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How do I know if a variable is set in bash?

For example, how to check if the user gave the 1st parameter to a function?

function a {
    ?? if $1 is set
}
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1  
if test $# -gt 0; then printf 'arg <%s>\n' "$@"; fi. –  Jens Jul 9 '13 at 16:57
17  
Note to solution-seekers: There are many highly-rated answers to this question that answer the question "is variable non-empty". The more correction solutions ("is variable set") are mentioned in answers by Jens and Lionel below. –  Nathan Kidd Nov 29 '13 at 17:56
    
Also Russell Harmon and Seamus are correct with their -v test, although this is seemingly only available on new versions of bash and not portable across shells. –  Graeme Jan 28 at 17:58
2  
As pointed out by @NathanKidd, correct solutions are given by Lionel and Jens. prosseek, you should switch your accepted answer to one of these. –  Garrett Feb 13 at 23:22
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19 Answers

up vote 124 down vote accepted

There are many ways to do this with the following being one of them:

if [[ -z "$1" ]]

This succeeds if $1 is null, that is unset

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17  
There is a difference between an unset parameter and a parameter with a null value. –  chepner Mar 11 '13 at 18:14
10  
I just want to be pedantic and point out this is the opposite answer to what the question poses. The questions asks if the variable IS set, not if the variable is not set. –  Philluminati Jun 3 '13 at 13:06
30  
[[ ]] is nothing but a portability pitfall. if [ -n "$1" ] should be used here. –  Jens Jul 9 '13 at 16:55
39  
This answer is incorrect. The question asks for a way to tell whether a variable is set, not whether it's set to a non-empty value. Given foo="", $foo has a value, but -z will merely report that it's empty. And -z $foo will blow up if you have set -o nounset. –  Keith Thompson Aug 5 '13 at 19:13
3  
It depends on the definition of "variable is set". If you want to check if the variable is set to a non-zero string, then mbranning answer is correct. But if you want to check if the variable is declared but not initialized (i.e foo=), then Russel's answer is correct. –  Flow Oct 13 '13 at 15:38
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To check for non-null/non-zero string variable, i.e. if set, use

if [ -n "$1" ]

It's the opposite of -z. I find myself using -n more than -z.

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11  
[[ ]] is nothing but a portability pitfall. if [ -n "$1" ] should be used here. –  Jens Jul 9 '13 at 16:54
9  
I usually prefer [[ ]] over [ ], as [[ ]] is more powerfull and causes less problems in certain situations (see this question for an explanation of the difference between the two). The question specifically asks for a bash solution and doesn't mention any portability requirements. –  Flow Oct 13 '13 at 15:26
4  
The question is how one can see if a variable is set. Then you can't assume that the variable is set. –  HelloGoodbye Nov 12 '13 at 13:15
2  
I agree, [] works better especially for shell (non-bash) scripts. –  Hengjie Jun 2 at 13:09
1  
Fails on set -u. –  Ciro Santilli Jun 10 at 6:52
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The following solution is incorrect

if [ -z "$var" ]; then echo "var is unset"; else echo "var is set to '$var'"; fi

This is because it doesn't distinguish between a variable that is unset and a variable that is set to the empty string. That is to say, if var='', then the above solution will incorrectly output that var is unset.

A correct solution is to use

if [ -z ${var+x} ]; then echo "var is unset"; else echo "var is set to '$var'"; fi

where ${var+x} is a parameter expansion which evaluates to the null if var is unset and substitutes the string "x" otherwise.

This distinction is essential in situations where the user has to specify an extension, or additional list of properties, and that not specifying them defaults to a non-empty value, whereas specifying the empty string should make the script use an empty extension or list of additional properties.

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13  
This is the first proper answer to the question! –  Jens May 25 '13 at 20:08
    
It is, indeed, the most correct one –  JSmyth Jan 1 at 23:22
2  
@Garrett, your edit has made this answer incorrect, ${var+x} is the correct substitution to use. Using [ -z ${var:+x} ] produces no different result than [ -z "$var" ]. –  Graeme Feb 13 at 22:08
    
This is it. This worked perfectly. –  Qix May 17 at 18:09
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Here's how to test whether a parameter is unset, or empty ("Null") or set with a value:

enter image description here

Source: POSIX

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4  
+1. This is what I want. Thanks –  Yun Huang Aug 29 '13 at 13:01
    
This doesn't work if the parameter is 1, i.e. if you want to check whether the first argument to a script is set or not. –  HelloGoodbye Nov 26 '13 at 14:06
1  
@HelloGoodbye Yes it does work: set foo; echo ${1:-set but null or unset} echos "foo"; set --; echo ${1:-set but null or unset} echoes set but null ... –  Jens Nov 27 '13 at 13:07
    
How can the first example echo "foo"? How does "foo" come in to $1? –  HelloGoodbye Nov 27 '13 at 20:38
2  
@HelloGoodbye The positional parameters can be set with, uh, set :-) –  Jens Nov 28 '13 at 7:59
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While most of the techniques stated here are correct, bash supports an actual test for the presence of a variable, rather than testing the value of the variable.

