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I am new to partial classes and was wondering if someone could give me a "big picture" of why I would use them and what advantage I would gain in the process.

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20 Answers 20

The biggest use of partial classes is make life easier on code generators / designers. Partial classes allow the generator to simply emit the code they need to emit and do not have to deal with user edits to the file. Users are likewise free to annotate the class with new members by having a second partial class. This provides a very clean framework for separation of concerns.

A better way to look at it is to see how designers functioned before partial classes. The WinForms designer would spit out all of the code inside of a region with strongly worded comments about not modifying the code. It had to insert all sorts of heuristics to find the generated code for later processing. Now it can simply open the designer.cs file and have a high degree of confidence that it contains only code relative to the designer.

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10  
Tempted to give you -1 for giving me nightmares about how bad things were before partial classes :) –  Jon B Aug 30 '10 at 15:47
1  
@Jon :), I think we've all had those nightmares. –  JaredPar Aug 30 '10 at 15:47
4  
Once I wrote a code generator which produce more than 36K lines (or probably much more, I don't remeber exactly), and my editors were blocked when the source was opened. Partial classes allowed me to see the produced code without havin 4 GB of RAM. –  Luca Aug 30 '10 at 15:56
3  
I'd go as far to say that this is the only use for partial classes in production code. Although I accept it may be useful for refactoring. –  Gordon McAllister Aug 30 '10 at 18:56
2  
@Gordon -- HumerGu's answer is another that I think is fairly hard to argue against. Partial classes can be very handy for implementing interfaces in C#, and keeping the interface members clearly seperate from the class-members: stackoverflow.com/questions/3601901/why-use-partial-classes/… –  STW Aug 30 '10 at 21:14

Another use is to split the implementation of different interfaces, e.g:

partial class MyClass : IF1, IF2, IF3
{
    // main implementation of MyClass
}


partial class MyClass
{
    // implementation of IF1
}

partial class MyClass
{
    // implementation of IF2
}
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Good point! It's something I've done before and forgotten about, but is definately a nice way to keep the interface members clearly visible (especially in C#, since VB.NET uses the Implements keyword to denote a method belongs to an interface) –  STW Aug 30 '10 at 17:56
10  
+1 for something I've never thought of doing before –  Keith Williams Sep 19 '10 at 21:49
    
Very interesting use of partial. I really appreciate your answer. –  RestInPeace Jun 23 at 4:08

Aside from the other answers...

I've found them helpful as a stepping-stone in refactoring god-classes. If a class has multiple responsibilities (especially if it's a very large code-file) then I find it beneficial to add 1x partial class per-responsibility as a first-pass for organizing and then refactoring the code.

This helps greatly because it can help with making the code much more readable without actually effecting the executing behavior. It also can help identify when a responsibility is easy to refactor out or is tightly tangled with other aspects.

However--to be clear--this is still bad code, at the end of development you still want one responsibility per-class (NOT per partial class). It's just a stepping-stone :)

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I've used this technique a few times too. +1 –  Ant Aug 30 '10 at 22:35

One great use is separating generated code from hand-written code that belong in the same class.

For example since LINQ to SQL uses partial classes you can write your own implementation of certain pieces of functionality (like Many-to-Many relationships) and those pieces of custom code won't get overwritten when you re-generate the code.

The same goes for WinForms code. All the Designer generated code goes in one file that you generally don't touch. Your hand-written code goes in another file. That way, when you change something in Designer, your changes don't get blown away.

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keep everything as clean as possible when working with huge classes, or when working on a team, you can edit without overriding (or always commiting changes)

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  1. Multiple Developer Using Partial Classes multiple developer can work on the same class easily.
  2. Code Generator Partial classes are mainly used by code generator to keep different concerns separate
  3. Partial Methods Using Partial Classes you can also define Partial methods as well where a developer can simply define the method and the other developer can implement that.
  4. Partial Method Declaration only Even the code get compiled with method declaration only and if the implementation of the method isn't present compiled can safely remove that piece of code and no compile time error will occur.

Here are some point to consider while implementing the partial classes:-

  1. Use partial keyword in each part of partial class.
  2. Name of each part of partial class should be the same but source file name for each part of partial class can be different.
  3. All parts of a partial class should be in the same namespace.
  4. Each part of a partial class should be in the same assembly or DLL, in other words you can't create a partial class in source files of a different class library project.
  5. Each part of a partial class has the same accessibility. (like private, public or protected)
  6. If you inherit a class or interface on a partial class then it is inherited on all parts of a partial class.
  7. If a part of a partial class is sealed then the entire class will be sealed.
  8. If a part of partial class is abstract then the entire class will be considered an abstract class.
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The main use for partial classes is with generated code. If you look at the WPF (Windows Presentation Foundation) network, you define your UI with markup (XML). That markup is compiled into partial classes. You fill in code with partial classes of your own.

