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I a have a multithread application (MIDAS) that makes uses of windows messages to communicate with itself.

MAIN FORM

The main form receives windows messages sent by the RDM LogData(‘DataToLog’)

Because windows messages are used they have the following attributes

  1. Received messages are Indivisible
  2. Received messages are Queued in the order they are sent

QUESTION:

Can you Suggest a better way doing this without using windows messages ?

MAIN FORM CODE

const
    UM_LOGDATA      = WM_USER+1002;

type

  TLogData = Record
      Msg        : TMsgNum;
      Src        : Integer;
      Data       : String;
  end;
  PLogData = ^TLogData;


  TfrmMain = class(TForm)
  //  
  private
    procedure LogData(var Message: TMessage);        message UM_LOGDATA;
  public
  //        
  end;


procedure TfrmMain.LogData(var Message: TMessage);
var LData : PLogData;
begin
    LData  :=  PLogData(Message.LParam);
    SaveData(LData.Msg,LData.Src,LData.Data);
    Dispose(LData);
end;

RDM CODE

procedure TPostBoxRdm.LogData(DataToLog : String);
var
  WMsg  : TMessage;
  LData : PLogData;
  Msg   : TMsgNum;
begin
  Msg := MSG_POSTBOX_RDM;
  WMsg.LParamLo := Integer(Msg);
  WMsg.LParamHi := Length(DataToLog);
  new(LData);
    LData.Msg    := Msg;
    LData.Src    := 255;
    LData.Data   := DataToLog;
  WMsg.LParam := Integer(LData);
  PostMessage(frmMain.Handle, UM_LOGDATA, Integer(Msg), WMsg.LParam);
end;

EDIT:

Why I want to get rid of the windows messages:

  • I would like to convert the application into a windows service
  • When the system is busy – the windows message buffer gets full and things slows down
share|improve this question
    
What kind of problem do Windows messages cause? IOW, what are you trying to solve? –  gabr Dec 11 '08 at 19:32
    
You can use windows messages in a Delphi-written Windows service. –  gabr Dec 11 '08 at 20:02

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use Named Pipes. If you don't know how to use them, then now is the time to learn.

With named pipes, you can send any type of data structure (as long as both the server and the client know what that data structure is). I usually use an array of records to send large collections of info back and forth. Very handy.

I use Russell Libby's free (and open-source) named pipe components. Comes with a TPipeServer and a TPipeClient visual component. They make using named pipes incredibly easy, and named pipes are great for inter-process communication (IPC).

You can get the component here. The description from the source is: // Description : Set of client and server named pipe components for Delphi, as // well a console pipe redirection component.

Also, Russell helped me out on Experts-Exchange with using an older version of this component to work in a console app to send/receive messages over named pipes. This may help as a guide in getting you up and running with using his components. Please note, that in a VCL app or service, you don't need to write your own message loop as I did in this console app.

program CmdClient;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Pipes;

type
  TPipeEventHandler =  class(TObject)
  public
     procedure  OnPipeSent(Sender: TObject; Pipe: HPIPE; Size: DWORD);
  end;

procedure TPipeEventHandler.OnPipeSent(Sender: TObject; Pipe: HPIPE; Size: DWORD);
begin
  WriteLn('On Pipe Sent has executed!');
end;

var
  lpMsg:         TMsg;
  WideChars:     Array [0..255] of WideChar;
  myString:      String;
  iLength:       Integer;
  pcHandler:     TPipeClient;
  peHandler:     TPipeEventHandler;

begin

  // Create message queue for application
  PeekMessage(lpMsg, 0, WM_USER, WM_USER, PM_NOREMOVE);

  // Create client pipe handler
  pcHandler:=TPipeClient.CreateUnowned;
  // Resource protection
  try
     // Create event handler
     peHandler:=TPipeEventHandler.Create;
     // Resource protection
     try
        // Setup clien pipe
        pcHandler.PipeName:='myNamedPipe';
        pcHandler.ServerName:='.';
        pcHandler.OnPipeSent:=peHandler.OnPipeSent;
        // Resource protection
        try
           // Connect
           if pcHandler.Connect(5000) then
           begin
              // Dispatch messages for pipe client
              while PeekMessage(lpMsg, 0, 0, 0, PM_REMOVE) do DispatchMessage(lpMsg);
              // Setup for send
              myString:='the message I am sending';
              iLength:=Length(myString) + 1;
              StringToWideChar(myString, wideChars, iLength);
              // Send pipe message
              if pcHandler.Write(wideChars, iLength * 2) then
              begin
                 // Flush the pipe buffers
                 pcHandler.FlushPipeBuffers;
                 // Get the message
                 if GetMessage(lpMsg, pcHandler.WindowHandle, 0, 0) then DispatchMessage(lpMsg);
              end;
           end
           else
              // Failed to connect
              WriteLn('Failed to connect to ', pcHandler.PipeName);
        finally
           // Show complete
           Write('Complete...');
           // Delay
           ReadLn;
        end;
     finally
        // Disconnect event handler
        pcHandler.OnPipeSent:=nil;
        // Free event handler
        peHandler.Free;
     end;
  finally
     // Free pipe client
     pcHandler.Free;
  end;