$ [[ -v foo ]]; echo $?
1
$ foo=bar
$ [[ -v foo ]]; echo $?
0
$ foo=""
$ [[ -v foo ]]; echo $?
0
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4  
In bash 4.1.2, regardless of whether variable is set, [[ -v aaa ]]; echo $? ==> -bash: conditional binary operator expected -bash: syntax error near 'aaa' –  Dan Oct 31 '13 at 9:52
4  
The '-v' argument to the 'test' builtin was added in bash 4.2. –  Ti Strga Jan 13 at 17:19
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if [ "$1" != "" ]; then
  echo \$1 is set
else
  echo \$1 is not set
fi

Although for arguments it is normally best to test $#, which is the number of arguments, in my opinion.

if [ $# -gt 0 ]; then
  echo \$1 is set
else
  echo \$1 is not set
fi
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1  
The first test is backward; I think you want [ "$1" != "" ] (or [ -n "$1" ])... –  Gordon Davisson Aug 30 '10 at 16:40
    
@Gordon, fixed! –  Paul Creasey Aug 30 '10 at 16:44
3  
This will fail if $1 is set to the empty string. –  HelloGoodbye Nov 27 '13 at 20:56
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On a modern version of bash (4.2 or later I think, don't know for sure), I would try this:

if [ ! -v SOMEVARIABLE ] #note the lack of a $ sigil
then
    echo "Variable is unset"
elif [ -z "$SOMEVARIABLE" ]
then
    echo "Variable is set to an empty string"
else
    echo "Variable is set to some string"
fi
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+1 for pointing out the lack of $. I missed that when I read the docs. The docs do indeed say varname rather than string, but it didn't register in my brain. Another +1 if I could for mentioning that it only works on bash 4.2 or later. –  toxalot Mar 8 at 21:43
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You can do:

function a {
        if [ ! -z "$1" ]; then
                echo '$1 is set'
        fi
}
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5  
Or you could do -n and not negate the -z. –  Dennis Williamson Aug 30 '10 at 17:20
1  
you need quotes around $1, i.e., [ ! -z "$1" ]. Or you can write [[ ! -z $1 ]] in bash/ksh/zsh. –  Gilles Aug 31 '10 at 7:21
    
@Gilles: Thanks for pointing. –  codaddict Aug 31 '10 at 7:23
4  
This will fail if $1 is set to the empty string. –  HelloGoodbye Nov 27 '13 at 20:56
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To check whether a variable is set with a non-empty value, use [ -n "$x" ], as others have already indicated.

Most of the time, it's a good idea to treat a variable that has an empty value in the same way as a variable that is unset. But you can distinguish the two if you need to: [ -n "${x+set}" ] ("${x+set}" expands to set if x is set and to the empty string if x is unset).

To check whether a parameter has been passed, test $#, which is the number of parameters passed to the function (or to the script, when not in a function) (see Paul's answer).

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Read the "Parameter Expansion" section of the bash man page. Parameter expansion doesn't provide a general test for a variable being set, but there are several things you can do to a parameter if it isn't set.

For example:

function a {
    first_arg=${1-foo}
    # rest of the function
}

will set first_arg equal to $1 if it is assigned, otherwise it uses the value "foo". If a absolutely must take a single parameter, and no good default exists, you can exit with an error message when no parameter is given:

function a {
    : ${1?a must take a single argument}
    # rest of the function
}

(Note the use of : as a null command, which just expands the values of its arguments. We don't want to do anything with $1 in this example, just exit if it isn't set)

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To see if a variable is nonempty, I use

if [[ $var ]]; then ...       # `$var' expands to a nonempty string

The opposite tests if a variable is either unset or empty:

if [[ ! $var ]]; then ...     # `$var' expands to the empty string (set or not)

