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In C++03, an expression is either an rvalue or an lvalue.

In C++11, an expression can be an:

  1. rvalue
  2. lvalue
  3. xvalue
  4. glvalue
  5. prvalue

Two categories have become five categories.

  • What are these new categories of expressions?
  • How do these new categories relate to the existing rvalue and lvalue categories?
  • Are the rvalue and lvalue categories in C++0x the same as they are in C++03?
  • Why are these new categories needed? Are the WG21 gods just trying to confuse us mere mortals?
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@Philip Potter: In C++03? Yes. An lvalue can be used as an rvalue because there is a standard lvalue-to-rvalue conversion. –  James McNellis Aug 30 '10 at 15:14
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@Tyler: "If you can assign to it, it's an lvalue, otherwise, it's an rvalue." -> Wrong, you can assign to class rvalues: string("hello") = string("world"). –  FredOverflow Aug 30 '10 at 15:44
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head.asplode(); –  j_random_hacker Nov 29 '10 at 10:02
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"trying to confuse us mere mortals?" They were not confused already? –  curiousguy Dec 10 '11 at 8:13
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I think Fred's link above is better than any of the answers here. The link is dead, though. It was moved to: stroustrup.com/terminology.pdf –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 12 '13 at 16:22

8 Answers 8

I guess this document might serve as a not so short introduction : n3055

The whole massacre began with the move semantics. Once we have expressions that can be moved and not copied, suddenly easy to grasp rules demanded distinction between expressions that can be moved, and in which direction.

From what I guess based on the draft, the r/l value distinction stays the same, only in the context of moving things get messy.

Are they needed? Probably not if we wish to forfeit the new features. But to allow better optimization we should probably embrace them.

Quoting n3055:

  • An lvalue (so-called, historically, because lvalues could appear on the left-hand side of an assignment expression) designates a function or an object. [Example: If E is an expression of pointer type, then *E is an lvalue expression referring to the object or function to which E points. As another example, the result of calling a function whose return type is an lvalue reference is an lvalue.]
  • An xvalue (an “eXpiring” value) also refers to an object, usually near the end of its lifetime (so that its resources may be moved, for example). An xvalue is the result of certain kinds of expressions involving rvalue references. [Example: The result of calling a function whose return type is an rvalue reference is an xvalue.]
  • A glvalue (“generalized” lvalue) is an lvalue or an xvalue.
  • An rvalue (so-called, historically, because rvalues could appear on the right-hand side of an assignment expression) is an xvalue, a temporary object or subobject thereof, or a value that is not associated with an object.
  • A prvalue (“pure” rvalue) is an rvalue that is not an xvalue. [Example: The result of calling a function whose return type is not a reference is a prvalue]

The document in question is a great reference for this question, because it shows the exact changes in the standard that have happened as a result of the introduction of the new nomenclature.

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Thanks, this answer is really helpful! But my compiler doesn't agree with your examples for xvalues and prvalues; they are the exact opposite. Returning by rvalue reference gives me a prvalue, and returning by value gives me an xvalue. Did you get them mixed up, or is my test bed broken? I tried this with GCC 4.6.1, clang (from svn) and MSVC, and they all show the same behavior. –  Kim Gräsman Mar 9 at 16:56
    
Oops, I just followed the link and noticed that the examples are in the source. I'll go find my copy of the standard and check what it says... –  Kim Gräsman Mar 9 at 17:03
    
I use the macros from here to test various expressions: stackoverflow.com/a/6114546/96963 It could be that they misdiagnose things. –  Kim Gräsman Mar 9 at 17:11
    
Adding the xvalue isn't for the move semantics. Only with both of lvalue and rvalue, the move semantics, perfect forward and rvalue reference still are work well. I think the xvalue is just for the decltype operator: if the operand expression is xvalue, the decltype give the type of rvalue reference. –  ligand Jul 29 at 4:54

What are these new categories of expressions?

The FCD (n3092) has an excellent description:

— An lvalue (so called, historically, because lvalues could appear on the left-hand side of an assignment expression) designates a function or an object. [ Example: If E is an expression of pointer type, then *E is an lvalue expression referring to the object or function to which E points. As another example, the result of calling a function whose return type is an lvalue reference is an lvalue. —end example ]

— An xvalue (an “eXpiring” value) also refers to an object, usually near the end of its lifetime (so that its resources may be moved, for example). An xvalue is the result of certain kinds of expressions involving rvalue references (8.3.2). [ Example: The result of calling a function whose return type is an rvalue reference is an xvalue. —end example ]

— A glvalue (“generalized” lvalue) is an lvalue or an xvalue.

— An rvalue (so called, historically, because rvalues could appear on the right-hand side of an assignment expressions) is an xvalue, a temporary object (12.2) or subobject thereof, or a value that is not associated with an object.