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Service references are another example where partial classes are useful to separate generated code from user-created code.

You can "extend" the service classes without having them overwritten when you update the service reference.

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It is true that Partial Class is used in auto code generation, one use can be maintaining a large class file which might have 2/3/4 thousands of code; you never know your class might end up with 10 thousand lines and you don't want to create a new class with different name.

public partial class Product
    {
        //50 business logic embedded in methods and properties....
    }
public partial class Product
    {
        //another 50 business logic embedded in methods and properties....
    }
//finally compile with product.class file.

another use can be, you and your friend can able to work on the same class as it is store in different file name. People might laugh but you never know it can be handful sometimes...

product1.cs

public partial class Product
    {
        //you are writing the business logic for fast moving product
    }

product2.cs

public partial class Product
    {
        //your friend are writing the business logic for easy going product
    }

// hope it make sense...

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If you have a sufficiently large class that doesn't lend itself to effective refactoring, separating it into multiple files helps keep things organized.

For instance, if you have a database for a site containing a discussion forum and a products system, and you don't want to create two different providers classes (NOT the same thing as a proxy class, just to be clear), you can create a single partial class in different files, like

MyProvider.cs - core logic

MyProvider.Forum.cs - methods pertaining specifically to the forum

MyProvider.Product.cs - methods for products

It's just another way to keep things organized.

Also, as others have said, it's about the only way to add methods to a generated class without running the risk of having your additions destroyed the next time the class is regenerated. This comes in handy with template-generated (T4) code, ORMs, etc.

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2  
I would advocate partial's as a stepping stone towards refactoring (the whole point of my answer), but wouldn't suggest them as an actual solution to writting clean code. If a partial class is cleanly seperated from other concerns of the class, then why not put in the extra small effort to promote it to a standalone class? –  STW Aug 30 '10 at 15:50
    
@STW: It may be that many object instances are created and used for various tasks. Separating the various tasks into different classes would require tracking down which instances were used for which tasks--potentially a much larger undertaking than merely moving blocks of code between source modules. –  supercat Aug 30 '10 at 16:44
3  
@supercat -- I understand entirely, but cleaning up that kind of spaghetti should be undertaken. I've got plenty of scars from cleaning up exactly that type of code, and would never advocate leaving it behind. Those types of messes are guaranteed to continuously create problems, and the long-term payoff is huge compared to just ignoring the problem. Code like that doesn't "smell", it reeks like a garbage dump. –  STW Aug 30 '10 at 17:17
    
@STW: I didn't mean to imply such refactoring wasn't worthwhile. My objection was to your suggesting that it was an "extra small effort". –  supercat Aug 30 '10 at 21:06
    
@supercat -- I tried to qualify that with "If a partial is cleanly separated from other concerns ... then it's a small effort". Going through the pain of untangling will usually save big in long-term maintenance, if not Rogaine –  STW Aug 30 '10 at 21:12

Partial classes make it possible to add functionality to a suitably-designed program merely by adding source files. For example, a file-import program could be designed so that one could add different types of known files by adding modules that handle them. For example, the main file type converter could include a small class:

Partial Public Class zzFileConverterRegistrar
    Event Register(ByVal mainConverter as zzFileConverter)
    Sub registerAll(ByVal mainConverter as zzFileConverter)
        RaiseEvent Register(mainConverter)
    End Sub
End Class

Each module that wishes to register one or more types of file converter could include something like:

Partial Public Class zzFileConverterRegistrar
    Private Sub RegisterGif(ByVal mainConverter as zzFileConverter) Handles Me.Register
        mainConverter.RegisterConverter("GIF", GifConverter.NewFactory))
    End Sub
End Class

Note that the main file converter class isn't "exposed"--it just exposes a little stub class that add-in modules can hook to. There is a slight risk of naming conflicts, but if each add-in module's "register" routine is named according to the type of file it deals with, they probably shouldn't pose a problem. One could stick a GUID in the name of the registration subroutine if one were worried about such things.

