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I need function that will take string and integer that indicates position of non-negative double or integer and return Number or null. If there is '+' return null.

Examples

2.1      , 0 -> 2.1
+2.1     , 0 -> null
-1       , 0 -> null
-1.2     , 1 -> 1.2
qwa56sdf , 3 -> 56

What is the most elegant way to do this? Thanks.

upd I need code like this, but better)

    Number parse(String str, int pos){
        Matcher m = Pattern.compile("^(\\d+(?:\\.\\d+)?)").matcher(str);
        m.region(pos, str.length());
        if(m.find()){
            return Double.parseDouble(m.group());
        } else {
            return null;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Why does your 3rd example return null? –  jjnguy Aug 30 '10 at 14:16
1  
Because it must be non-negative. –  Stas Kurilin Aug 30 '10 at 14:19
    
Then, why the fourth is not null ? –  Colin Hebert Aug 30 '10 at 14:21
2  
Because it start parsing from second character. –  Stas Kurilin Aug 30 '10 at 14:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public static Double parseDouble(String input, int fromIndex) {
    Matcher matcher = Pattern.compile("\\d*\\.?\\d+")
        .matcher(input.substring(fromIndex));
    return matcher.lookingAt() ? Double.parseDouble(matcher.group()) : null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It's good solution but there are many programmers that wouldn't understand it. –  Stas Kurilin Aug 30 '10 at 15:26

I think the following implementation would be more elegant for your set of requirements. I am using the java.text.NumberFormat class for parsing.

    private static Number parse(String text, int position){
        Number value=null;
        NumberFormat nf = NumberFormat.getInstance();
        try {
            value = nf.parse(text,new ParsePosition(position));
            if (value.intValue() < 0)
                value = null;
        } catch (Exception e) {
            value = null;
        }
        return value;
   }
share|improve this answer
    
This works well for all your sample inputs. –  Vikas Nalwar Nov 27 '11 at 17:28
    
Thanks. But actually I don't like use exceptions in not exceptional flows. –  Stas Kurilin Nov 28 '11 at 10:56
    
The parse() method throws only the ParseException in case it cannot parse the input expression such as "+21". This is perfectly valid and it should be caught and handled. In my piece of code above, I by mistake used generic Exception instead of ParseException. –  Vikas Nalwar Nov 28 '11 at 13:50

There is also the Scanner class. Which specifically has methods for reading in primitives, for example scanner.hasNextDouble() and scanner.nextDouble(). You'll still have to do the check for + or -, because that would still pass the check.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but for scanner I must specified delimiter, but I can't. –  Stas Kurilin Aug 30 '10 at 15:14
    
Sure you can, anything thats not a digit or a dot. "[^0-9.]" –  Russell Leggett Aug 30 '10 at 15:23
    
Yes, I can use delimiter, but I want parse from text like "1.2.3" result "1.2", not null. –  Stas Kurilin Aug 30 '10 at 15:36

You could try:

public static void main(String[] args) {
  System.out.println(parse("2.1", 0));
  System.out.println(parse("+2.1", 0));
  System.out.println(parse("-1", 0));
  System.out.println(parse("-1.2", 1));
  System.out.println(parse("qwa56sdf", 3));
}

private static Double parse(String string, int index) {
  if (string.charAt(index) == '-' || string.charAt(index) == '+') {
    return null;
  }
  try {
    return Double.parseDouble(string.substring(index).replaceAll("[^\\d.]", ""));
  }
  catch (NumberFormatException e) {
    return null;
  }
}

I had to strip the trailing non-digit characters with replace all because they caused a NumberFormatException and would return null for inputs like the one in your last example.

Edit: Your other option to work for cases like the one in the comment might be to check each character

private static Double parse(String string, int index) {
    String finalString = "";
    boolean foundSeparator = false;
    for (char c : string.substring(index).toCharArray()) {
        if (c == '.') {
            if (foundSeparator) {
                break;
            }
            else {
                foundSeparator = true;
            }
        }
        else if (!Character.isDigit(c)) {
            break;
        }
        finalString += c;
    }
    if (finalString == "") {
        return null;
    }
    return Double.parseDouble(finalString);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but there is trouble with inputs like parse("qwe5a6asf", 3) –  Stas Kurilin Aug 30 '10 at 14:49
    
I'm guessing that in this input you only want to match '5', that being the first valid number in that string. The updated version should work for this kind of case as well, I think. –  Andrei Fierbinteanu Aug 30 '10 at 15:08
    
Yes, I need something like in second variant. But I suppose that there must be better solution with NumberFormat or something like this. –  Stas Kurilin Aug 30 '10 at 15:21

If that is functionally correct, it looks elegant enough to me. You might want to make the Pattern a final class member since you only need to compile it once. And the region's probably not needed:

Matcher m = pattern.matcher(str.substring(pos));

Another option is to start with a 1-char-length substring and grow it until it doesn't parse anymore:

if ( str.charAt(pos) == '+' || str.charAt(pos) == '-' ) {
    //special cases
    return null;
}
Double val = null;
for ( int i = pos+1; i <= str.length(); i++ ) {
    try {
       val = Double.parseDouble(str.substring(pos, i)) {
    }  catch (NumberFormatException e) {
       break;
    }
}
return val;

It's a bit simpler but also naive performance-wise. A less readable but more performant solution would be to find the end of the double yourself before passing off to parse just by looking at the characters one at a time.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it's will be work, but I think there must be better solution. –  Stas Kurilin Aug 30 '10 at 14:58

You'll need to use a combination of the String.substring() method to start at the indicated position in the string and the NumberFormat class to parse the number.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Actually, NumberFormat has method parse with indexPosition, but there is problem with chars like '+' and '-'. –  Stas Kurilin Aug 30 '10 at 14:47

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