end.
share|improve this answer

Option 1: Custom Message Queue

You can build a custom message queue, and push messages to the queue, sort the queue based on business rules, and pop messages from queue from the main thread for processing. Use a critical section for synchronization.

Option 2: Callbacks

Use callbacks to send data back and forth from the threads. Again, use a critical section for synchronization.

share|improve this answer

OmniThreadLibrary contains very efficient message queue in OtlComm.pas unit.

Documentation is not very good at the moment (start here) but you can always use the forum.

share|improve this answer
1  
I wouldn't suggest adding an entire new threading library simply for its message queue. Use OmniThreadLibrary if you are looking for a different threading library (and it is very high quality). –  Mick Dec 12 '08 at 18:19
1  
I agree. But you don't have to use the OTL threading library to use the communication subsystem. OtlComm unit is pretty much standalone and can be used with any threading model and also in single-threaded applications. –  gabr Dec 23 '08 at 11:23
    
I didn't know that. Good to know! –  Mick Jan 1 '09 at 17:58
    
What are the pros using message queue compared to the other solutions ? –  menjaraz Mar 15 '12 at 11:37

Yes – Gabr you can use windows messages in a service.

==============================

Before Windows Vista, you could have configured your service to interact with the desktop. That makes the service run on the same desktop as a logged-in user, so a program running as that user could send messages to your service's windows. Windows Vista isolates services, though; they can't interact with any user's desktop anymore.

=============================

A Quote from Rob Kennedy answer to ‘TService won’t process messages’

But I will not able to use 'frmMain.Handle' to post messages from the RDM to the main form in windows Vista.

All I need to do is find a different way of posting & receive the message

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't know that - thanks for the info! –  gabr Dec 11 '08 at 22:15

Windows Messages CAN still be used in Windows Vista! The issue at hand is that a technology in vista called User Interface Privilege Isolation (UIPI) prevents processes with a lower integrity level (IL) from sending messages to a proccess with a high IL (e.g. a windows service has a high IL and user-mode apps have medium IL).

However, this can be bypassed and medium IL apps can be allowed to send wm's to high IL processes.

Wikipedia says it best:

UIPI is not a security boundary, and does not aim to protect against all shatter attacks. UI Accessibility Applications can bypass UIPI by setting their "uiAccess" value to TRUE as part of their manifest file. This requires the application to be in the Program Files or Windows directory, as well as to be signed by a valid code signing authority, but these requirements will not necessarily stop malware from respecting them.

Additionally, some messages are still allowed through, such as WM_KEYDOWN, which allows a lower IL process to drive input to an elevated command prompt.

Finally, the function ChangeWindowMessageFilter allows a medium IL process (all non-elevated processes except Internet Explorer Protected Mode) to change the messages that a high IL process can receive from a lower IL process. This effectively allows bypassing UIPI, unless running from Internet Explorer or one of its child processes.

Someone over at Delphi-PRAXIS (link is in German. Use Google to Translate the page) has already tackled this problem and posted their code using ChangeWindowMessageFilter. I believe their issue is that WM_COPYDATA would not work on Vista until they modified their code to bypass UIPI for WM_COPYDATA.