Edit/Addendum To be clear, the purpose of this is to provide a means by which a variety of separate classes can let a main program or class know about them. The only thing the main file converter will do with zzFileConverterRegistrar is create one instance of it and call the registerAll method which will fire the Register event. Any module that wants to hook that event can execute arbitrary code in response to it (that's the whole idea) but there isn't anything a module could do by improperly extending the zzFileConverterRegistrar class other than define a method whose name matches that of something else. It would certainly be possible for one improperly-written extension to break another improperly-written extension, but the solution for that is for anyone who doesn't want his extension broken to simply write it properly.

One could, without using partial classes, have a bit of code somewhere within the main file converter class, which looked like:

  RegisterConverter("GIF", GifConvertor.NewFactory)
  RegisterConverter("BMP", BmpConvertor.NewFactory)
  RegisterConverter("JPEG", JpegConvertor.NewFactory)

but adding another converter module would require going into that part of the converter code and adding the new converter to the list. Using partial methods, that is no longer necessary--all converters will get included automatically.

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it works, but a simple plugin-system to dynamically load these modules would be much nicer and would help eliminate the risk of modules corrupting one another (it could load the modules at runtime rather than requiring a recompile) –  STW Aug 30 '10 at 17:57
    
The risk of the modules corrupting one another can be pretty well minimized if they don't do anything with the zz_ class except hook a Register event and call a routine to register themselves. What risks do you see that wouldn't exist with a plug-in? Plug-ins are great if the end user is expected to "plug in" new modules. Sometimes, though, one wants to put all the functionality in a single exe. Being able to plug in source files without having to manually add a reference to the newly-added files can be handy. –  supercat Aug 30 '10 at 18:26
1  
the risk is fairly well contained in your line "...if they don't do anything [...] except...", the security and stability rides entirely on the developer following convention, and provides 0% assurance. If your use-case is to have them compiled in (perfectly valid, just needs to be a conscience trade-off) then why not just have the modules defined in seperate classes and implementing some IModule interface? –  STW Aug 30 '10 at 18:55
    
@STW: See addendum above. –  supercat Aug 30 '10 at 21:39
    
It sounds like a case of being "clever" gone bad. These aren't "modules", they are single class with many behaviors and responsibilities rolled into one at compile-time. There's a lot of better ways of doing this--you could use Reflection to scan the compiled assembly for classes which implement IModule, you could use a plugin-framework like MEF (just one of many), etc etc. –  STW Aug 30 '10 at 22:29

As an alternative to pre-compiler directives.

If you use pre-compiler directives (namely #IF DEBUG) then you end up with some gnarly looking code intermingled with your actual Release code.

You can create a seperate partial-class to contain this code, and either wrap the entire partial class in a directive, or omit that code-file from being sent to the compiler (effectively doing the same).

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Another use i saw is,

Extending a big abstract class regarding data access logic ,

i have various files with names Post.cs,Comment.cs,Pages.cs...

in Post.cs 

public partial class XMLDAO :BigAbstractClass
{
// CRUD methods of post..
}


in Comment.cs 

public partial class XMLDAO :BigAbstractClass
{
// CRUD methods of comment..
}

in Pages.cs 

public partial class XMLDAO :BigAbstractClass
{
// CRUD methods of Pages..
}
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Partial classes recently helped with source control where multiple developers were adding to one file where new methods were added into the same part of the file (automated by Resharper).

These pushes to git caused merge conflicts. I found no way to tell the merge tool to take the new methods as a complete code block.

Partial classes in this respect allows for developers to stick to a version of their file, and we can merge them back in later by hand.

example -

  • MainClass.cs - holds fields, constructor, etc
  • MainClass1.cs - a developers new code as they implement
  • MainClass2.cs - is another developers class for their new code.
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Partial classes are primarily introduced to help Code generators, so we (users) don't end up loosing all our work / changes to the generated classes like ASP.NET's .designer.cs class each time we regenerate, almost all new tools that generate code LINQ, EntityFrameworks, ASP.NET use partial classes for generated code, so we can safely add or alter logic of these generated codes taking advantage of Partial classes and methods, but be very carefully before you add stuff to the generated code using Partial classes its easier if we break the build but worst if we introduce runtime errors. For more details check this http://www.4guysfromrolla.com/articles/071509-1.aspx

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Partial classes allow programming split between two or more developers or as in my particular case, create code at runtime only implementing specific code that will be added into a class or type. For example, I have an entity "Entity1" that at runtime I add validation rules defined by the end user. So, on this way, I extend the functionality of the entity or type, without worrying about pre-existing code in that class or type.