— A prvalue (“pure” rvalue) is an rvalue that is not an xvalue. [ Example: The result of calling a function whose return type is not a reference is a prvalue. The value of a literal such as 12, 7.3e5, or true is also a prvalue. —end example ]

Every expression belongs to exactly one of the fundamental classifications in this taxonomy: lvalue, xvalue, or prvalue. This property of an expression is called its value category. [ Note: The discussion of each built-in operator in Clause 5 indicates the category of the value it yields and the value categories of the operands it expects. For example, the built-in assignment operators expect that the left operand is an lvalue and that the right operand is a prvalue and yield an lvalue as the result. User-defined operators are functions, and the categories of values they expect and yield are determined by their parameter and return types. —end note

I suggest you read the entire section 3.10 Lvalues and rvalues though.

How do these new categories relate to the existing rvalue and lvalue categories?

Again:

Taxonomy

Are the rvalue and lvalue categories in C++0x the same as they are in C++03?

The semantics of rvalues has evolved particularly with the introduction of move semantics.

Why are these new categories needed?

So that move construction/assignment could be defined and supported.

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I like the diagram here. I think it might be useful to start the answer with "Every expression belongs to exactly one of the fundamental classifications in this taxonomy: lvalue, xvalue, or prvalue." Then it's easy to use the diagram to show those three fundamental classes are combined to make glvalue and rvalue. –  Aaron McDaid Oct 20 '13 at 12:30

I'll start with your last question:

Why are these new categories needed?

The C++ standard contains many rules that deal with the value category of an expression. Some rules make a distinction between lvalue and rvalue. For example, when it comes to overload resolution. Other rules make a distinction between glvalue and prvalue. For example, you can have a glvalue with an incomplete or abstract type but there is no prvalue with an incomplete or abstract type. Before we had this terminology the rules that actually need to distinguish between glvalue/prvalue referred to lvalue/rvalue and they were either unintentionally wrong or contained lots of explaining and exceptions to the rule a la "...unless the rvalue is due to unnamed rvalue reference...". So, it seems like a good idea to just give the concepts of glvalues and prvalues their own name.

What are these new categories of expressions? How do these new categories relate to the existing rvalue and lvalue categories?

We still have the terms lvalue and rvalue that are compatible with C++98. We just divided the rvalues into two subgroups, xvalues and prvalues, and we refer to lvalues and xvalues as glvalues. Xvalues are a new kind of value category for unnamed rvalue references. Every expression is one of these three: lvalue, xvalue, prvalue. A Venn diagram would look like this:

    ______ ______
   /      X      \
  /      / \      \
 |   l  | x |  pr  |
  \      \ /      /
   \______X______/
       gl    r

Examples with functions:

int   prvalue();
int&  lvalue();
int&& xvalue();

But also don't forget that named rvalue references are lvalues:

void foo(int&& t) {
  // t is initialized with an rvalue expression
  // but is actually an lvalue expression itself
}

cheers! s

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+1 : l33t ASCII Art ^^ –  Kornel Kisielewicz Sep 2 '10 at 20:28

Why are these new categories needed? Are the WG21 gods just trying to confuse us mere mortals?

I don't feel that the other answers (good though many of them are) really capture the answer to this particular question. Yes, these categories and such exist to allow move semantics, but the complexity exists for one reason. This is the one inviolate rule of moving stuff in C++11:

Thou shalt move only when it is unquestionably safe to do so.

That is why these categories exist: to be able to talk about values where it is safe to move from them, and to talk about values where it is not.

In the earliest version of r-value references, movement happened easily. Too easily. Easily enough that there was a lot of potential for implicitly moving things when the user didn't really mean to.

Here are the circumstances under which it is safe to move something:

  1. When it's a temporary or subobject thereof. (prvalue)
  2. When the user has explicitly said to move it.

If you do this:

SomeType &&Func() { ... }

SomeType &&val = Func();
SomeType otherVal{val};

What does this do? In older versions of the spec, before the 5 values came in, this would provoke a move. Of course it does. You passed an rvalue reference to the constructor, and thus it binds to the constructor that takes an rvalue reference. That's obvious.

There's just one problem with this; you didn't ask to move it. Oh, you might say that the && should have been a clue, but that doesn't change the fact that it broke the rule. val isn't a temporary because temporaries don't have names. You may have extended the lifetime of the temporary, but that means it isn't temporary; it's just like any other stack variable.

If it's not a temporary, and you didn't ask to move it, then moving is wrong.

The obvious solution is to make val an lvalue. This means that you can't move from it. OK, fine; it's named, so its an lvalue.

Once you do that, you can no longer say that SomeType&& means the same thing everwhere. You've now made a distinction between named rvalue references and unnamed rvalue references. Well, named rvalue references are lvalues; that was our solution above. So what do we call unnamed rvalue references (the return value from Func above)?

It's not an lvalue, because you can't move from an lvalue. And we need to be able to move by returning a &&; how else could you explicitly say to move something? That is what std::move returns, after all. It's not an rvalue (old-style), because it can be on the left side of an equation. It is neither an lvalue nor an rvalue; it's a new kind of thing.

