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I've made the following extension method ...

public static class ObjectExtensions
{
    public static T As<T>(this object pObject, T pDefaultValue)
    {
        if (pObject == null || pObject == DBNull.Value)
            return pDefaultValue;
        return (T) pObject;
    }
}

... which i use for e.g. reading data like so:

string field = datareader["column"].As("default value when null")

But it doesn't work when i want to cast to a nullable enum from a boxed value. The best i could come up with was this (messy WIP code which doesn't work):

public static class ObjectExtensions
{
    public static T As<T>(this object pObject, T pDefaultValue)
    {
        if (pObject == null || pObject == DBNull.Value)
            return pDefaultValue;

        var lType = typeof (T);

        if (!IsNullableEnum(lType))
            return (T) pObject;

        var lEnumType = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(lType);
        var lEnumPrimitiveType = lEnumType.GetEnumUnderlyingType();

        if (lEnumPrimitiveType == typeof(int))
        {
            var lObject = (int?) pObject;
            return (T) Convert.ChangeType(lObject, lType);
        }

        throw new InvalidCastException();
    }

    private static bool IsNullableEnum(Type pType)
    {
        Type lUnderlyingType = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(pType);
        return (lUnderlyingType != null) && lUnderlyingType.IsEnum;
    }
}

Usage:

public enum SomeEnum {Value1, Value2};
object value = 1;
var result = value.As<SomeEnum?>();

The current error is an InvalidCastException when it tries to cast an Int32 to the nullable enum. Which is ok i guess, but i've no idea how else i could do that? I've tried to create an instance of the nullable enum T and assign it a value, but i'm stuck on how exactly this can be done.

Anyone an idea or a better way to solve this? Is it even possible to solve that in a generic way? I've done quite a lot of searching on that, but i've not found anything useful.

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What happens if you change (in your 'usage' piece): object value = 2 to object value = 1 or object value = 0? –  AllenG Aug 30 '10 at 16:00
    
I corrected the usage to use a valid enum value. –  haraldr Aug 31 '10 at 8:28
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do it by invoking the constructor for the nullable type you need. Like this:

            Type t = typeof(Nullable<>).MakeGenericType(lEnumType);
            var ctor = t.GetConstructor(new Type[] { lEnumType });
            return (T)ctor.Invoke(new object[] { pObject });
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With Hans' answer i was able to get it working and if anyone is interested here's the fixed version:

public static class ObjectExtensions
{
    private static Dictionary<Type, ConstructorInfo> _NullableEnumCtor = new Dictionary<Type, ConstructorInfo>();

    public static T As<T>(this object pObject)
    {
        return As(pObject, default(T));
    }

    public static T As<T>(this object pObject, T pDefaultValue)
    {
        if (pObject == null || pObject == DBNull.Value)
            return pDefaultValue;

        var lObjectType = pObject.GetType();
        var lTargetType = typeof(T);

        if (lObjectType == lTargetType)
            return (T) pObject;

        var lCtor = GetNullableEnumCtor(lTargetType);
        if (lCtor == null)
            return (T) pObject;

        return (T)lCtor.Invoke(new[] { pObject });
    }

    private static ConstructorInfo GetNullableEnumCtor(Type pType)
    {
        if (_NullableEnumCtor.ContainsKey(pType))
            return _NullableEnumCtor[pType];

        var lUnderlyingType = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(pType);
        if (lUnderlyingType == null || !lUnderlyingType.IsEnum)
        {
            lock (_NullableEnumCtor) { _NullableEnumCtor.Add(pType, null); }
            return null;
        }

        var lNullableType = typeof(Nullable<>).MakeGenericType(lUnderlyingType);
        var lCtor = lNullableType.GetConstructor(new[] { lUnderlyingType });

        lock (_NullableEnumCtor) { _NullableEnumCtor.Add(pType, lCtor); }
        return lCtor;
    }
}

But the additional checks/code for the nullable enum hurts performance for all other types. Before the extension method was ~2-3 slower, now it's ~10-15 times. Doing it 1000000 (million) times using the code above:

Unboxing int: 4ms
Unboxing int using extension method: 59ms (before without taking care of nullable enum: 12ms)
Unboxing to nullable enum: 5ms
Unboxing to nullable enum using extension method: 3382ms

So, looking at these numbers these methods shouldn't be the first choice when performance is critical - at least not when using it for nullable enums.

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