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My application need to run some scripts, and I must be sure that the administrator is running them... what is the best way doing it using C#?

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3 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Using WindowsPrincipal:

public static bool IsAdministrator()
{
    WindowsIdentity identity = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent();
    WindowsPrincipal principal = new WindowsPrincipal(identity);
    return principal.IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator);
}
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4  
Just a note that the above will not work if UAC is enabled in Vista or Win7; you'll need to pop up a UAC confirmation box and elevate permissions in that case. –  MisterZimbu Aug 30 '10 at 13:34
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Just thought I'd add another solution; as the IsInRole doesn't always work.

  • If the user isn't a member of the specified Windows User Group in the current session.
  • The administrator has made changes in the Group Policy Settings
  • The role parameter is treated as a 'Case Sensitive' method.
  • And if an XP machine doesn't have the .NET Framework Version installed it won't work.

Depending on your needs if you need to support older systems; or are unsure of how your client is physically managing your system. This is a solution I implemented; for flexibility and alterations.

class Elevated_Rights
    {

        // Token Bool:
        private bool _level = false;

        #region Constructor:

        protected Elevated_Rights()
        {

            // Invoke Method On Creation:
            Elevate();

        }

        #endregion

        public void Elevate()
        {

            // Get Identity:
            WindowsIdentity user = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent();

            // Set Principal
            WindowsPrincipal role = new WindowsPrincipal(user);

            #region Test Operating System for UAC:

            if (Environment.OSVersion.Platform != PlatformID.Win32NT || Environment.OSVersion.Version.Major < 6)
            {

                // False:
                _level = false;

                // Todo: Exception/ Exception Log

            }

            #endregion

            else
            {

                #region Test Identity Not Null:

                if (user == null)
                {

                    // False:
                    _level = false;

                    // Todo: "Exception Log / Exception"

                }

                #endregion

                else
                {

                    #region Ensure Security Role:

                    if (!(role.IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator)))
                    {

                        // False:
                        _level = false;

                        // Todo: "Exception Log / Exception"

                    }

                    else
                    {

                        // True:
                        _level = true;

                    }

                    #endregion


                } // Nested Else 'Close'

            } // Initial Else 'Close'

        } // End of Class.

So the above code has a few constructs; it will actually test to see if the User is on Vista or higher. That way if a customer is on XP without a framework or beta framework from years ago it will allow you to alter what you'd like to do.

Then it will physically test to avoid a null value for the account.

Then last of all it will provide the check to verify that the user is indeed in the proper role.

I know the question has been answered; but I thought my solution would be a great addition to the page for anyone else whom is searching Stack. My reasoning behind the Protected Constructor would allow you to use this class as a Derived Class that you could control the state of when the class is instantiated.

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return new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())
    .IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator);
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1  
@Nissim: Either extreme can be bad, but we need to judge on a case-by-case basis. –  Steven Sudit Aug 30 '10 at 12:43
24  
@Nissm: You both answered simultaneously, or near enough that 5 minutes after the fact you're both listed as having posted "5 minutes ago". There is no reason for you to attack Alex; we're not here to earn rep, we're here to help. –  Randolpho Aug 30 '10 at 12:44
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