What we have is a value that you can treat as an lvalue, except that it is implicitly moveable from. We call it an xvalue.

Note that xvalues are what makes us gain the other two categories of values. Prvalues are really just the new name for the previous type of rvalues. They're the rvalues that aren't xvalues. And the glvalue group exists to collect xvalues and lvalues, because they do share a lot of properties in common.

So really, it all comes down to xvalues and the need to restrict movement to exactly and only certain places. Those places are defined by the rvalue category; prvalues are the implicit moves, and xvalues are the explicit moves (std::move returns an xvalue).

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This is interesting but does it compile? Shouldn't Func have a return statement? –  ThomasMcLeod Jul 7 '12 at 16:42
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@Thomas: It's an example; it doesn't matter how it creates the return value. What matters is that it returns a &&. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 7 '12 at 17:11
    
Note: prvalues can be on the left-hand side of an equation, also - as in X foo(); foo() = X; ... For this fundamental reason, I can't quite follow the above excellent answer through to the end, because you really only make the distinction between the new xvalue, and the old-style prvalue, based on the fact that it can be on the lhs. –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 18 '13 at 16:18
    
@DanNissenbaum: "as in X foo(); foo() = X;" I don't understand how that's valid code. What are X and foo? Is one of those a function? –  Nicol Bolas Mar 18 '13 at 16:48
    
X being a class; X foo(); being a function declaration, and foo() = X(); being a line of code. (I left off the second set of parentheses in foo() = X(); in my above comment.) For a question I just posted with this usage highlighted, see stackoverflow.com/questions/15482508/… –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 18 '13 at 23:15

C++03's categories are too restricted to capture the introduction of rvalue references correctly into expression attributes.

With the introduction of them, it was said that an unnamed rvalue reference evaluates to an rvalue, such that overload resolution would prefer rvalue reference bindings, which would make it select move constructors over copy constructors. But it was found that this causes problems all around, for example with Dynamic Types and with qualifications.

To show this, consider

int const&& f();

int main() {
  int &&i = f(); // disgusting!
}

On pre-xvalue drafts, this was allowed, because in C++03, rvalues of non-class types are never cv-qualified. But it is intended that const applies in the rvalue-reference case, because here we do refer to objects (= memory!), and dropping const from non-class rvalues is mainly for the reason that there is no object around.

The issue for dynamic types is of similar nature. In C++03, rvalues of class type have a known dynamic type - it's the static type of that expression. Because to have it another way, you need references or dereferences, which evaluate to an lvalue. That isn't true with unnamed rvalue references, yet they can show polymorphic behavior. So to solve it,

  • unnamed rvalue references become xvalues. They can be qualified and potentially have their dynamic type different. They do, like intended, prefer rvalue references during overloading, and won't bind to non-const lvalue references.

  • What previously was an rvalue (literals, objects created by casts to non-reference types) now becomes an prvalue. They have the same preference as xvalues during overloading.

  • What previously was an lvalue stays an lvalue.

And two groupings are done to capture those that can be qualified and can have different dynamic types (glvalues) and those where overloading prefers rvalue reference binding (rvalues).

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the answer is obviously reasonable. xvalue is just rvalue which can be cv-qualified and dynamic typed! –  ligand Jul 29 at 6:28

fwiw, I found this article:

http://eli.thegreenplace.net/2011/12/15/understanding-lvalues-and-rvalues-in-c-and-c/

It may be of some help to someone in the future. imho, it isn't too complicated and it isn't too simple. It actually goes into a little depth/explanation but does so in an understandable way. It also mentions some stuff about c++11.

hih

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Link only answers are not ideal as they will be useless if the link breaks. It is better to summarize the link within the answer. Please don't answer in txt spk. txt spk S vry anoyiN n cn b hrd 2 undrst&. –  mnel Oct 26 '12 at 2:58
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I'm sorry about that. I'm pretty new to this format of communication (and to stackoverflow). I would try to summarize it but I'm afraid that to do it justice it would be way too much to put here. –  Jake Oct 26 '12 at 6:45

How do these new categories relate to the existing rvalue and lvalue categories?

A C++03 lvalue is still a C++0x lvalue, whereas a C++03 rvalue is called a prvalue in C++0x.

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Lvalue -- smth. from left hand side of the equal operator.

Rvalue -- smth. from right hand side of the equal operator. (in fact lvalues and temporary objects). Temporary objects can be pass to functions only by const reference.

By the way -- constructor of copy for auto_ptr has some strange signature in sense that it is not allowable to pass temporary auto_ptr to it. But ou can. It is feature for most compilers, so you can safely use it. But with C++2003 you can not do it legaly!

Rvalue Reference (or xvalue) -- temporary object will soon will be destroyed. You should take data from it, because he will die very soon. Such reference in C++11 has && signature.

Overload function with Xvalue Reference (A&&) has priority under constant reference (const A&)

PValue -- pure value. Real object.

Gvalue -- it is lvalue or xvalue.

Rvalue -- it is xvalue or pure value.

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