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I'm struggling to model a particular relationship with ActiveRecord. I currently have the following setup and working

class Schedule < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_many :tasks
end

class Task < ActiveRecord:Base
    belongs_to :schedule
end

with a database structure that looks like this:

schedules
  - integer:id

tasks
  - integer:id
  - integer:schedule_id

What I'd like to be able to do is set one of the tasks to be the active task for a schedule by adding an "active_task_id" column to the Schedules table:

schedules
  - integer:id
  - integer:active_task_id

tasks
  - integer:id
  - integer:schedule_id

What I'm struggling with is how I should describe this within my ActiveRecord classes

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

should look like this

class Schedule < ActiveRecord::Base 
    has_many :tasks 
    belongs_to :active_task, 
               :class_name => 'Task', 
               :foreign_key => 'active_task_id'
end 

class Task < ActiveRecord:Base 
    belongs_to :schedule 
    has_one :relevant_schedule,
            :class_name => 'Schedule',
            :foreign_key => 'active_task_id'
end 

the conceptually tricky part is defining the 'relevant_schedule' relation. this isn't really needed in most cases (i.e. will not be used by code you write), is needed for compelteness of the ORM.

it's unlikely you'll ever want to use task.relevant_schedule (in many cases it would be nil), you'll probably mostly want to use schedule.active_task in your code.

'relevant_schedule' is just an arbitrary name, you may choose any other name you like. :class_name and :foreign_key must exactly match database and model names. perhaps the 'relevant_schedule' definition may be omitted altogether. i'm not sure.

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This is great. Thanks for your help –  Dative Aug 30 '10 at 10:36

It seems like you'd be better off using an attribute rather than creating a separate id. Maybe your task could have a boolean column called active, then the active task for a schedule could be found with:

@schedule.tasks.select {|t|t.active?}

Or your could create named scope to accomplish the same thing.

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This was my plan-b. Looks like I should read up on named scopes too. Thanks. –  Dative Aug 30 '10 at 10:25

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