Regards

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Most people remark that partial should only be used for a class that has a generated code file or for interfaces. I disagree, and here is why.

For one example, let's look at the C# System.Math class... that's class. I would not attempt to stuff 70+ methods all into the same single code file. It would be a nightmare to maintain.

Placing each math method into individual partial class files, and all code files into a Math folder in the project, would be significantly cleaner organization.

The same could/would hold true for many other classes that have a large amount of diverse functionality. For example a class for managing the PrivateProfile API might benefit by being split into a clean set of partial class files in a single project folder.

Personally, I also split what most people call "helper" or "utility" classes into individual partial files for each method or method functional group. For example on one project the string helper class has almost 50 methods. That would be a long unwieldy code file even using regions. It is significantly easier to maintain using individual partial class files for each method.

I would just be careful using partial classes and keep all code file layout consistent throughout the project when doing this. Such as placing any class public enums and class private members into a Common.cs or similarly named file in the folder, instead of spreading them out across the files unless they are specific to only the partial file they are contained in.

Keep in mind that when you split a class into separate files you also lose the ability to use the text editor splitter bar that lets you view two different sections of a current file simultaneously.

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Partial classes span multiple files.

How can you use the partial modifier on a C# class declaration?

With partial, you can physically separate a class into multiple files.

This is often done by code generators.

Example

With normal C# classes, you cannot declare a class in two separate files in the same project.

But with the partial modifier, you can.

This is useful if one file is commonly edited and the other is machine-generated or rarely edited.

An Example will clear your concept.

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
    A.A1();
    A.A2();
    }
}

//Contents of file A1.cs: C#

using System;

partial class A
{
    public static void A1()
    {
    Console.WriteLine("A1");
    }
}

//Contents of file A2.cs: C#

using System;

partial class A
{
    public static void A2()
    {
    Console.WriteLine("A2");
    }
}

Output

A1
A2

Partial is required here.

If you remove the partial modifier, you will get an error containing this text: [The namespace '<global namespace>' already contains a definition for 'A'].

Tip: To fix this, you can either use the partial keyword, or change one of the class names.

How does the C# compiler deal with partial classes?

If you disassemble the above program, you will see that the files A1.cs and A2.cs are eliminated.

You will find that the class A is present.

IL Disassembler So: Class A will contain the methods A1 and A2 in the same code block. The two classes were merged into one.

Compiled result of A1.cs and A2.cs: C#

internal class A
{
    // Methods
    public static void A1()
    {
    Console.WriteLine("A1");
    }

    public static void A2()
    {
    Console.WriteLine("A2");
    }
}

Summary

Partial classes can simplify certain C# programming situations.

They are often used in Visual Studio when creating Windows Forms/WPF programs.

The machine-generated C# code is separate.

Or You could find the whole Description here .

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Here is a list of some of the advantages of partial classes.

You can separate UI design code and business logic code so that it is easy to read and understand. For example you are developing an web application using Visual Studio and add a new web form then there are two source files, "aspx.cs" and "aspx.designer.cs" . These two files have the same class with the partial keyword. The ".aspx.cs" class has the business logic code while "aspx.designer.cs" has user interface control definition.

When working with automatically generated source, the code can be added to the class without having to recreate the source file. For example you are working with LINQ to SQL and create a DBML file. Now when you drag and drop a table it creates a partial class in designer.cs and all table columns have properties in the class. You need more columns in this table to bind on the UI grid but you don't want to add a new column to the database table so you can create a separate source file for this class that has a new property for that column and it will be a partial class. So that does affect the mapping between database table and DBML entity but you can easily get an extra field. It means you can write the code on your own without messing with the system generated code.

More than one developer can simultaneously write the code for the class.

You can maintain your application better by compacting large classes. Suppose you have a class that has multiple interfaces so you can create multiple source files depending on interface implements. It is easy to understand and maintain an interface implemented on which the source file has a partial class.

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1.At compile time, attributes of partial-type definitions are merged. For example, consider the following declarations:

[SerializableAttribute]
partial class Moon { }

[ObsoleteAttribute]
partial class Moon { }

They are equivalent to the following declarations:

[SerializableAttribute]
[ObsoleteAttribute]
class Moon { }

The following are merged from all the partial-type definitions:

  • XML comments

  • interfaces

  • generic-type parameter attributes

  • class attributes

  • members

2.Another thing, nested partial classes can be also partial:

partial class ClassWithNestedClass
{
    partial class NestedClass { }
}

partial class ClassWithNestedClass
{
    partial class NestedClass { }
}
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