To see if a variable is set (empty or nonempty), I use

if [[ ${var+x} ]]; then ...   # `var' exists (empty or nonempty)
if [[ ${1+x} ]]; then ...     # Parameter 1 exists (empty or nonempty)

The opposite tests if a variable is unset:

if [[ ! ${var+x} ]]; then ... # `var' is not set at all
if [[ ! ${1+x} ]]; then ...   # We were called with no arguments
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case "$1" in
 "") echo "blank";;
 *) echo "set"
esac
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This will fail if $1 is set to the empty string. –  HelloGoodbye Nov 27 '13 at 20:58
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I found a (much) better code to do this if you want to check for anything in $@.

if [[ $1 = "" ]]
then
  echo '$1 is blank'
else
  echo '$1 is filled up'
fi

Why this all? Everything in $@ exists in Bash, but by default it's blank, so test -z and test -n couldn't help you.

Update: You can also count number of characters in a parameters.

if [ ${#1} = 0 ]
then
  echo '$1 is blank'
else
  echo '$1 is filled up'
fi
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With set -o errexit this might not work so well... –  solidsnack Nov 29 '13 at 22:42
    
I know, but that's it. If something is empty you'll get an error! Sorry. :P –  ZDroid Nov 30 '13 at 16:47
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To check if a var is set or not

var=""; [[ $var ]] && echo "set" || echo "not set"
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This will fail if $var is set to the empty string. –  HelloGoodbye Nov 27 '13 at 20:58
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If you wish to test that a variable is bound or unbound, this works well, even after you've turned on the nounset option:

set -o noun set

if printenv variableName >/dev/null; then
    # variable is bound to a value
else
    # variable is unbound
fi
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I think you mean set -o nounset, not set -o noun set. This only works for variables that have been exported. It also changes your settings in a way that's awkward to undo. –  Keith Thompson Aug 5 '13 at 19:10
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if [[ ${1:+isset} ]]
then echo "It was set and not null." >&2
else echo "It was not set or it was null." >&2
fi

if [[ ${1+isset} ]]
then echo "It was set but might be null." >&2
else echo "It was was not set." >&2
fi
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$1, $2 and up to $N is always set. Sorry, this is fail. –  ZDroid Nov 18 '13 at 14:45
    
@ZDroid Try it: gist.github.com/solidsnack/7559844 –  solidsnack Nov 20 '13 at 8:43
    
I tried it, and it didn't work, maybe my bash version lacks support for that. Idk, sorry if I'm wrong. :) –  ZDroid Nov 20 '13 at 18:53
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I always use this one, based on the fact that it seems easy to be understood by anybody who sees the code for the very first time :

if [ "$variable" = "" ]
  then
  echo "Variable X is empty"
fi

And, if wanting to check if not empty;

if [ ! "$variable" = "" ]
  then
  echo "Variable X is not empty"
fi

That's it

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1  
The question asks how to check if a variable is set, not if a variable is empty. –  HelloGoodbye Nov 27 '13 at 20:45
    
You probably need to use [[ ... ]] instead of [ ... ]. The latter is actually an external command and wouldn't have any visibility into whether a variable is set or not. –  solidsnack Nov 29 '13 at 22:41
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The answers above do not work when Bash option set -u is enabled. Also, they are not dynamic, e.g., how to test is variable with name "dummy" is defined? Try this:

is_var_defined()
{
    if [ $# -ne 1 ]
    then
        echo "Expected exactly one argument: variable name as string, e.g., 'my_var'"
        exit 1
    fi
    # Tricky.  Since Bash option 'set -u' may be enabled, we cannot directly test if a variable
    # is defined with this construct: [ ! -z "$var" ].  Instead, we must use default value
    # substitution with this construct: [ ! -z "${var:-}" ].  Normally, a default value follows the
    # operator ':-', but here we leave it blank for empty (null) string.  Finally, we need to
    # substitute the text from $1 as 'var'.  This is not allowed directly in Bash with this
    # construct: [ ! -z "${$1:-}" ].  We need to use indirection with eval operator.
    # Example: $1="var"
    # Expansion for eval operator: "[ ! -z \${$1:-} ]" -> "[ ! -z \${var:-} ]"
    # Code  execute: [ ! -z ${var:-} ]
    eval "[ ! -z \${$1:-} ]"
    return $?  # Pedantic.
}

Related: In Bash, how do I test if a variable is defined in "-u" mode

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[[ $foo ]]

Or

(( ${#foo} ))

Or

let ${#foo}

Or

declare -p foo
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