Original Link (German)

unit uMain; 

interface 

uses 
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms, 
  Dialogs, ExtCtrls, StdCtrls, uallHook, uallProcess, uallUtil, uallKernel; 

type 
  TfrmMain = class(TForm) 
    lbl1: TLabel; 
    tmrSearchCondor: TTimer; 
    mmo1: TMemo; 
    procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject); 
    procedure tmrSearchCondorTimer(Sender: TObject); 
    procedure FormDestroy(Sender: TObject); 
  private 
    { Private-Deklarationen } 
    fCondorPID : DWord; 
    fInjected : Boolean; 
    fDontWork : Boolean; 
    procedure SearchCondor; 
    procedure InjectMyFunctions; 
    procedure UnloadMyFunctions; 
    function GetDebugPrivileges : Boolean; 
    procedure WriteText(s : string); 
    procedure WMNOTIFYCD(var Msg: TWMCopyData); message WM_COPYDATA; 
  public 
    { Public-Deklarationen } 
  end; 

var 
  frmMain: TfrmMain; 
  ChangeWindowMessageFilter: function (msg : Cardinal; dwFlag : Word) : BOOL; stdcall; 

implementation 

{$R *.dfm} 

type Tmydata = packed record 
       datacount: integer; 
       ind: boolean; 
     end; 

const cCondorApplication = 'notepad.exe'; 
      cinjComFuntionsDLL = 'injComFunctions.dll'; 

var myData : TMydata; 

procedure TfrmMain.WMNOTIFYCD(var Msg: TWMCopyData); 
begin 
  if Msg.CopyDataStruct^.cbData = sizeof(TMydata) then 
  begin 
    CopyMemory(@myData,Msg.CopyDataStruct^.lpData,sizeof(TMyData)); 
    WriteText(IntToStr(mydata.datacount)) 
  end; 
end; 

procedure TfrmMain.WriteText(s : string); 
begin 
  mmo1.Lines.Add(DateTimeToStr(now) + ':> ' + s); 
end; 

procedure TfrmMain.InjectMyFunctions; 
begin 
  if not fInjected then begin 
    if InjectLibrary(fCondorPID, PChar(GetExeDirectory + cinjComFuntionsDLL)) then fInjected := True; 
  end; 
end; 

procedure TfrmMain.UnloadMyFunctions; 
begin 
  if fInjected then begin 
    UnloadLibrary(fCondorPID, PChar(GetExeDirectory + cinjComFuntionsDLL)); 
    fInjected := False; 
  end; 
end; 

procedure TfrmMain.SearchCondor; 
begin 
  fCondorPID := FindProcess(cCondorApplication); 
  if fCondorPID <> 0 then begin 
    lbl1.Caption := 'Notepad is running!'; 
    InjectMyFunctions; 
  end else begin 
    lbl1.Caption := 'Notepad isn''t running!'; 
  end; 
end; 

procedure TfrmMain.FormDestroy(Sender: TObject); 
begin 
  UnloadMyFunctions; 
end; 

function TfrmMain.GetDebugPrivileges : Boolean; 
begin 
  Result := False; 
  if not SetDebugPrivilege(SE_PRIVILEGE_ENABLED) then begin 
    Application.MessageBox('No Debug rights!', 'Error', MB_OK); 
  end else begin 
    Result := True; 
  end; 
end; 

procedure TfrmMain.FormCreate(Sender: TObject); 
begin 
  @ChangeWindowMessageFilter := GetProcAddress(LoadLibrary('user32.dll'), 'ChangeWindowMessageFilter'); 
  ChangeWindowMessageFilter(WM_COPYDATA, 1); 
  fInjected := False; 
  fDontWork := not GetDebugPrivileges; 
  tmrSearchCondor.Enabled := not fDontWork; 
end; 

procedure TfrmMain.tmrSearchCondorTimer(Sender: TObject); 
begin 
  tmrSearchCondor.Enabled := False; 
  SearchCondor; 
  tmrSearchCondor.Enabled := True; 
end; 

end.
share|improve this answer

The creators of the madExcept library etc provide IPC functionality which can be used instead of Windows messages.

http://help.madshi.net/IPC.htm

I developed a Windows screensaver at one stage, and I wanted to get my screensaver to send some notification to another program, and while the screensaver was active, I was unable to get window messages to work between the two apps.

I replaced it with the IPC functionality mentioned above.

Worked a treat.

share|improve this answer

I use this library for IPc (uses shared memory + mutex): http://17slon.com/gp/gp/gpsync.htm

It has TGpMessageQueueReader and TGpMessageQueueWriter. Use "Global\" in front of the name, so you can use it to communicate between a Windows Service and a "Service GUI Helper" when a user logs in. (the Global\ prefix is needed for Vista because of session security rings, but also for Windows XP/2003 between user sessions).

It is very fast, multithreaded, etc. I would use this one instead of WM_COPYDATA (slow & much overhead if you use it a lot, but for small things messages can be OK)

share|improve this answer

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