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I was learning about pointers in Google Go. And managed to write something like,

func hello(){

       fmt.Println("Hello World")
}

func main(){

       pfunc := hello     //pfunc is a pointer to the function "hello"
       pfunc()            //calling pfunc prints "Hello World" similar to hello function
}

Is there a way to declare the function pointer without defining it as done above? Can we write something like we do in C?

e.g. void (*pfunc)(void);

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4  
I don't know enough about Go to answer your question, but I have a counterquestion: why would you want to have function pointers when Go has proper first-class functions? –  Jörg W Mittag Aug 30 '10 at 15:44
1  
I suppose it is more of an educational question. I have a background in C and just started learning about Go. I noticed that Go has pointers similar to C and so wanted to learn if function pointers are possible in Go and if yes, how to declare them. –  Kevin Aug 30 '10 at 15:53

3 Answers 3

It works if you're using the signature. There's no pointer.

type HelloFunc func(string)

func SayHello(to string) {
    fmt.Printf("Hello, %s!\n", to)
}

func main() {
    var hf HelloFunc

    hf = SayHello

    hf("world")
}

Alternatively you can use the function signature directly, without declaring an own type.

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Thanks Mue for explaining usage of the "type" for functions. –  Kevin Aug 30 '10 at 16:42

Go doesn't have the same syntax for function pointers as C and C++ do. There's a pretty good explanation for that on the Go blog. Understandably the Go authors thought C's syntax for function pointers too similar to regular pointers, so in short they decided to make function pointers explicit; i.e. more readable.

Here's an example I wrote. Notice how the fp parameter is defined in calculate() and the other example below that shows you how you can make a function pointer into a type and use it in a function (the commented calculate function).

package main

import "fmt"

type ArithOp func(int, int)int

func main() {
    calculate(Plus)
    calculate(Minus)
    calculate(Multiply)
}

func calculate(fp func(int, int)int) {
    ans := fp(3,2)
    fmt.Printf("\n%v\n", ans) 
}

// This is the same function but uses the type/fp defined above
// 
// func calculate (fp ArithOp) {
//     ans := fp(3,2)
//     fmt.Printf("\n%v\n", ans) 
// }

func Plus(a, b int) int {
    return a + b
}

func Minus(a, b int) int {
    return a - b
}

func Multiply(a,b int) int {
    return a * b
}

The f parameter is defined as as function that takes two ints and returns a single int. This is somewhat the same thing Mue mentioned but shows a different usage example.

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Thanks Hannson. –  Kevin Sep 18 '10 at 10:39
    
I think you are misreading that blog post. It is not saying that function pointers aren't "allowed", rather that they have a different declaration syntax to in C. –  poolie Nov 16 '10 at 6:05
    
I wasn't misreading; I just had a poor choice of words :) –  Hannson Nov 18 '10 at 11:53

You could do it like this:

package main

import "fmt"

func hello(){

       fmt.Println("Hello World")
}

func main(){
       var pfunc func()
       pfunc = hello     //pfunc is a pointer to the function "hello"
       pfunc()            
}

If your function has arguments and e.g. a return value, it would look like:

func hello(name string) int{

       fmt.Println("Hello %s", name)
       return 0
}

and the variable would look like:

  var pfunc func(string)int
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